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Old 04-06-2011, 09:20 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Can I use tubeless tires in these rims?

So I've searched and read the numerous post about tubed vs. tubeless tire debate, but am still confused on the subject. Some say you can and can't w/ the riveted style rims.

I assume that the rims in the attached pics are the 'riveted' type, correct?

Is there a definitive answer out there?

Also, any suggestions for a decent tire in 235/70-16 or 225/75-16 that a decent multi use tire? My rover sees about a 80/20 road vs offroad mix.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 04-06-2011, 12:49 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Yes, your rims are rivetted, but that doesn't mean you can't use tubeless tires. You can put a tube in a tubeless tire just as though it were not a tubeless tire. Your installer needs to put a "flap" in first. It's basically a big rubber band that revents tube chafe. I've heard of people puting a bead of silicone sealant over the rivets, but tubes are certainly a lot simpler, albeit they aren't as cheap as they used to be.
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Old 04-06-2011, 05:29 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Definitive answer for my truck is "Yes". I've successfully run tubeless tires on riveted Land Rover rims for years and on several sets of rims. In recent years they've "invented" a raised rim around the circumference to help keep the tire in place in case of a flat.

Tubeless tires are easier to build because they don't have to worry about the inside finish. A tube tire has to have a much smoother interior so it doesn't damage the tube.

If your rims are old and abused, you may have a leaky rivet. If so, you should be more concerned about a damaged wheel than you should be about the leak.
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Old 04-06-2011, 06:09 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Also, if running radials, be sure to get radial tubes, and use plenty of talc between the tube and tire.
I'm guessing a lot of today's tire shops don't know anything about tube type tires, so shop around. A farm store tire shop would be a good bet.
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Old 04-07-2011, 07:23 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Greg S,

The rims are in very solid shape and have recently be powder-coated so I think they may be just fine for a tubeless solution.

But, can you tell me more about this raised rim solution that was invented? Does it have a specific name?

Thanks.
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Old 04-07-2011, 08:21 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Why not just run a more modern tubeless wheel with a bias or radial tyre?

They are cheap!

You can still get brand new tube type truck and military tyres from Coker tire.

As mentioned, Farm/Ranch/industrial supply store's also can get hold of tubes and tube type tyres as they are still common in those industries.

I guess what I am saying is use the correct tyre for the correct rim. It can make a big mess of your truck if a tyre lets go at speed. Driving a Series Land Rover in modern traffic is dodgy enough without needing to worry about the tyres as well.

My 2c.
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Old 04-07-2011, 10:48 PM   #7 (permalink)
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"...can you tell me more about this raised rim..."
On more modern (with in the last 25-30 years) rims that are all considered to be for tubeless tires, the tire bead seals against the outer rim, just inside for where the bead sits there is a slightly raised ring built into the rim that is supposed to make it harder for the bead to slip away from the rim sealing surface. I don't know if this is in universal use or just on some makes of rims. I believe the angle of the edge of the rim where the bead seals is also supposed to be a different angle than for a tubed tire. All irrelevant IMHO as tubeless tires were going on steel wheel LONG before any of these advances were "invented". Newer Range Rover aluminum wheels have a larger raised 'keeper' (good enough name for it I guess) to the point that I've heard tire guys cursing under their breath about it and commented that they are the biggest they've ever run across and "That tire sure isn't coming off there if they get a flat." Kind of a built in and no-moving-parts bead lock.

I don't know if it's true or not but one of my tire guys once told me that there isn't a tube made any more that isn't a radial tube. Or at least not available to him here in Canada. In case you were thinking of going that way. And I suspect the comment about the talc was to compensate for the rougher surface inside a tubeless tire if it has a tube in it to mitigate the roughness that might otherwise hole the tube.
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