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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Friends:

Yet another Disco 2 I've found and Im convinced I can restore it back to its glory! I can do most things but this one needs a 1/4 chassis replacement and for that, I need help. I found the replacement section and am about to order it.

My questions are these:
  • Does anyone have an idea how long a competent shop might take to replace this?
  • I've done the 1/2 chassis on a couple Discos in the past, but the 1/4 chassis seems a lot less work. This shop is quoting me 17 hours to do the job and I have no idea if that is reasonable or not?
  • Does anyone have a thought on this?
  • Whats all involved that you know of? (I've watched some youtube vids, seems straight-forward enough)

Thanks for any advice!

93607
 

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Are we talking straightening the frame?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No, a replacement of the rear section. You remove the gas tank and cut out the bad section, replace with the new section.

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17 seems a little high but as anyone who has done similar jobs on an old truck, things often take longer than you imagine.
Maybe think of it this way….
How long would it take you to do yourself? What if the fuel lines, filler tubes body mounts etc don’t co operate?
What equipment would be required that you don’t possess?
Might just change your opinion of the costs 🤔
 

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I also thought it seemed a little high, but you’re right: when it takes 15min to remove a simple (rusted) 10mm bolt, it adds up quickly lol.

might be worth your time to strip it down mostly yourself and trailer it to the shop for only the fab work?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Rev and Red: Yea really good call. I may just strip it down myself since I know I can do that. I just dont have the knowledge nor gear to weld. Im heavily re-considering this now. Thanks for the insight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh - follow up question. I'ver never had to change the fuel pump on any disco so far. When I drop the tank on this, do I need to tend to the disconnection if the fuel lines from inside of the boot before I drop the tank? Or can I do that once I drop the tank gently?
 

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TBH I’ve never had to fuss with any of mine either
 

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Oh - follow up question. I'ver never had to change the fuel pump on any disco so far. When I drop the tank on this, do I need to tend to the disconnection if the fuel lines from inside of the boot before I drop the tank? Or can I do that once I drop the tank gently?
I believe the fuel pump is accessible from a cover plate in the rear, no need to drop the tank.
 

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I did that exact repair on my D2, in my driveway. Took about 8-9 hrs including all the rusty stuff. Then another two hours to mount the new steel bumper.
 

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DiscoGreg, unfortunately it appears that none of the respondents so far have actually done a 1/4 chassis replacement. I have. (My company, Atlanta on Wheels, has renovated over 125 D2's, more than one with rusty frame rails). The job is not technically difficult, but a lot of work and does require a good MIG (or TIG) welder. Start by measuring and marking where the subframe will end its overlap of the truck frame. The measure back the distance of the overlap "sleeve" of the subframe (about 7 inches as I recall). Back that measurement up a 1/2 inch or so at that will be the cut point on the truck frame. Get close, but don't worry, this is not an exact fit job. Grind as much of the surface rust off the truck frame where that first mark was, that's where the weld must be good. But here's the hardest part: you are about to drop the gas tank and the cut-off section of the frame and every rusty nut an bolt will fight you and few will be reuseable after you've fought to get them off. So I strongly suggest you first get to an junkyard and find a not-so-rusty truck and snag the fuel tank mounts (bolts and straps, maybe the skid shield, too) and the rear frame mounting hardware. You may also want to swap out the tow hitch and its hardware. Next you are ready to drop the gas tank - it MUST come out for safety's sake! Refer to your RAVE manual for fuel pump removal; roll your cargo carpet up and remove the fuel pump inspection cover (again, you'll probably find the rust worms have been at work here too so it may be a good idea to snag the cover and screws from your junkyard find). Using a long drift and a 2 lb ballpeen hammer, work the FP retaining ring loose. This is slow, frustrating work, but it WILL go. Remove the fuel pump connections and set it aside. You won't need to mess with the fuel line, but it wouldn't be a bad idea to shield it with tinfoil or the like. Disconnect the filler hose (again, did you have good quality hardware?). Of course, you've planned for this event by driving as much gas out of the tank as you can beforehand. If you've gotten the good nuts and bolts you can use your cut-off tool to rip through the gas tank removal quickly, otherwise that's the battle Drop the tank. Fitting the subframe onto the chassis stubs will actually go pretty easy if you prepped the chassis well, but a big deadblow hammer and maybe a 3ft breaker bar should be at hand. Bolt the rear of the subframe in place and let your welder do his thing! He'll tack the subframe in place and then fill in the joint and the cutout corners of the subframe. . Maybe 3-4 hours for you and 1 for the welder. Hopefully your welder is a buddy...Good luck
 
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