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I've got a stock 1990 RRC. I've heard (somewhere, don't ask where) that if I go with 2-3 inch OME springs I can get away with maybe not needs a ton of extras. I understand I still may need longer brake lines. Is there any truth to this?

How about 2in springs and 1in spacer? Not that I'm going out of my way to go cheap, but I don't want to spend 1500 or so just a lift it a little for bigger tires, etc.
 

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Depends on what you are looking for. Most will agree that 2" springs will work with little additional mods. Most lift springs will be stiffer than the stock spring rate so will ride more harshly. Also due to the increased spring rate the overall length of the spring will generally be close to original springs so the will tend to unseat if you add additional droop travel by installing longer shocks. So you can usually get away with running stock length shock. If you run stock length shock then the stock brake lines should still be okay, since the shocks will be the droop limiter and if not lengthened should stop the axle drop before the brake lines pull taught.

By the time you go 3" you start having some adverse effects on the steering, which may drive the need for different front radius arms (caster correcting). You would likely want to go to longer shocks since you would be setting much closer to the top out point and this may limit droop travel. the longer shocks will dictate the installation of longer brake lines...

I would advise going with the softest spring rate that will accommodate the load you anticipate. A soft spring greatly improves articulation, and ride quality.
 

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While your truck will easily tolerate a 2" lift, what will not tolerate that lift are the universal joints and all of the suspension bushings as you have changed the relationship between these parts and the truck.

I have new bushings in stock.
 

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What size tyre and what kind of use are we talking about here? This has a major bearing on what you should be considering.

Minimal modification would mean just cutting the wheel wells for clearance and leaving the very well engineered stock suspension alone.
 

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what did you end up doing?
Like stated already 2" is not too bad; though i think that stock length shocks have not long for this world in that setup. you could also add a body lift easy; make your own at 1" to gain your 3" lift.
then cut fenders and throw in some 35's!
 

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I had 35"s on mine with a 2" lift and heavy cutting. I didn't like it so took it back to 285/75R26. Much better all round on 33"s and an old, worn 2" OME lift. I found for 90% of the stuff I do I don't miss the extra 1" of clearance the 35"s gave me.

Certainly a skinny 11" or 10" wide 35 tyre would fit better with a low lift height.
 

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roverandom; do you have any photos of your fender cutting job? i am curious because when these 33's wear out i think that i am going to step up to 35's. its probably 2 years out but want to know which direction i would go (more lift or more cutting or some of both), i have trimmed some and would probably add fender flares to make the jump - along with a whole host of axle upgrades. but though i would ask.
 

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This is more or less the most recent picture I have of my old Rangie. I installed flares to tidy it up but it didn't look too bad without. I mostly installed them to help with mud.

I'm also running 30mm wheel spacers with the stock RRC wheels. This gives me my turning circle back after moving up to big tyres but it does move it into the rear door more but away from the shock/inner wheel well. I had tried the 35's on steel wheels with a different offset/backspacing and no spacers but I liked the stock RRC better because they are much lighter and I can run them at low PSI without loosing the bead.

Don't have any photos from when I cut the fenders but IIRC I took it up about 1" past the stock metal "flare" on the wing and quarter panel. The only tricky bit is the door as you end up with a fairly wide gap between the inner and outer door skins. I bent the outer skin over (making relief cuts) welded and used panel sealer to close it up. Fronts were straight forward.

I have OME +2" HD lift springs (old) stock length bilstein shocks and stock height bump stops and I can fully stuff the current 285/75r16 GY Duratrac's in this configuration. I need to be careful in winter when I use chains but 90% of the time I can get away with it.

With the 35's I was close to rubbing often, especially when lots of thick mud stuck to the tyre and there was no chance of using chains.
 

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I'm also using stock 24 spline axles and 3.54:1 gear ratio with ARB air lockers with no issues. But I'm a mechanically sympathetic driver and don't push it when I'm all bound up.
 

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They are off an early 1990's Chevy Lumina Z24 coup, to fit them on the Rangie I turned them sideways. Cost $10 for the pair out of a wrecking yard years ago. They are made of cast aluminum. In winter I made blanking inserts that fit underneath the louvres.


It's one of my favourite mods. I placed them directly over the exhaust manifolds. They work great at low off road speeds. Really reduce underhood temperatures.
 
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