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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks.

Wonderful job you all are doing educating us all on our Landrovers.

I am currently experiencing steering vibration when i break to reduce speed from 70-80 mph or more.

I had changed both front break discs and pad in May 2014. I have looked at the front discs yesterday and they still look good, i didnt notice any un-even wear. The front break pads looked too. however, i changed the front break pads even though they still looked good and were barely 3 months old. But the vibration hasnt stopped.

Any ideas folks.? Thanks in advance for your suggestions.
 

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This can be due to the fact the rotors are warped or have spots on them from heating. Rotors should be lightly turned or replaced at the time of pad fitting.

You can also check into your lower suspension arm bushings and wheel bearings.
 

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Most likely its the rotors as advised above.

But also take a look at the inner and outer tie rods. They may be the cause or be a casualty of warped rotors.
 

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It's because it's just good practice to replace if the rotors are worn anyway. If the rotors are fairly new, which it sounds like they are, then resurfacing is probably a better option. However, if they are old and worn, then they may not have enough thickness left to resurface and even if they do, you already have thinner rotors, then you're removing more material on top of that. This means the rotors have less mass, less ability to absorb heat, and will be even more prone to warping in the future. Personally, I would try to get two sets of brake pads out of one set of rotors, but it just depends on how worn they are (which is a function of your pads, driving style, towing, etc.).

How much of a difference does it make if you touch the brakes lightly vs. stomping on them? Warped rotors should manifest themselves much more with light breaking and not nearly as much with heavy breaking.

The bigger question is, if you determine that the rotors ARE warped, then WHY are they warped? Did you get OEM rotors? If not, I assume they are at least vented (I doubt anybody would make non-vented rotors for the LR3)? If they're not OEM, which brand are they? Which pads did you get? Have you been doing any heavy towing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for your insight @cmb6s. I got OEM rotors and break pads. However, i had a fault break master over a 3 month duration and drove the car that way for that long. This made the brake pedal a bit lower than usual and flabby. This required me applying more pressure than normal to stop the car. My technician mentioned it could be due to my old rotors which were warped. He recommended i change the rotors and pads which i did, but the break pedal remained low and flabby (not firm) after the rotor and pads were changed. I drove the car like this for about a month before going back to my technician who then diagnosed faulty break master. I changed the break master and the breaks improved tremendously. The break pedal is firm and the car stops like it should. However, the steering vibrates as it stops.
This is the history of this problem in a nutshell. And so i am wondering if driving the car for about a month with poor breaks and having to press too hard on the break pedal to stop the car may have caused the rotors to wear.
 

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Ingres,

How hard you press on the brake pedal to stop has no direct correlation with increased rotor wear or with heating them up more than normal. In the end, I assume that the car was stopping at the same rate as before (even though it took more pedal force). This means that at the other end of the brake system, the brake pads were pressing onto the rotor surface with the same force that they were before. If they were pressing more, you would slow down faster.

I suppose it is possible that the faulty brake master cylinder may have resulted in a small amount of pressure being maintained in the system at all times, which would have caused your brakes to be slightly applied at all times. This would cause a great deal of heat as the pads would always be in contact with the rotor surface... even while accelerating. If this is the case, you might even see decreased gas mileage or similar signs that the car is working a little harder to "go". It also means that simply turning your rotors now would solve the problem.

The primary thing that I would look at though is to ask your mechanic if he greased the caliper slide pins when he replaced the pads and rotors. If not (or even if he did), you may want to ask him to regrease the pins to ensure the calipers are floating as they should. You also want to check and make sure that the caliper pistons are moving back and forth correctly and that one of them has not seized (make sure that your piston boots are in good condition and not cracked or split as well).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks @cmb6s.
I've booked an appointment with my mechanic for Saturday. Hopefully i could have this resolved.
Kindly confirm: should i retain the same break pads after i turn the rotors? Or do i need to change break pads?
 

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I don't know. How's that for an answer? :)

It's hard to say without actually looking at the pads. If I am reading your post correctly, then you only drove with the faulty master cylinder and new pads for about a month, correct? If that's the case, I'd have the mechanic take a look at the pads... if they look glazed over (like they have been subjected to too much heat), then replace... if they look like they have appreciable wear or have not worn evenly, then replace. Otherwise, if it were me, I would keep the same pads since you have very few miles on them. I would be interested in hearing other opinions, but I think there is always a trade off between the car functioning perfectly and the amount you want to spend on it. In all likelihood, if the old pads look fine, then they will be okay with the new rotors. That's my $0.02.
 

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Despite popular belief, one does not need to change the pads just because the rotors are resurfaced or replaced. Even if the pads are glazed over, the surface can be sanded to remove the glaze and they will be like new. The mechanic can and should inspect the pads during the work.


Colin
 

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Most shops only replace rotors and pads as one because of the non informed customer not knowing how to seat new pads and complain about noise. I have to take rotors to a parts store ( old time family owned ) to have rotors turned. They only will not turn if under specs. Let your mechanic know you are aware of these problems and he may be more useful as he would feel you are not a complainer.
 

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Most shops only replace rotors and pads as one because of the non informed customer not knowing how to seat new pads
This is a good point. Many modern pads have a special lining that aids in the bedding process. Basically, you don't need to do anything special to bed them in other than drive easy for a while. However, if you've already worn through that lining (which you typically do in the first 500-1000 miles), then you will probably need to go through a special procedure to bed them in yourself. This basically just involves a few braking maneuvers from speed (e.g. drive 60mph and brake down to 10mph, then repeat 5-6 times, but do not come to a complete stop or hold your foot on the brake while stopped as you may build up too much heat). After a couple of minutes, repeat the process again, let the pads cool, and you should be fine.
 
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