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Also, on a another note, I will be doing my rotors and brakes on this vehicle...2006 LR3. I would like to go a bit on the performance side, with minimal brake dust. I see there are some compatible rotors with the holes drilled and ceramic brake pads. Would you kindly review and give some recommendations. Thanks in advance.
It really depends on what you class as a performance brake. For example, brake pads used in race cars are useless when cold, yet they are the ultimate "performance" brakes. Holes and slots give better performance on-road, but fill up with dirt and mud off-road. Brakes are not a one size fits all situation. You need to better identify in what situations you want them to "perform".
For example, in my ute I use a hard pad that will not overheat when being used a lot off-road. They are not particularly good for the first few stops of the day until they get some temp into them. In my wife's disco I use softer pads that give better stopping when cold and around town, but can get too hot off-road.

Then you have to think about all your electronic controls that were designed for the standard brake setup. Like traction control, ABS, hill descent, stability controls, etc. What affect will making dramatic changes to the braking system will have on these. Down here it would actually be illegal to change the braking system on a vehicle with stability control.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
So when I refer to performance, I meant braking with a trailer in tow. I have a construction company and tow a trailer at least once or twice a week. However, I am more interested in minimizing brake dust more than anything. The pads I have on the truck work just fine. The rotors and pads were replaced in 2014, so I would like to be proactive and replace now rather than wait to hear the grinding noise. So I would like some recommendation on pads and rotors that would minimize brake dust.
 

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So when I refer to performance, I meant braking with a trailer in tow. I have a construction company and tow a trailer at least once or twice a week. However, I am more interested in minimizing brake dust more than anything. The pads I have on the truck work just fine. The rotors and pads were replaced in 2014, so I would like to be proactive and replace now rather than wait to hear the grinding noise. So I would like some recommendation on pads and rotors that would minimize brake dust.
usually less dust means harder pads which mean less braking when cold.
What do you have against brake dust?
 

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Then why are you arguing with me that it needs to be replaced?
The map pocket on the door trim on my wife's disco is broken and I should replace it. Does it cause any issues other than an inconvenience.....NO. Would I suggest anyone removing it.......NO. Would I suggest that it is an essential thing to replace...... NO.

The bleed screw comes into the same category. It is just like the 14CUX systems. They didn't have a bleed spot on the heater hose, then they started fitting them, then they stopped fitting them. They can make life easier and if you have one, use it. Can you live without it....... you certainly can.
 

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So when I refer to performance, I meant braking with a trailer in tow. I have a construction company and tow a trailer at least once or twice a week. However, I am more interested in minimizing brake dust more than anything. The pads I have on the truck work just fine. The rotors and pads were replaced in 2014, so I would like to be proactive and replace now rather than wait to hear the grinding noise. So I would like some recommendation on pads and rotors that would minimize brake dust.
The trailer brakes should be handling that task.

If you want quiet and low dust, buy OEM pads from the dealer. The manufacturer builds around customer satisfaction. They don't want a steady stream of customers back at the dealer under warranty complaining about noise and dust. Better braking performance is going to entail increased wear, especially on the rotors, and dust.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Good morning and thanks for the feedback. Got it on the brakes/performance/dust issue. The brakes I have on the LR3 now worked just fine. Also, I found the crack on the T-stat housing, it was on the lower right side where it connects to the engine block. This is where I was seeing the intermittent puff of steam. All is good and thanks again for all your reviews and suggestions.
 

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A couple of parting suggestions:

I would keep a close eye on temps and coolant reservoir levels over the next few weeks. These engines are notorious for losing head gaskets when overheated. With luck, you dodged the bullet and all will be fine. But, if you have a problem, it's better to catch it before it becomes a much bigger one.

I would also recommend one of the multi-gauges that plug into the OBDII port. They have a function that allows you to set an alarm. The temp gauge doesn't begin to move until you're already deep into a problem. The early warning might save you an engine- for under $100.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Good morning. Good point CT090 and Yes, everytime I drive since the replacement of the T-Stat housing, I have been keeping an eye on the gauge. Thanks for the advice for the gauge on the OBDII port. Is this the same as the scanner tool or is there a different gauge you recommend. Any brand name?
 

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Good morning. Good point CT090 and Yes, everytime I drive since the replacement of the T-Stat housing, I have been keeping an eye on the gauge. Thanks for the advice for the gauge on the OBDII port. Is this the same as the scanner tool or is there a different gauge you recommend. Any brand name?
A scan tool is for extracting codes from the engine ECU. The more advanced one's are capable of reading live data coming from various sensors, including temperature.

The gauge I was recommending plugs into the same port and does some of the same things, but its primary purpose is to supply a dynamic readout and warning alarms to the driver.

The one most people on this board recommend and use is this: https://www.scangauge.com/ Another is the Ultragauge.

Rover, as with their previous parent, BMW, uses a gauge that really isn't a gauge. It's an indicator light with a needle. It is not displaying a dynamic readout of the true engine temperature. It sits in the middle once up to operating temperature. Your engine could increase by 20 degrees and the needle won't move. If you popped a lower radiator hose on the highway, you probably wouldn't know until your motor was cooked. The Scangauge gives an audible warning on any input you select at whatever setpoint you choose. I'm not sure, but the LR3 may be able to provide trans temp data. That would be of particular use to you, pulling a trailer.
 

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Hi, everyone

First of all, I love my 2006 Range Rover 4.4 HSE. so far 140000 miles on the one I am using since 2012. Besides the usual maintenance which, I am able to do because of previous mechanical knowledge; I practically have no major problem with it.
I have gone thru the most common codes and even air suspension leaks. Some I come to understand and deal with. I am currently replacing most of the cable: Door, hood, tailgate etc... when they fail

I love the car so much, that I recently purchased another one from a friend with an overheating problem. So far, the radiator seems to be fine. The Thermostat is replaced. There is no leak that I can detect, The car has 147000 on the clock. I am told that the initial problem had to do with the water pump and was replaced.

Symptom: The car will run for 20-30 minutes at normal temperature before the fan accelerates and the temperature gauge starts moving very fast to the red zone." I usually turn off the car by then"

I do my best to bleed the system correctly on a few occasion

I am afraid that I am dealing with a blown head gasket. Any comments or advice will be greatly appreciated.
 

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I want to thank you as well and Ian and the other people who helped with this. I can into the same issue. I had a coolant leak and it was a broken bleed valve. I am not a car guy. I'm the first to admit that cars are an area of expertise that I am sorely lacking in. A friend of mine who is quite handy when it comes to fixing cars came over and we found the broken bleed valve. We replaced it with a brass connection and skipped ordering in the specific Land Rover part. After we got done, it looked like the job was finished so my buddy went home. On my 2nd errand out, the LR3 overheated. I thought perhaps the heat had damaged something else but i came across this thread. It look me several cycles of driving and then "burping" air from the coolant reservoir cap. I have an insulated neoprene glove but I didn't need it. I was careful and I didn't allow any coolant to bubble out and it didn't get too hot because I bleed it slowly. I hadn't tried by heater because we've had a warm spell here in Utah but after reading this thread I turned it on and - sure enough - no hot air. After 3 or 4 cycles, I started feeling hot air. On the final one, it sucked all of the coolant from the reserve reservoir (sorry if that is the wrong term). I added a bit more coolant and ran the cycle one more time to be safe - no air came out. I've drive for over 50 miles running some errands and I am happy to report everything is running smoothly. I really appreciate the time that people take to help out others. We hear a lot about how people don't get along and how divided we are and that may be true in certain areas. But this shows that there are still plenty of people willing to help out one another with no expectation of getting paid or compensated with anything more than those people's appreciation. I know you all have mine. Thanks and I wish you all the best!
 
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