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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

Just ressurected a 97 sd with cloth, zero options, low miles and a 5 speed. Its been sitting about 6 months... Ive had a 5 speed disco before and a IIA, and I've bled the clutch on the IIA and it wasn't much of an issue. This thing is an IQ test im failing though. Symptoms were a spongy clutch, when warm you could barely engage and operate the trans. Decided a clutch bleed and flush was in order. So far I've attempted two 1 man methods. Your basic vacume bleeder attached to the open slave with teflon tape on the threads of the bleed nipple, and the mason jar half full of DOT4 above the clutch master on the bulkhead connected by clear tubing primed and full of fluid and vigorous pumping of clutch pedal. In both cases I've left the master lid off prepared to fill the resevoir.
clues,
once slave bleeder was initially opened dot4 spilled of course and hence zero clutch resistance, makes sense as the system was opened.
using the mason jar method, the clutch pedal movement pushes the tiny bubbles basically back and forth...which makes sense... I mean, intuitively it would be close system, engage clutch, open system on pedal side, close system repeat. I saw someone succesfully simply pump the pedal with a honda using mason jar method...so... I'm just confused.
Using the vacume method, I get lots of big bubbles but zero change in resevoir level, so either I have LOTS of air in the system or a leak somewhere. I know its not at the nipple itself and the threads into the slave housing itself I double teflon taped, and dont see evidence of leaks near the cylinders or the hoses, not that there arent, I just don't see any.

I read a bit about a reverse bleed and am considering attempting this.

Any help would be appreciated, this is a seemingly straightforward job but its turned into a filthy frustrating PITA

Thanks,

Joe
 

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Manual reference may help?

BLEED HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
Service repair no - 33.15.01
Procedure
NOTE: During bleed procedure, keep fluid
reservoir topped up to avoid introducing
air to system. For hydraulic fluid
recommendations. See LUBRICANTS, FLUIDS
AND CAPACITIES, Information, Recommended
Lubricants and Fluids
1. Attach suitable tubing to slave cylinder bleed
screw.
2. Place free end of tube in a glass jar containing
clutch fluid.
3. Loosen bleed screw.
4. Pump clutch pedal, pausing at end of each
stroke, until fluid from tubing is free of air.
Keeping free end of tube below surface of fluid.
5. Hold clutch pedal down, tighten bleed screw.
6. Top up fluid reservoir.
......
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the quick reply, now I feel like an idiot for not searching further.
Since my first pass at this I obviously screwed up by opening the bleed valve and basically let fluid flow freely out for a second... then pumped the clutch, basically sucking air back into the system...
 

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When you opened the bleeder, you were "Gravity Bleeding". If you open the bleeder and let fluid flow, you can usually bleed most of the air out.

That said, EVERY TIME I've had a clutch issue, I've found I was best served by replacing the master, the slave, and all of the plumbing in between.

Then, I use a Motive pressure bleeder and have found it indispensable.
 

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Throwing Money at It
1995 Land Rover Discovery
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For what it's worth, I've never had an R380 bleed normally right away. Every time, I end up with a really short pedal travel, which goes away on its own after a couple of hours.
 
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