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Discussion Starter #1
Surprisingly I don't see a whole lot out there on this, aside from the normal 32mm Sensor insert after the T-pipe. I'm going to be installing a aftermarket temperature sensor on my truck in the next week as I'm putting her back together, and I'm trying to decide where I want to tap in. Again, everyone seems to go after the T up top but I'm wondering if that's the best place, since I currently have full access to the front-end etc (Heads and Front cover are currently off). Where do you guys think is the most ideal place, ease not being a factor right now.
 

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What's the reason for a second temp sensor, in addition to the one installed at the factory and used by the engine management system that, as tyl604 points out, can be monitored via the OBD2 system with any of many, many devices?
 

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very disco
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Maybe the new sensor is refutably more accurate... more precise... or the obd port is required for something else?

color me curious
 

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Surprisingly I don't see a whole lot out there on this, aside from the normal 32mm Sensor insert after the T-pipe. I'm going to be installing a aftermarket temperature sensor on my truck in the next week as I'm putting her back together, and I'm trying to decide where I want to tap in. Again, everyone seems to go after the T up top but I'm wondering if that's the best place, since I currently have full access to the front-end etc (Heads and Front cover are currently off). Where do you guys think is the most ideal place, ease not being a factor right now.
If you want additional engine temp gauge which is not via OBD no need to mess with the coolant hoses, fit one of these: The Sensor Connection EGT Probes Motorsports Sensors and Gauges , you can addapt it to the coin tray

Actually this kind of sensor can save you from a HG failure cos the factory fitted sensor(or other which is in the coolant) will be out of coolant in case of a leak and the reading doesnt rise right away(eventually it drops a bit) then when the coolant gets too low and starts boiling the steam and radiant heat makes the ECT reading to rise which in most cases is too late, i've seen this happening not once. A bolt on sensor like the one in the link will immediately show if the head's temperature is rising so IMO it's a good move to fit one
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You are saying instead of getting one that plugs into the OBD2 socket?
Pretty much the reason Fery states below. I've found factory goes from, "You're doing great! Oh wait, REDLINE #@#$#!" I'm using the OBDII with the factory right now, but I want something that's not going through my ECU and is instead coming straight from the coolant. I'm adding another sensor/gauge at this point, I just need to come to terms 'where' as I'm putting the truck back together over the next week.
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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That's a CHT(cylinder head temp) gauge, i dont know why they named it "pyrometer", as you can see in the link the sensor ia attached to a spark plug so it shows you the head's temp there but you can tighten it under any bolt/screw on the engine where ever you want... that's why i said it's better than one in the top hose which can react too late if the coolant drops and the sensor remains "in the air"
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That's a CHT(cylinder head temp) gauge, i dont know why they named it "pyrometer", as you can see in the link the sensor ia attached to a spark plug so it shows you the head's temp there but you can tighten it under any bolt/screw on the engine where ever you want... that's why i said it's better than one in the top hose which can react too late if the coolant drops and the sensor remains "in the air"
Thanks bro, I think this just solved my issue. I have 2 coin trays (non-smoker) so I'll just get rid of the one that was where the ash-tray was. :)

Cheers,
Michael
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That's a CHT(cylinder head temp) gauge, i dont know why they named it "pyrometer", as you can see in the link the sensor ia attached to a spark plug so it shows you the head's temp there but you can tighten it under any bolt/screw on the engine where ever you want... that's why i said it's better than one in the top hose which can react too late if the coolant drops and the sensor remains "in the air"
Fery - also, are you using this and if so, what alarms did you set? I'm not 100% on what my head temperatures should be - I realize I should now, but that's neither here nor there.
 

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I didnt use the exact same type like i recommended you even though i like it more than what's available in Europe like this Cylinder Head Temperature Gauge Kit and Sensor, CHT. 14mm ... it's tested on diesel and the ring is fitted under the coolant elbow's top bolt and compared with the ECT reading shown by nanocom it shows 1-2 degrees lower so quite accurate... IMO there should not be much difference between the ECT and CHT on a V8 either but you can figure that out by comparing with OBD ECT reading and once you know you can set a proper alarm limit
 

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Question: I have a stock Disco II with Bosch engine and secondary air.
Just rebuilt a bunch of cooling components and I'm going to add one of these Aux temp gauges. I'm using m OBD2 tool to watch live data for now. I'm seeing a temp around between 190 & 203 while in traffic on a hot day with AC on. What would be a "normal" range for temp on my Disco be and where would you set a "high" warning for this new sensor I'll be adding?

Thanks!
 

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Question: I have a stock Disco II with Bosch engine and secondary air.
Just rebuilt a bunch of cooling components and I'm going to add one of these Aux temp gauges. I'm using m OBD2 tool to watch live data for now. I'm seeing a temp around between 190 & 203 while in traffic on a hot day with AC on. What would be a "normal" range for temp on my Disco be and where would you set a "high" warning for this new sensor I'll be adding?

Thanks!
"How hot is too hot?" seems to be a question that has multiple answers around here. Some people get nervous once they start to see temps anywhere over 200, others think somewhere north of 210 is where things start to get too hot. Land Rover apparently thinks "too hot" occurs at 212, as that is when the programming turns on the electric fan in front of the radiator to try to cool things down. After some research and asking a few temp-related questions myself, I would personally start to get nervous at 208-210 or so, and somewhere around there would be where I would personally set a high warning (obviously, these engines don't like excessive heat, so at that point I would try to bring the temperature down to a reasonable level quickly). Keep in mind that higher ambient air temps and higher loads (long hills, towing, hauling, etc) will lead to hotter running, so how you use the truck and the climate of your area will impact what you consider to be the "safe zone". Personally, the "normal" range for me would be 177 (down long hills on cold days) - 205 (hot days, full AC, heavy load), but this might be different for you. If I were you, I would read as much as I can about it and use that info combined with your personal experience of what "normal" has been for you and set a range/warning accordingly. You did say you typically see 190-203, so you might want to use these numbers (+/- a few degrees, maybe 187-205 or something similar) as your "normal" range, and set a high-temp warning another few degrees above that (or something along those lines).
 

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Agree with V50. My stock '99DII runs about 93C to maybe 96C in normal in city driving with the AC on. But if I stop at a long light, it will go up to 100C and up to say 103C. However that scares me so I turn the compressor off at 100C and it will then idle all day at something like 98C. I have already replaced the head gaskets and heads many years ago before I knew anything about the DII overheat problems so I am paranoid about not letting it get too hot.
 

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I get paranoid about it as well, especially since my '03 wasn't well maintained by previous owners (and, being a later 4.6, has more potential heat-related issues than 4.0s). Turning off the AC only drops me down about 2-3 degrees Fahrenheit. When the coolant gets a hot enough to make me nervous, I have found that turning off the AC compressor and bringing the revs up to around 1300-1500 (in Neutral or Park) and holding them there for 30 seconds or so is an effective way to drop temperature quickly , as it speeds up the water pump and increases the speed of the engine-driven mechanical fan, which pulls huge amounts of air. In 75°F (24C) ambient temps, it will drop 2-3 degrees every 15 seconds or so, right down to 195 (91C) if you do it long enough. I do it at long stoplights and on super hot days to avoid crazy high temperatures. Not sure how well it would work in super hot ambient temps, but it does work (slowly) at 90 degrees (32C). I am probably being overly cautious (I have never gotten it over 207 after I put in a 180-degree thermostat), but I'd rather be overly cautious than risk blowing up my engine.
 

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very disco
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Well, you should set your warning at whichever temp YOU care about. If you feel like 205 is too high, and that’s when you’d like to turn off AC and hold high RPM, then that’s when you should set it for.

if LR sets the fan to turn on at 212, then we can assume the temperature will overshoot 212 before the cooling really begins, at which point you may consider setting your warning at 212-215... assuming that LR was right, and that your well-loved engine is still happy at those temps.

ultimately, do what you will be comfortable with!
 

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Excellent reply's. I didn't know that the ECU has the fan come on at 212. I think that's a good danger-zone that I would want to be aware of...... I agree, adding an audible warning (I'm probably going to set it at 210) and just paying attention is key. I'm going to get this Pyrometer and connect it to a bolt on the head somewhere. Anyone know what size they ordered? I saw the 14 mm ID talked about in this thread. Does anyone have this size fitting and/or where did you attach if you didn't use a spark plug?

I have 206,000 miles on her and just had all of the cooling hoses changed after the water pump blew up so I should be good to go for a while I hope ;-)

Thanks Everyone!
 
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