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very disco
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2,802 Posts
There is, sure. If it’s fully deflated you can add a fill valve and pressurize the reservoir yourself, but you’d still have to convince the truck that the EAS was working and operate the valves to inflate the bags. Manually inflating each bag would probably be more work than fixing whatever’s wrong with it
 

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Ruffy
Joined
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3 Posts
Good advice, thanks
Hi,
Saw your post on air suspension.
My drive is an LR3 that is used for Aussie outback travel. As a precaution against compressor failure I have run auxiallary lines from each air shock to where I can access them. Front lines meet under the bonnet (side by side) and rear ones fit nicely into the access hole where trailer sockets live. Each line is terminated in a Schrader type valve that looks like the valve on your car wheel.
Fitting took about a day and was fiddly at the rear end, involving removal of spare wheel and awkward access.
Most specialised airline or hydraulic shops will stock fittings.
I soap-bubble test the lines before each trip, and so far it has been trouble free, surviving one compressor failure.

Good luck,
 

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very disco
Joined
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2,802 Posts
Lol. That’s neat but… seems like a lot more work than replacing a compressor and/or valve blocks!
 

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Ruffy
Joined
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3 Posts
Good advice, thanks
Hi,
Saw your post on air suspension.
My drive is an LR3 that is used for Aussie outback travel. As a precaution against compressor failure I have run auxiallary lines from each air shock to where I can access them. Front lines meet under the bonnet (side by side) and rear ones fit nicely into the access hole where trailer sockets live. Each line is terminated in a Schrader type valve that looks like the valve on your car wheel.
Fitting took about a day and was fiddly at the rear end, involving removal of spare wheel and awkward access.
Most specialised airline or hydraulic shops will stock fittings.
I soap-bubble test the lines before each trip, and so far it has been trouble free, surviving one compressor failure.

Good luck,
Lol. That’s neat but… seems like a lot more work than replacing a compressor and/or valve blocks!
It certainly is more work than swapping out blocks and compressor, but it is also insurance in remote outback regions like the Canning Stock Route.
Worthwhile for peace of mind and a day's work.
 
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