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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The last time I drove the disco it was fine. No lights on, etc.

I parked it at 6:30 pm, locked with the keyless. My wife went to open the disco the next morning, absolutely dead, no juice at all, not even enough to turn on the radio, lights, interior lights.

I went to jump it, and no luck, it would turn over very slowly once, then just clicks. Also, I smelled a burning wire smell emenating from the alternator area. I then promplty stopped trying to jump it, disconnected the pos. side of battery, and let it sit for the holliday.

I bought a digital multimeter over the weekend, and am ready to try and start trouble shooting.

Any ideas where to start?

Initially, I plan on removing the battery, and hooking it up to a trickel charger. It may take a charge, but it not, I will replace the electrolite and recharge.

Thanks for the help!

Kieran
 

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Have your battery charged, perform a load test, if it hold up reinstall the battery and try to start the engine. Make sure to check all connections and grounds. If it starts, have your alternator tested.
Good luck,
Mike J.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wouldn't a dying battery and/or an alternator that is not providing proper return voltage register a trouble light as the voltage drops?

I hope it is so simple, but the burnt wire smell coming from the alternator area is troubling.

Any other thoughts?
 

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Take your alnernator to autozone...they will test it for you...as well as your battery!!!! Just a thought
 

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What year is the truck? Once running, is it OK? Let it sit 'till it cools and see if the alternator is still hot. The regulators can expire and leave the field energized, killing the battery. The alternator will still be warm while everything else is cold if this is the issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have a 98. I have not tried to start it yet. Work is slowing me down!

I tested the battery with the multimeter. It had 7.4 volts. I have it on a trickle charger overnight, and will have it tested tomorrow with a load. I tested the batteries in my other two vehicles, and one had 11 volts, and the other 12.8 volts.

The disco battery did not have the date marked on the top, but the year numbers were 6, 7, 8, 9, 0. I am not sure, but I think this must mean it was sold in 1996, because I bought the vehicle this February, so if the previous owner had bought it in 2005, the years on the top would have been 5,6,7,8,9 . . . or if bought in 2004, they would be 4,5,6,7,8 . . . right?

Assuming the batery takes the charge and passes the load test, I will try your suggestion on the temp test, and have it tested at an autoparts place. I must say however, I would prefer to know how to test it myself with the multimeter, as a parts place has a vested interest in failure results. ha ha

Kieran
 

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k12 said:
I have a 98. I have not tried to start it yet. Work is slowing me down!

I tested the battery with the multimeter. It had 7.4 volts. I have it on a trickle charger overnight, and will have it tested tomorrow with a load. I tested the batteries in my other two vehicles, and one had 11 volts, and the other 12.8 volts.

The disco battery did not have the date marked on the top, but the year numbers were 6, 7, 8, 9, 0. I am not sure, but I think this must mean it was sold in 1996, because I bought the vehicle this February, so if the previous owner had bought it in 2005, the years on the top would have been 5,6,7,8,9 . . . or if bought in 2004, they would be 4,5,6,7,8 . . . right?

Assuming the batery takes the charge and passes the load test, I will try your suggestion on the temp test, and have it tested at an autoparts place. I must say however, I would prefer to know how to test it myself with the multimeter, as a parts place has a vested interest in failure results. ha ha

Kieran

To perform a load test you need the equipment from a shop, they test by pulling an amp load up to around 450 amps to see if the battery cells will hold up, if not the battery is a large paper weight.
Mike J.
 
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