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Okay, I've been through 2 batteries in about 3 months, the first one they sold me the wrong one and it just drained. Went and got the right one and it has been good since I installed it, no problems, it's a duralast gold top, it's the same one that was in there before when I bought it. It was fine driving, no problems, holding power perfectly. Yesterday I go out and I look at my voltmeter I have in the dash and it says 8... it will jump and run fine but an hour later back to 8. I don't think its the alternator but I don't know that else it would be other than it grounding out somewhere. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!
 

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I never read anything about that until just now and to get to it seems like it would be a month long operation if it needs to be replaced. It would make sense since it is really hot in NJ right now. Someone said they pull the fuse on it when they park it and it solves the problem. I don't have ac in my Range but on very hot days I will put the system on low just to get the aux fans turning, so maybe that is the issue. Now i just have to figure out what fuse it is, and hopefully that will fix it.
 

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And reading through the workshop manual now the fuses B7 B8 and B9 are for the compressor and 2 for the radiator fan and fuse C9 is for the entire ac unit. Unless the blower has a fuse/relay on it I dont know which one of those fuses it would be grouped into. Mind you the people saying they had this problem and pulled the fuse are driving Discos but I cant imagine it being much different,
 

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This procedure was posted in this forum before. I highly recommend it because it will help you isolate the issue much more quickly:

There was a thread in 2009 "Finally solved mysterious battery drain!" in which Eric D gave the definitive procedure for diagnosis which I will quote below --

"Testing Alternator and Regulator

Start the engine and run it at about 3000 rpm with all electrical accessories turned off. Set the voltmeter to the DCV scale and measure the voltage between the positive and negative terminals of the battery. Make sure that the tester is connected to clean areas of the terminals. A reading between 13.5 to 14.5 volts indicates a correctly operating system. A reading higher than 14.5 volts most likely indicates a faulty voltage regulator.

A reading below 13.5 volts means that the battery is not being adequately charged because either the regulator or the alternator is faulty. To determine which, keep the car running at about 3000 rpm and turn on all electrical accessories, then check voltage across the battery. A reading that is the same as the first most likely indicates a faulty regulator. A reading that is lower most likely indicates a faulty alternator.

Testing Current Drain

If tests show that the alternator and regulator are operating correctly, but the battery still continually runs down, there may be a short in the electrical system causing a continuous current drain.

To test for current drain, turn off the ignition switch, the radio, and all lights. Disconnect the clock, if so equipped, by removing its fuse. Turn on the switches for the heated rear window and, if applicable, the air conditioning; this will determine if the load reduction relay is faulty. Disconnect the negative (-) cable from the battery and connect a test light between the cable and the negative post. If the test light comes on, some electrical accessory or a short in the electrical system is draining current from the battery. Isolate the faulty circuit by removing and replacing the fuses one at a time. When the test light goes out, the circuit with the short is located. If no fault is found in this way, a fault may exist in the components without fuses, such as the alternator, the starter motor, the ignition system, and the instrument cluster. Disconnect the items one at a time until the test light goes out.

Low level current drain may not be detectable with a test light. If the light does not come on, but a current drain is still suspected, repeat the test using an ammeter set to the 0 to 200 mA range."
 

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Jkleev2: #1 procedure for replacing the unit is a bitch. #2 is a piece of cake: buy a new unit from Atlantic British (About $50 or so) remove the far left plastic vent on cowl. You will see the corroded culprit inside of the cowl. Unbolt/ pay attention to wires. Clip wires and solder new unit in. Done. It's well worth it. ImageUploadedByAutoGuide1372596177.209298.jpg ImageUploadedByAutoGuide1372596224.017871.jpg ImageUploadedByAutoGuide1372596251.513837.jpg


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

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Discussion Starter #7
TexasDiver thanks a lot for all that info man much appreciated. I will definitely got through it.
Deryk I unplugged all the fuses for any fans and cooling yesterday when parked and it still dumped the voltage in a few hours. But if I cant isolate the problem with the procedure he said I will replace that resistor. Thanks for the pics very helpful!
 
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