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U-joints

- Rebuild your current driveshaft with serviceable U-Joints (U-Joints are Napa #344, Centering Kit is Precision #617)
Personally I suggest people not buy ujoints at NAPA as the ones for Land Rovers are made by GMB and don't seem to be as good a quality. Neapco 1-0005 is the best I've found for DII's plus they have the zerk fitting in the end cap which makes it easier to lube a DC. If people don't want to pay the $30 or so for Neapco at a driveline shop, they can get the exact same joint labeled PDQ at Advance Auto. PDQ is Neapco's "vendor" brand and most are not made by Neapco. However, I called Neapco and verified that that particular one is indeed made by Neapco, not an outside vendor.
Many people offer up the Spicer 5.4x for the DII DC but that joint is not made by Spicer. It's made by whoever gives them the best deal.

Also, it should be mentioned (many people don't know it) that upon rebuliding a u-joint, the grease that comes from the factory in them should be replaced with proper in service grease. What comes in the is for manufacturing/assembly/rust prevention and isn't suitable for in service use.

Also, worth mentioning, is many people believe that replacing the non-serviceable u-joints with serviceable u-joint is the answer. It's not. Replacing them with serviceable u-joints and actually servicing them is the answer. If a person isn't going to lube them at the proper interval (I tell people same as oil change for normal use) then they are better off replacing with non-serviceable joint. They will last longer. Also, if they don't do their own service they need to be sure to specifically tell their service person to lube the u-joints. Standard u-joints on them don't have zerks and if the service person isn't told, they may very well assume they are still the non-serviceable type.
 

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Interesting section

With regards to sand driving, of which I have many years experience

SAND DRIVING
"Descend sand hills slowly, low range 2nd, straight down and do not use the brakes as this could cause a roll over. If the vehicle noses in, change to low 3rd, with your foot on the brake and accelerator at the same time."


Good advice but it depends on how steep the hill is, using low range can be a bit of an overkill, high first is fine in some situations. Sometimes on steep declines you can feel the rear end sliding a bit to one side, bit of throttle soon straightens the vehicle and always make sure the wheels are straight of course.


"Never use the brakes except in an extreme emergency."

As previously mentioned this is a bit of an overstatement. Using brakes is fine, just don’t do hard braking.

"If the tyre pressure is decreased by 25% (25 psi), speed should not exceed 48 km/h (30 m/h). If the tire pressure is decreased by 40% (20 psi), speed should not exceed 19 km/h (12 m/h). Exceeding these speeds at low pressure can cause the tires to leave the rim."

If I followed these rules I'd get nowhere fast

I generally run my Disco II and Defender 90 at around 12-13 psi and at speeds of up to 80 KPH. The only time I had a tyre off the rim was with the Defender when the wheel popped into a small hole on a turn and at relatively slow speed.

In really soft stuff momentum and lockers are really helpful and let's not forget to carry something like sand ladders.
 

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Parts Cross Reference

I havent read the entire site....but a good bit of it, and do not see a parts cross reference. I am pretty sure that among this crowd there are some adventurous genius types that have lodged in their head the sure knowledge that a (insert readily available, not necessarily Rover/Lucas, critical spare type item) works great when your (insert obscure part#, 2wk lead time, catastrophic failure item) gives out in the middle of (insert out of the way place name).
Given that these rigs seem to be built to operate in some rather primitive conditions, it seems natural to think that not everything on them is REALLY a dealer item.

If someone could set up a doo-hickey for unloading that knowledge on the rest of us.....thatd be great...yih..great.


Thanking the geniuses in advance...

BS
 

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Roverhound said:
Great leapin' Jebus a tow ball is not a recovery point!
http://www.landroversonly.com/forums/showthread.php?t=16563
I vote we delete the Tech and DIY section before someone gets killed by all this useful advice.
Roverhound, I agree... there is some very wrong info... I am too lazy to read it all and post my objections..... but I think that this is not a good idea on this forum. If you do not know the basics of offroading, then find a local club, take a training course or don't go out......
 

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The Best 4X4XFar
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Roverhound said:
Great leapin' Jebus a tow ball is not a recovery point!
Would you care to expand on the technical reasons why not???

Seriously you have 3 MAJOR organisations in motor sport sanctioning the use of tow balls for recovery points, so I think more than a one line statement is required to justify your claim, either that or retract your statement and delete your post.

The ALRC accept and in many cases even promote the use of tow balls, although often mounted with the bolts vertical.

The ALRC (Association of Land Rover Clubs) is affiliated with the MSA - their website http://www.alrc.co.uk/index.htm

The MSA (Motor Sports Association):

The MSA said:
The MSA is recognised as the sole governing body of motor sport in Great Britain by the world governing body, the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA)

As the governing body, the MSA is responsible for the administration and control of the motor sport rules.

These rules are actually made and amended by the Motor Sports Council, which is the ‘parliament’ of motor sport; while MSA staff act as the ‘civil service.’
MSA website - http://www.msauk.org/site/custom/home/default.asp?chapter=22

I'm going to assume you know who the FIA are?? Anyhow here's their website - http://www.fia.com/index_1024.html

I'm not saying I would personally use a tow ball but faced with the above organisations saying they are ok, who are we to disagree?
 

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300bhp, after your previous quote of the rules, I posted a query on a UK landrover site as to a clarification on why it is allowed. Two things should be noted. Firstly that the standard tow ball is of a different design to those used in Oz and the US. The second point is that some clubs in the UK allow the tow balls for recovery, but not when using a KERR (snatch strap). So I do not believe that your comments are valid for a number of places in the world and therefore not appropriate on a US or international forum.

Here are the comments from your countrymen:

“I think there is a lot of confusion over tow balls.

To clarify :

The majority of towballs used in AUSTRALIA, USA and many other countries consist of a ball and 'neck' or shank which is threaded to fit in a horizontal hole. A single nut is tightened on the shank to hold it down.

THIS TYPE of Tow ball IS NOT suitable for heavy recovery for the reasons stated.

HOWEVER the standard 50mm ISO towball used in UK and other countries, which is a larger cast item secured by TWO very large bolts IS suitable for recovery which is why it is listed as acceptable in many offroad competition regs. Ideally it should be bolted horizontally so that it becomes a ball headed hook. I would not recommend one for snatch recovery when used in the standard 'upright' position though.

It may have a rating of 3.5 Tons, but this is the rated continuous towing capacity. It has a BREAKING strain rating of probably SIX times this amount.

Don't panic if you use a standard UK two bolt towball, BUT make sure the rope doesn't slip off.”

“it's not too surprising that a tow ball could shear when using a snatch strap/KERR a standard 35mm tow ball is only rated to something like 3.5t whereas a KERR is rated to about 12t. “

“Whilst a tow ball is an allowable recovery point, it is far from ideal. The chances of the strap or hook dislodging are high, and the retraction of the rope due to the resulting release of forces could be quite dangerous.

in an emergency they are fine, but if you are going to be needing recovery frequently then you really should have proper recovery points.

As to snatch recoveries- the forces involved are ridiculous, and i would be very very wary of using a snatch recovery on any vehicle unless you are absolutely sure of the the recovery points- there are just too many cases of sever injury from failed snatches to make this type of recovery a safe one in most circumstances! “

“In all seriousness though I was surprised to see how widely used KERR type ropes or snatch straps were used over there. in the UK they aren't that commonly used with most recovery being done with static ropes.

The ALRC rule you quote is for a specific club but holds true for most clubs, however, the recoveries using a tow ball tend to be done with the limitation of the tow ball in mind. The tow ball is a MINIMUM requirement after all. I can't remember what the ALRC rule is for the use of KERR ropes, I have a vague feeling they're not allowed to be used.

Our club doesn't normally allow the use of KERR because our minimum recovery point requirement is a tow ball.”
 

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The Best 4X4XFar
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p76rangie said:
Here are the comments from your countrymen:
Where exactly are all those quotes from?
 

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Does it really matter? Come the end of the day the use of a tow ball has been removed from the section on the forum dealing with recovery points. You may disagree with this, however I do not.
 

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The Best 4X4XFar
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p76rangie said:
Does it really matter? Come the end of the day the use of a tow ball has been removed from the section on the forum dealing with recovery points. You may disagree with this, however I do not.
That wasn't the question.

I'm just intrigued in your source that's all.
 

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Former LR tech, Albany NY
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anybody know how to diagnose a bad injector or regulator.

i can give you guys directions.

or how about heater core orings on a range rover.

or diagnosis of cels and freelander diagnosis.

any requests.
 
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