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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just discovered that I forgot torque the crank pulley before attaching the oil pan. Now I can't use the 2x4 trick to lock the pulley. Does anyone have any ideas on what to do now short of pulling the pan back off? Hopefully this is the last dumb thing I've done on this project.

thanks
 

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certified idiot
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Easiest thing at this point is to pull a plug on a cylider that has just coming up to the compression stroke (take off the valve cover and look for an open intake valve). Feed about 2 to 3ft of 1/4 inch poly rope into the spark plug hole (given your past problems leave at least a ft sticking out :D ) Turn the engine and compress the rope between the head and the piston and just keep tightening to torque. You can the turn the engine back a bit and pull the rope out.
You could jam a prybar into the flywheel teeth but above 80 ft lbs torque you have a chance of chipping a tooth and then you have to pull the engine!
good luck
Barri
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What about removing a bolt from the flywheel (torque converter bolt?) and replacing with a long bolt that would extend through the pan inspection hole? Thus would hold the crank from rotating but would it damage anything?

Or, would it be possible to rent the land rover tool from somewhere ir is there an aftermarket tool?
 

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Columbiar - your way is much preferred. I'm not saying the rope trick wouldn't work, but with the already fragile nature of our heads and valvetrain you don't need to be putting any more strain on them. It's a good way to crack your heads or bend a valve.

Alternatively, you can also put the car into gear and pull the handbrake. That will lock the engine to the transmission and transfer case, and the hand brake on the drive shaft will keep everything from moving.
 

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'03 Disco SE
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90% of automatic transmission cars have a little slot on the shifter bezel where you can insert a key to do a manual override of the brake interlock.

Unfortunately we're in the 10%. Technically you can pull the knob and the shifter surround and get to the interlock solenoid underneath the shifter, but honestly, pull the fuel pump fuse and unplug the starter, turn the ignition to "on" (*NOT START*), step on the brake, and shift into gear.

There's nothing bad that can happen from hooking up the battery with the motor torn down - just be careful. I'm not sure what all you're doing, but it's always good practice to pull the fuel pump fuse to prevent the pump from priming the lines. Similarly it's a good idea to disconnect the starter - you don't want to accidentally bump the key or absent-mindedly turn the car to "START". It shouldn't take you more than 20 minutes to do it right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
90% of automatic transmission cars have a little slot on the shifter bezel where you can insert a key to do a manual override of the brake interlock.

Unfortunately we're in the 10%. Technically you can pull the knob and the shifter surround and get to the interlock solenoid underneath the shifter, but honestly, pull the fuel pump fuse and unplug the starter, turn the ignition to "on" (*NOT START*), step on the brake, and shift into gear.

There's nothing bad that can happen from hooking up the battery with the motor torn down - just be careful. I'm not sure what all you're doing, but it's always good practice to pull the fuel pump fuse to prevent the pump from priming the lines. Similarly it's a good idea to disconnect the starter - you don't want to accidentally bump the key or absent-mindedly turn the car to "START". It shouldn't take you more than 20 minutes to do it right.
Thanks for the advise. I will be trying what you've said.
 

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Just curious as to what your reasoning is to " put in gear"
that is not going to help you in any way with the crank pulley. You are talking automatic trans? That will not lock the engine to the wheels if that's what you are thinking
Best bet will be locking it at the flywheel (such as a long bolt recommended by someone earlier)
I wouldn't even consider the "rope thing"
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just curious as to what your reasoning is to " put in gear"
that is not going to help you in any way with the crank pulley. You are talking automatic trans? That will not lock the engine to the wheels if that's what you are thinking
Best bet will be locking it at the flywheel (such as a long bolt recommended by someone earlier)
I wouldn't even consider the "rope thing"
Yes, it's and auto. Seems like if it was in gear the engine wouldn't turn. Just so I'm clear, you are saying this will not work and the only way to really do this is to use a long bolt in the torque converter to catch against the pan? Any fear that this will unseat the pan in any way?

Thanks.
 

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The only mechanical connection between the engine and the resto of the drivetrain on a automatic trans. Vehicle is the torque converter which is basically a fluid drive. There is no mechanical connection like ther is on a standard trans. ( such as in gear with the clutch out)
Long bolt is the way to go in my opinion
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Boy, the more I try to get ahead, the more goes wrong. I tried to take a torque converter bolt out and it dropped down into the bell housing and lodged up. I can't get to it so I'll have to pull the oil pan.

Question is, can I pull the pan a reattached with the same gasket since it is basically new (just attached the pan a couple weeks ago and has never held oil)? Or, do I need to order a new gasket and put this off for another week or two while it ships?

Thanks.
 
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