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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I have a set (2) of KKK-03 turbos from the old 2000 Audi S4. My thoughts are running wild right now since I was originally going to fab them to my boat. Well.. far too costly since it is a carb setup right now. My thoughts are.. well.. why not try them out on the Disco? Anyone have any insite? (Oh, I also have a set of intercoolers ta boot)

Inquiring minds wanna know.

Thanks all.
 

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That is the piece I am worried about. The plumbing is easy, I am a tad foggy on the ECU issue. How did that guy with the supercharger tune it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
anyone else have any insite or thoughts on this?

(obviously, I have too much time on my hands) ;)
 

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my previous car was a twin turbo. (mind you it was stock twin turbo) I was running a Blitz DSBC Electronic Boost controller with 4 preset boost levels, and an Apexi S-AFC II for air/fuel management. Low boost application to start, and a good A/F computer to make sure if doesn't lean out. Get a decent boost gauge, a decent (volt meter) A/F gauge, fuel computer, and a EGT.
 

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It can be done, but do it properly; don't muck with it. Fitting superchargers or turbo chargers to any engine requires a decent outlay of expendable cash.
A turbocharger will transform any vehicle, in extreme cases they can double the output of your engine however, they generally are tuned for a 30-40% power and torque increase. In doing this they place much greater strain on all components of your engine. The trick is to gain the advantage of increased performance without unduly decreasing the life of your engine.
However, before considering adding a turbo to your engine you need to ensure that your engine is in generally good order. A tired engine and a new turbo is a recipe for trouble. You already have the intercooler so that’s a start.
You will have to first sit down and put pen to paper and decide how much boost you want to run. Anything over 12psi on a stock motor is asking for trouble.
You will also require among other things an engine management system, sometimes called "piggy-back" chips to control you new mods (I use Motec).
Manufacturers by nature set their vehicles up for a "standard" set of operating conditions. For example, all settings are optimised for a throttle opening of say 2100 RPM. The ECU (Electronic Control Unit) is programmed with those settings to cover the fuel air mixture, timing and other characteristics. Chip manufacturers claim that they calibrate their chips right throughout the rev range ensuring optimum performance across the entire operating range of the engine. They are also able to enhance the settings allowing higher fuel/air flow to produce a higher power output from the engine. The chip works "in line" with the engine to ECU communications and re-maps the instructions the ECU sends to the engine as it operates.
Chip manufacturers typically claim a 15 to 30% increase in power and torque. The units are supplied with appropriate connectors to plug the unit into the ECU and also to connect the engine to ECU cable to the chip. Fitting is simple. In use the chip is very impressive. There is a much better engine response, both off boost and on boost and the engine is far more supple and flexible, pulling strongly right throughout the rev range, due to the additional torque. Fuel economy is equal or better than without the chip, depending on how you drive and use all the additional power. Overall, a very good result for an outlay of around $1500. One benefit is the easy removal, if the unit fails or if you sell the vehicle, you can return it to the original specifications quickly and easily.
It can be done, but do it properly; don't muck with it. Fitting superchargers or turbo chargers to any engine requires a decent outlay of expendable cash.
A turbocharger will transform any vehicle, in extreme cases they can double the output of your engine however they generally are tuned for a 30-40% power and torque increase. In doing this they place much greater strain on all components of your engine. The trick is to gain the advantage of increased performance without unduly decreasing the life of your engine.
However, before considering adding a turbo to your engine you need to ensure that your engine is in generally good order. A tired engine and a new turbo is a recipe for trouble. You already have the intercooler so that’s a start.
You will have to first sit down and put pen to paper and decide how much boost you want to run. Anything over 12psi on a stock motor is asking for trouble.
You will also require among other things an engine management system, sometimes called "piggy-back" chips to control you new mods.
Manufacturers by nature set their vehicles up for a "standard" set of operating conditions. For example, all settings are optimised for a throttle opening of say 2100 RPM. The ECU (Electronic Control Unit) is programmed with those settings to cover the fuel air mixture, timing and other characteristics. Chip manufacturers claim that they calibrate their chips right throughout the rev range ensuring optimum performance across the entire operating range of the engine. They are also able to enhance the settings allowing higher fuel/air flow to produce a higher power output from the engine. The chip works "in line" with the engine to ECU communications and re-maps the instructions the ECU sends to the engine as it operates.
Chip manufacturers typically claim a 15 to 30% increase in power and torque. The units are supplied with appropriate connectors to plug the unit into the ECU and also to connect the engine to ECU cable to the chip. Fitting is simple. In use the chip is very impressive. There is a much better engine response, both off boost and on boost and the engine is far more supple and flexible, pulling strongly right throughout the rev range, due to the additional torque. Fuel economy is equal,or better than without the chip, depending on how you drive and use all the additional power. Overall, a very good result for an outlay of around $1500. One benefit is the easy removal, if the unit fails or if you sell the vehicle, you can return it to the original specifications quickly and easily.

If you decide that 12 psi is not enough, the major engine mods will be the order of the day, such as forged pistons etc, and while your doing that I'd have the motor stroked as well.
Good luck.
 

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I would say that the turbos of the Audi might be to small , and you'll have no top end .
those turbos are running on 2.7l mottor . Now I'm assuming that you want to put this on your 4.0l .

In DSM world there is this turbo that comes stock on 95-99 Eclipse . it's called T-25 ( it is and it's not Garret turbo , the exhoust housing is different ) .

So just by thinking about it that turbo drops of making power at likr 4500 -5000 rpms on 2.0l , Now two of them on a 4.0l . Would look like two 2.0l mottors :) .


Flanges for the manifold for the turbo are cheap ( Road Race Engening ) .

You can go a next step and not to wory about $50 used turbos and spending money on rebuild of them , and get an older Mitsu turbo called 14B ( tdo5h ) those go for about $100 and rebuild kits for $100 .

Also the cheap way to get IC's is also from DSM. or Supra Side mount IC's. But the SUpra IC had plastick endtanks and I don't like that . The DSM ( Talon , Eclipse , Laser ) they start from 1990 to 1994 is one size , then they change a bit in 95 . Those also you can get got like $50 each .

IC pipes , JCWhitney that's where I got mine .

Here is a page of the pipes cut to size and powdercoated and my install on my RIP car now http://tsiart02.tripod.com/fmic.htm . I know it dose not look like much , but I was on a budget :) Oh the pipes were only $8 each mandrel bend
 

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I'm not sure I agree. I originally ran an Eaton M62 supercharger which pumped 3.75 psi max, (which was the best it could do) on my 4.7L before I changed it to the Vortech. The M62 is rated for 2L motors and I was quite happy with it. The reason I changed it was because I couldn't cool the intake air sufficiently. It now sits in a box in my garage awaiting resurrection. Therefore, having said all that, I think that the turbo, that 02disco2 wants to use should be adequate.
What sort of pressures were you recording with the turbos?
 

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Turbo

I once thought about pulling the muffler off and mounting a turbo back there. I have seen the remote mounted turbos from a company in Texas. They put them on vehicles from Camaros to Tacomas. The only problem I would see is the plumbing of the air lines to intake and to an air cleaner. You would want to use a smaller turbo to build up the pressure faster too. But to each there own, since someone is going to argue that you need heat to spin the turbo. I would just assume that as long as you have enough pressure the temp of the exhaust is not going to matter when the turbo is mounted farther away.

Here is the website: http://www.ststurbo.com/home
 
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