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Has anyone ever had to replace or fix the suede inserts on the interior door panels? Ours are thrashed (thanks previous owner) and I'm trying to work out if they can be seperate from the door panel once the door panels or removed or if the suede material is simple stuck in place and all we have to do is recover that section with something new and slinky. Any advice most welcome. Thanks.
 

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Sorry, but I've never heard of anyone trying to replace the suede in the panel. I'd probably just try to pick up another entire door panel from someone parting out a truck with the same interior...
:beer:
 

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I have never seen any way to replace them, if you finf something, please get back to us, I need them also.
 

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Use contact glue on both sides the cloth and the material to be put on I will be doing leather. Stick them together before as a test fit. Then stick them together and tuck the edges with the 1/4 over you left. This is how we do it with aftermarket leather hope this helps.
 

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Suede issues

I have been planning on doing this in black, with a matching headliner this winter, can't be that bad. will follow up soon. am going to buy some surplus door cards and practice a bit before hand.:drive:
 

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I have my door panel off to fix my window and decided to give it a good clean. On closer inspection that suede is actually cloth that looks like suede, bummer since mine has been fluffed up and if I remove the fluff it starts to look like a dog with mange.
 

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Hello i have a 03 disco. mine was not glued. i purchased a used door panel. the suade like piece pops off using a flathead screwdriver and popped back on.
 

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Suede Inserts on the door panels

I too am looking for a way to replace those suede inserts. Or I suppose I'd have to get a door panel.
 

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Okay so I just pulled mine apart and it's not easy, but you can separate the alcantara from the main part of the door card with some carful prying. Basically the Alcantara is glue to a plastic / fiber shell which is moulded to fit the main door card. on my 99 Disco II the shell was black, it's import to identify the the shell plastic so you will know where to pry at as there are several layers of material. the best way to get started once you have the door card out is to check the holes where the door pull goes, maybe poke around it with a flat head screw driver so you can identify the shell, then move up to the top edge where the weather stripping sits. on that edge where you can see the different layers of the door card, use something like a panel puller or large flat head screw drive and start prying from behind the shell, if you don't get behind it all you will end up doing is ripping the fabric which isn't what we are looking to do. you don't have to be too careful with the plastic shell cause it's flexible to a degree however the main door card is just hard foam so use caution there. The wider of a tool you use the better, spreads out the force. What you find is that top edge has four evenly spaced plastic clips, each clip has two round bits that sink into the foam of the main door card like a ball and socket, I suppose you could cut them off and just glue the shell back on when you are done, but I found with a little care you can work those ball socket joints out without breaking anything. once all four of those clips are out the rest is easy, the rest of the shell is just held in with a press fit bead lock of sorts around the outside edge, just kinda peals out.

up to this point I have only gotten it pulled apart, I will post again with picture ounce I get it back together again.
 

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There is no fix for this problem, best buy a used door panel.
 

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Alright, I know this is a really old thread, but 7 years later, I have the solution (with pictures!). Like many others, the suede on my door panel inserts was completely worn through and looked horrible. I had leftover fabric from my headliner install, so I thought it would be cool to match the inserts to the headliner, and did not want to shell out for a new door panel when mine are perfectly fine (other than the inserts of course). Re-upholstering these inserts isn't actually all that hard, but does take some time and patience to take it apart and re-assemble it.

Obviously, the first thing to do is to take off your door panel(s). There are many other threads and YouTube videos demonstrating this, so I won't get into it here. But once you have the panel off, you will see on the back side by where the window trim would usually be covering is the obvious exposed edge of where these two pieces are joined together. The insert is not actually glued to the panel; rather, it is a tight interference fit all the way around wherein the insert is tightly pressed into a channel, with clips holding in the top of the insert by where the window seal would be.
So what you want to do first, after you remove the handle by removing the two T15 Torx screws on the back holding it in, is get a small flathead screwdriver and wedge it between the insert and the door panel. There are five clips that you will have to pop out with your screwdriver. Then, get a large flathead that you can use to get behind the insert and pop the rest of the insert out of the panel. Be careful not to crack the insert - it is just plastic (However, it should be noted that I cracked one of mine up quite badly and it didn't end up being a huge problem). Here is a photo of a door panel with the insert removed to give you an idea of where the clips are located and how it goes together:
92090


After you get the insert off, you are going to want to rip off all of the old Alcantara. This is as simple as getting a knife or flathead screwdriver under the old stuff to start to get it up, then pulling it the rest of the way off until you have an insert that looks like the yellow one here:
92092


Now comes the fun part. This yellow stuff is the old padding from the panel, and needs to get removed before the new fabric can be put on. To do this, I used a wire wheel on a cheap Harbor Freight drill I have (to avoid getting foam all over/in my nice drill). This goes nice and quick with the wire wheel, and takes off the foam nicely without harming the plastic backing you want to save. just make sure you do it somewhere where you don't care about having a giant mess:
92093


Now comes the rewarding part: covering it in new fabric. When choosing a fabric (it can be whatever pattern/color you like), try to find something stretchy and easy to work with, as it will help tremendously when you fit it over the insert to avoid lifting and wrinkles in the fabric. I used a woven wool blend fabric, which was super stretchy and worked great. Also make sure to have some automotive headliner or carpet adhesive on hand to glue everything together. I use Permatex stuff in an orange can with a blue top which works pretty well, but strong holding power here isn't as mandatory as a headliner for example, so any headliner adhesive should work just fine. Most of it will be held on with the handle anyway.

To start, lay out your fabric. I was using a 62-inch wide roll of fabric, so I cut off 30 inches of it. This was enough to do all four door panels. Apply your spray adhesive to the insert, and be careful, as it may show through if you go too heavy and have a thin material.
Here is what my setup looked like before I started gluing:
92095


After evenly applying the glue and waiting for it to tack up, slowly roll your fabric on, starting from the top. Make sure to do the lower sections first, then work your way up to the higher sections to avoid having the fabric lift up over the low sections. Make sure to wrap it around the edges, and be careful to avoid folding, creases, and high spots. Once it is on to your liking, you can then cut the fabric off of your large swath. It should look something like this now:
92094


Now, flip it over carefully and inspect to make sure everything is how you want it, and the fabric is stuck all the way to the edges. Then, carefully set it aside and wait about 10-15 minutes for it to dry. Flip the edges over so gravity doesn't pull the edges off for you:
92096


Then, after everything is dry, you can trim the edges of the fabric right up to the edge of your plastic backing.
Now for the really fun part: reassembly. This takes some practice, but is very doable, and I have acquired some good tips. First off, take your insert and clip those five top clips in first. Now you can start to try to press in the sides, working your way towards the bottom. This part takes some finessing. I have found that by sticking a screwdriver in the lip that the insert fits into and prying the screwdriver inwards (towards the insert), it helps seat it. Finish it off with a rubber mallet, and do the same process on the other side.
I found it nearly impossible to get the bottom in properly using this or any other method, so I did my best to get it to seat and then I used the handle to help me. First, cut out the four holes for the handle in the insert. Then, press the handle on with a decent amount of pressure while simultaneously trying to screw the handle on with the T15 Torx screws and a screwdriver this size. Tightening them up will suck the handle, as well as the bottom of the insert, in towards the door panel, seating it. Make sure the sides to not come out while you do this. Don't worry if there is some fabric that is poking out - this will be addressed in the next step.

Now, with everything close to how is should be, there are most likely some pieces of fabric sticking out of the edge. To rectify this, using a combination of a small flathead screwdriver and a putty knife will help push the wayward fabric where it should be. I used a woven pattern, which resulted in a lot of threads that I had to tuck back underneath.
92097

Just work your way around and everything should look great in no time.

Now it was simply a case of installing the door panel back into the truck. Same as any stock door panel, but since mine had some threads that didn't end up under the rubber trim like it should have, I simply took my putty knife and pushed them under the rubber, which solved that problem.

I personally think it looks amazing, and came out better than I could have hoped for, considering I went in blind with no reference material whatsoever. It really spices up the interior, and looks far better than the factory garbage that was falling apart.

As for a time frame, doing this job, including taking off and re-installing every door panel, took me the better part of an entire Saturday. However, it is easily doable with some time and patience, and is super rewarding and allows you to put your own touch on the interior.

Before:
92098


After:
92101


I personally love it, and it ties the wacky headliner together with the rest of the truck.
I tried my hardest to make this easy for you guys to follow, so I hope it is helpful if you plan to do it yourself.
 

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V50_M66,

Great information, thank you. Do you have any information on how to did the headliner? I'd really like to save 500 bucks, which is the quote I'm getting.

Thanks
Sean


P.S. I wonder if anyone thought of dying the existing door material a darker color to hide the imperfections?
 

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I did my headliner for about $75 in parts and many hours of cursing. Might consider paying $500 next time around lol

I wouldn’t dye your inserts unless you want the dye to come off on your clothes /-:
 

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Not a problem - glad I could help.
The headliner isn't bad at all if you don't have rear AC. Far easier than it was in my Volvo. Cost me about $40 in material and adhesive. I have a general, non-technical writeup here (D2 Headliner Install) that gives a little overview of what I did. It's not that hard, and gives you the opportunity to do something interesting and different with the color/pattern. It took me about a day to do, and I honestly enjoyed it. I like this kind of work, so I didn't mind at all. The only part that kind of sucks is taking down the rear overhead console. Not hard, just time consuming and frustrating due to the manner in which LR decided to mount it to the headliner - with little nuts. Cleaning off all the old glue after taking off the old fabric wasn't great either, but isn't that bad. I figured it out as I went with no help from references or writeups, and it went quite smoothly.
Essentially what you do is first remove everything in the headliner (consoles front and rear, that front map holder, sun visors, rear lights, rear trim and headrests if you have a seven seat model, handles, and side trim in the back). Then it comes down pretty much on its own once you take off the B pillar trim. Then you lay the headliner out on a flat surface, take off the sunroof trim, and rip off all of the old fabric. Then clean the glue off by rubbing it off with a gloved hand. Vacuum all of the old glue off the surface. Then lay your material over the headliner as a dry mockup to make sure you have enough. Then take it back off, line up the end of the fabric with the end of the headliner backing, and spray one section with headliner adhesive (I worked front to back, and worked in three sections) and lay out your fabric, making sure to work it into the deep spots and being careful to avoid creases and lifting in low spots. Work all the way to the back, and then cut out the holes and re-assemble everything. It sounds difficult, but is more time consuming and tedious than it is difficult. Just take your time, consult some resources, and you will be fine. I first did this on my Volvo after I got quoted $700 to do it, and it also turned out great. If you get stuck taking it apart, just look up how to take off ____ on YouTube or the forums and it will come apart with no pain. Go slow, take your time, and it should go quite smoothly.
As stated, I wouldn't dye your panels. The dye will get everywhere and it probably won't turn out as well as you hoped. The only solution is either buying a new door card or doing what I did. The benefit to using my method is that you can match the color/pattern you used in the headliner to the panel inserts, and is far cheaper (I did it with leftovers from my headliner project).
 
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