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Discovery 2 Bumper cut/chop. Cheap way to offroad

2445 Views 19 Replies 8 Participants Last post by  Bigmant773
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I am a student low on funds, but nevertheless love working on my Disco. I of course want a steel bumper for a winch so I can go get stuck in the mud, but I need to do a lot more lifeguarding to get that going lol. So, In the meantime I did some simple bumper removal (to take my mind off pinning my slipped liners) and to get a bit more clearance, becoming less susceptible to smashing plastic bits off on the trail. I wanted to post this just so anyone who was thinking of doing something like it can see what it looks like before they take a grinder to their truck. I like the look of the exposed underneath parts and honestly if you’re not well aquatinted with LRs, and just take a glance, you’d see nothing out of the ordinary. I cut along the line above the foglights and then straight across the front, leaving the black bit above the screen piece but cutting/unscrewing the screen and everything below off. Let me know if anyone has done something similar or your opinion on it! Or if you wanna buy my foglights or trim parts!
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to take my mind off pinning my slipped liners
First off, welcome to the forum! There are lots of very knowledgeable folks here who can help with pretty much anything you face!

As someone who purchased a Disco with pinned liners, I do not recommend pinning them. It's a hack fix at best. The block wall is so thin that there's nearly no thread engagement possible for the pins. The guy that did mine installed pins that were too long which fouled the piston skirts and destroyed all the pistons, not to mention put a bunch of metal in the motor. The pins eventually fall out which causes a MASSIVE oil leak and the liners will bang all over again. Additionally, there's no good way to ensure that the liner is "topped out" in the cylinder when you pin it which can lead to frequent head gasket failure. Overall it's not a good solution. It looks like your engine is already out - go do some lifeguarding and start an LS swap! :)

This is a great vehicle to learn to wrench on for sure and they're tons of fun to drive.
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Thanks! And yeah I know, it’s quite the debated subject, but I think it’s the best path for me. Even if it eventually fails, I can probably get a few miles out of it and then can work on getting an LS (or honestly maybe a D1). I’m gonna see how it goes and do my best, to say I at least tried! I’ve gotta have a car that drives now, so I can go get the money to get an engine that will drive tomorrow hahaha. Also our plan consists of sanding/grinding the pins inside the liners so we don’t have to rely on measuring them. We’re also going to do this thing where there’s a wire in the bolt holding it against another bolt rotating in the opposite direction so that it can’t unscrew (or something like that I’m not looking at the blueprints right now). I’ll probably make a few posts on how it ends up!
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Welcome, and congrats!
These engines aren't worth pinning as stated. These engines will run with a slipped liner for tens of thousands of miles. Not worth the risk IMO. Save the money for an LS swap.
Also, if you haven't already, invest in all new cooling system parts (EVERY hose in it, and a new 180 t-stat) . At this age, they will fail, and loss of coolant will strand you (ask me how I know). Hell, the 180 thermostat may keep the liners from moving around, since that usually only happens when it gets hot.
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Already got that done, replaced most messed up hoses and the t stat. Also I’m doing all the work, so pinning the liners is costing only as much as the pins. And yeah it runs pretty good with it slipping but I’m kinda tired of it sounding like a train.
Already got that done, replaced most messed up hoses and the t stat. Also I’m doing all the work, so pinning the liners is costing only as much as the pins. And yeah it runs pretty good with it slipping but I’m kinda tired of it sounding like a train.
Get some noise cancelling headphones LOL
From what I've read, you're more likely to blow up the engine trying to pin it than you are to keep the liners from moving.
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Wow, you're doing all the work yourself? You must be a talented lifeguard! And your old man must not mind you joining these sketchy forums where all the LR weirdos hang out! ;)
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Agree with the above. Skip pinning the liners, it’s a bandaid and these engines will run for a good while with a slipped liner.
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Agree with the above. Skip pinning the liners, it’s a bandaid and these engines will run for a good while with a slipped liner.
Pinning the sleeves is NOT for a backyard mechanic (no offense intended here - I am a backyard mechanic these days). It is very precise. I've "heard" nightmares on pinning the sleeves and as a hobbyist mechanic who takes pride in being able to tear a car apart and put it back together, I would never short-cut a repair that can cause you to be stranded.

Now, on that same token, I do have a close friend who is a competent [LR] mechanic and has rebuilt quite a few of these, including engine swaps and rebuilds. He has successfully pinned the sleeves on a non-04, on his first and only try. The truck has been running for over 2-years now as a daily, with pinned sleeves.

Personally, I won't even do this procedure myself and I would not recommend it. It's not that I don't trust myself. It's we are literally drilling into the block (causing irreversible repair) to stop something (already broken) from causing catastrophic damage. Honestly, IMHO, it's better safe than sorry on this, especially if you are on a shoe-string budget already...
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Thanks for the concern guys but I think we’ve got it, we’re planning on being one of the pinned ones that run. We already rebuilt/replaced just about everything up top except the heads (Crankshaft, timing chain, gears, lifters, rockers, and the rocker shafts). I’m not quite ready to give up on making this thing run the best it can!
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Thanks for the concern guys but I think we’ve got it, we’re planning on being one of the pinned ones that run. We already rebuilt/replaced just about everything up top except the heads (Crankshaft, timing chain, gears, lifters, rockers, and the rocker shafts). I’m not quite ready to give up on making this thing run the best it can!
Personally, I wouldn't risk all the work you've already done, and would highly suggest considering otherwise. However, it is your truck, and if you're comfortable with that risk, that's your call. If you do go forward with pinning the liners, be sure to update us on here - I'm sure many of us are nevertheless curious to the process and outcome of the work.
Good luck!
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Thanks for the concern guys but I think we’ve got it, we’re planning on being one of the pinned ones that run. We already rebuilt/replaced just about everything up top except the heads (Crankshaft, timing chain, gears, lifters, rockers, and the rocker shafts). I’m not quite ready to give up on making this thing run the best it can!
+1 to V50's comment. Take precise notes and keep us posted. Always good to keep tabs on any modifications and their success.

I'm hopeful you are successful and I know more than 1 person who has successfully done this procedure. :)
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This was challenging, but it is done and we are reassembling. Of course, we found more broken stuff along the way. Starter mounting ear was snapped off. Right side motor mount torn. Just add $$$! I'm debating that while I have the pan off, we check big end clearances while we wait for parts. This is great fun on your back under the truck! A few notes on this process. (we used the PDF that is running around out there to get an idea of where to start..Thanks for whoever did that!) We used 1/4-28 stainless set screws that we ground flat and a jam nut, and red permanent Loctite. We measured about 0.3 inch thickness after the holes were drilled, so that leaves about 8 threads in the block/liner. After setting the screw depth by feel, we went in with an inspection camera to check for protrusion. Then, we greased the area and turned the engine 1 revolution and re-checked that there was still grease in the hole area. The inspection camera, I think, is an absolute must if you do this! (BTW, we replaced the camshaft, not the crankshaft!) If this doesn't cure the noise, it has to be a valve guide or valve seat. We checked for exhaust in the coolant, and it is clear. Compression is good and leakdown is OK. Sheesh, is it all worth it?!
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Good writeup. You'll know if it's worth it after driving for awhile.

But yes, I agree. Working on our trucks is a lot of laying on your back. I need a couch under my truck sometimes.
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Weather and time finally aligned and we got it back together. We started it and we heard noises that we had not heard before. Realizing it was kind of cold and we were running 20W-50, we anxiously awaited the magic temperature of about 135. It came and went. the engine quieted down considerably. No tapping! Success! Test drive also succesful! (after a return to base to tighten lug nuts- we painted the wheels while we had it apart and forgot to tighten them!) So, we're going to run a tank of gas through it and change the oil to 10W40 and drive the dang thing!
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20W oil is not an option for the Thor engine... at least not recommended by the builder according to the WsM:
Engine oil - V8 - low compression engine
Use a 10W/40 oil meeting specification ACEA: A2,
and having a viscosity band recommended for the
temperature range of your locality.
Engine oil - V8 - high compression engine
Use a 5W/30 oil meeting specification ACEA: A1,
(API SJ or ILSAC GF2 for USA).
NOTE: ACEA: A2 can be used.
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20W oil is not an option for the Thor engine... at least not recommended by the builder according to the WsM:
Engine oil - V8 - low compression engine
Use a 10W/40 oil meeting specification ACEA: A2,
and having a viscosity band recommended for the
temperature range of your locality.
Engine oil - V8 - high compression engine
Use a 5W/30 oil meeting specification ACEA: A1,
(API SJ or ILSAC GF2 for USA).
NOTE: ACEA: A2 can be used.
View attachment 95372
This. 10W-40 (or in cases of worn engines, 15W-40 Shell Rotella) is the proper oil.
20W oil is not an option for the Thor engine... at least not recommended by the builder according to the WsM:
Engine oil - V8 - low compression engine
Use a 10W/40 oil meeting specification ACEA: A2,
and having a viscosity band recommended for the
temperature range of your locality.
Engine oil - V8 - high compression engine
Use a 5W/30 oil meeting specification ACEA: A1,
(API SJ or ILSAC GF2 for USA).
NOTE: ACEA: A2 can be used.
View attachment 95372
Roger that! We had 20W to troubleshoot. The thought was if it quieted down, it was a valve train issue, not a slipped liner. Result was inconclusive. We were desperate! We'll probably go with 15W/40 Rotella.
20W oil is not an option for the Thor engine... at least not recommended by the builder according to the WsM:
Engine oil - V8 - low compression engine
Use a 10W/40 oil meeting specification ACEA: A2,
and having a viscosity band recommended for the
temperature range of your locality.
Engine oil - V8 - high compression engine
Use a 5W/30 oil meeting specification ACEA: A1,
(API SJ or ILSAC GF2 for USA).
NOTE: ACEA: A2 can be used.
View attachment 95372
At risk of getting the thread off topic, is there a correlation for oil weight and compression ratios? You know… asking for a friend haha
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