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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to Landrover driving and I was driving along the road tonight that was very icey and sludgy, I just traveld at a steady pace but I was wondering if it would have been better to use the diff-locks or the low ratio or is it best to keep it in high ratio without using the diff-lock.

Thanks for any advice.

Ben
 

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Hello, Ben. . . .When the snow gets too deep to drive through, or the Rover is trying to go sideways, use the difflock. When the snow stops the Rover, or you are travelling on long, slow sections, use low range, w/difflock. Do not use your difflock on solid sufaces. Do not use your low range @ high speed. The Rover gives me a great false security, as it travels so well over nearly all surfaces, that I have to continually remind myself that it does not stop well in any. Be careful, get used to your Rover, and enjoy it's abilities. Thank You, LRW
 

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Ben, LRWheelman is right, only use the High Diff when driving at speeds about 30MPH and not on dry roads, but OK if snow or icy roads. And remember, they will go forward, but they do not always stop when braked, it depends on the tires and road conditions. I know, I live in Northern Vermont!
 

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Ben:
The previous replies speak for themselves.
As a standard rule:
Don't drive on flat roads,particularly on expressways in "low range",as you may burn your transfer case.Low range is for extreme/emergency situations most of the time,and usually used for short amounts of time.

BE VERY CAREFUL(I live in Michigan,so I know about it), when driving on moderate snowy roads.There is No "traction control" disable switch.The rover may want to go sideways if turning the steering wheel even slightly and if you push the brakes just in a moderate way.

Carlos
 

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It is interesting to read about your extreme weather conditions . We are used to travelling on dry dusty surfaces in my part of the world, which can turn into very slippery surfaces and even quagmires after rain.
But we use much the same priciples that you do with your snow and ice.
Diff Lock is certainly an asset in these conditions, as traction control, though great on rocky and uneven tracks can be inefficient when sliding around.
Don't envy you your winters at all!!!
Cheers, Lomo
 
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