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Just bought a 2003 with valve train noise oil pressure light on after it warms up and all the fun stuff. I have been reading that the problem with the oil pumps in these is that the dowel pins were improperly located at the factory causing the stress on the oil pump gears breaking the outer ring. My question is if the problem with the oil pump housings is the dowel pins are not properly located then if I buy a new timing cover/oil pump assembly and bolt it up won't the new one have the same problem?
 

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My understanding of the pump gear issue is an internal pump gear issue. Changing the entire front cover or even just changing the pump components should correct it.
 

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From all i have read on the issue, it was a manufacturing defect that affected the engines it happen on fairly quickly. My guess- if it made it 14 years and presumably a bunch of miles, it's not the defect. Your pump is probably either worn out or the ring is cracked. New parts will remedy that--- if that's your problem. If the mains and rods have too much clearance, if the rocker shafts are worn, or if you have a cam bearing problem, the best oil pump out there won't help.
 

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Just bought a 2003 with valve train noise oil pressure light on after it warms up and all the fun stuff. I have been reading that the problem with the oil pumps in these is that the dowel pins were improperly located at the factory causing the stress on the oil pump gears breaking the outer ring. My question is if the problem with the oil pump housings is the dowel pins are not properly located then if I buy a new timing cover/oil pump assembly and bolt it up won't the new one have the same problem?
To answer your question, the dowel-locating issue was with the cover, not the block face. A new cover which included the pump gear assembly is what was replaced under warranty back in the day for those trucks in the VIN range. But like someone else said, all of the vehicles that fell into that VIN range were repaired years ago as the engine wouldn't have made it past 30K before grenading. Your problem has to do with low oil pressure due to a scored and/or cracked pump assembly and would suspect main and rod bearings at this point. Remove front cover to gain the insight. If the portion of the cover surrounding the pump assembly is not scored and the gears are busted then replace gears for $100. If the cover is scarred and the gears are busted you will need to replace both. You can get a used cover for $250 maybe less but the race for the pump must be pristine. If you don't want to take the chance and end up wasting a lot of time you can get the new cover for around $500. If the pump is damaged you will have to remove the bearing caps and make sure the bottom end doesn't need a rebuild. If you only change a faulty pump/cover without inspecting and/or rebuilding faulty main/rod bearings, you will still have oil pressure problems. The entire top-end needs a rebuild. If you didn't get this engine specifically as your rebuild project, and you don't intend to do all of this work yourself, consider finding a new or good-used engine. The whole thing may be trash and rebuild should include new updated flanged and O-ringed cylinder liners too. Deep pockets either way.
 
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