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Discussion Starter #1
I just thought that I would take a moment to explain the path that I took to lift my LR3 for those that may be interested.

One solution that a lot of people seem to like now is the IID tool or something similar. This is a great solution because:
1. You don't even have to get out of the car to change your height.
2. You can do it in about 60 seconds (or quicker if you're skilled).
3. The IID tool is small and easily fits in the glove box. You don't need anything other than the small tool itself (though my iPhone that I already carry with me makes things even easier).

However, the downside to the IID tool is that you must stay within the calibration range of the sensors. For me, that ended up giving me a lift of only 32mm. Realizing that I don't want to go too high because I don't want to stress the CV joints too much, I still didn't think 32mm was much.

An alternative is to purchase shortened height sensor rods. The advantage of these are:
1. Gives you as much lift as you want up to about 2.5"
2. Relatively easy and quick to install after you have done it a few times

However, these also come with a bunch of disadvantages:
1. You need to get under the car to install or remove these. In the garage this is fine, but out on the trail... I don't particularly want to do this.
2. Removing the stock rods was quite difficult to me and I was worried I was going to break the sensor arms. Don't know if the replacement rods will be difficult to remove once they get gunked/grimed up.
3. If you leave the rods on all the time, it's not much fun around the city or in parking garages.

So... I tried to combine the best of both worlds and I purchased some adjustable suspension rods (from Toddco) in addition to the IID tool which I already had. Realizing that the EAS sensors have a calibration range from 150 to 250mm, I wanted to install the suspension height rods as such a length that my calibration of each suspension corner would be approximately 175 (my default before was between 195 and 218 depending on the corner). This would allow me to still lower the suspension with the IID tool by 25mm or so if I want to, but would also give me about 75mm to raise the suspension with "the push of a button (more or less)". It took a lot of fiddling, but I was able to adjust the rod of each wheel to put each calibration value between 174 and 178mm. So, now I can just leave the rods on all the time and the truck rides at stock height. However, when I go out to the trails, I can raise the truck up another 3" if I want by simply punching the button on my iPhone!

I am hoping to upsize my tires to 275/65/18s in the future and while it will require changing the rod lengths and recalibrating again, it should allow me dial in the perfect height again for cruising around town and still allow extra lift with the IID tool on the trail.

All in all, I think it worked out exactly like I wanted and I'm pretty happy with the results! :drink1:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The IID tool is made by GAP Diagnostic. It is just one of many tool options that are available to read/clear faults, flash ecus with new software, calibrate sensors, etc. I chose the IID tool over Faultmate, Hawkeye, etc. because I felt like GAP was very responsive to questions, the tool had a lot of functionality, was being updated with even more functionality in the future, and it was a "mid price point" vs. the competition.

I purchased the Bluetooth version and ordered mine from Island 4x4 who then shipped it overseas. However, I believe Justin @ Lucky8 now carries the tool domestically.

If anybody wants EAS functionality only (and doesn't need to read/clear fault codes or reflash ECUs) at a reduced price, GAP also makes a product called EAS Control.
 

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I just thought that I would take a moment to explain the path that I took to lift my LR3 for those that may be interested.

One solution that a lot of people seem to like now is the IID tool or something similar. This is a great solution because:
1. You don't even have to get out of the car to change your height.
2. You can do it in about 60 seconds (or quicker if you're skilled).
3. The IID tool is small and easily fits in the glove box. You don't need anything other than the small tool itself (though my iPhone that I already carry with me makes things even easier).

However, the downside to the IID tool is that you must stay within the calibration range of the sensors. For me, that ended up giving me a lift of only 32mm. Realizing that I don't want to go too high because I don't want to stress the CV joints too much, I still didn't think 32mm was much.

An alternative is to purchase shortened height sensor rods. The advantage of these are:
1. Gives you as much lift as you want up to about 2.5"
2. Relatively easy and quick to install after you have done it a few times

However, these also come with a bunch of disadvantages:
1. You need to get under the car to install or remove these. In the garage this is fine, but out on the trail... I don't particularly want to do this.
2. Removing the stock rods was quite difficult to me and I was worried I was going to break the sensor arms. Don't know if the replacement rods will be difficult to remove once they get gunked/grimed up.
3. If you leave the rods on all the time, it's not much fun around the city or in parking garages.

So... I tried to combine the best of both worlds and I purchased some adjustable suspension rods (from Toddco) in addition to the IID tool which I already had. Realizing that the EAS sensors have a calibration range from 150 to 250mm, I wanted to install the suspension height rods as such a length that my calibration of each suspension corner would be approximately 175 (my default before was between 195 and 218 depending on the corner). This would allow me to still lower the suspension with the IID tool by 25mm or so if I want to, but would also give me about 75mm to raise the suspension with "the push of a button (more or less)". It took a lot of fiddling, but I was able to adjust the rod of each wheel to put each calibration value between 174 and 178mm. So, now I can just leave the rods on all the time and the truck rides at stock height. However, when I go out to the trails, I can raise the truck up another 3" if I want by simply punching the button on my iPhone!

I am hoping to upsize my tires to 275/65/18s in the future and while it will require changing the rod lengths and recalibrating again, it should allow me dial in the perfect height again for cruising around town and still allow extra lift with the IID tool on the trail.

All in all, I think it worked out exactly like I wanted and I'm pretty happy with the results! :drink1:
Do you recommend using an IID for long term lift solution?
 

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very disco
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On my RRS I run rods full time, but used my nanocom to fine tune the lift.

I don’t really see the need for both unless you have specific expectations. The gap tool or nanocom will let you adjust the trucks height +/- nominal, equal in either direction. Rods will give you roughly 2” lift, and then the tool can adjust you +/- from there
 
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