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Hello all,

new here. Looking into purchasing the above truck for a daily user.

My concerns are: I drive approx. 250km a week at highway speeds 100+km/h, will this engine handle this?

Also, any indication as to fuel consumption I may experience.

Truck has 72k with new engine installed 12k ago, everything else is stock.

Any other advice or things to look for would be greatly appreciated, I'm going to go visit her Monday.

BTW, I'm in Canada and today it's a balmy -4C, been <-20C most of the month.

TIA :wave:
 

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The 2.5 NA diesel is a 68 horsepower motor. Coupled to the Land Rover's low-ratio 5-speed gearbox it isn't too bad.

Top speed is meant to be 65 mph (what's that, about 120 km/h?), but that will be at the engine's maximum speed of 4000 rpm and whilst there's a governor to stop you (in theory) blowing up the engine by going above this, any engine won't take kindly to being run at it's max. speed regularly.

Most NAD drivers (2.25 and 2.5) choose to knock 10mph off their max speed, so you'll be looking at a 'cruise' of 55-60 mph (100-110 km/h), which the engine will cope with fine.

If you want to go a bit faster you can fit the differentials from a Range Rover into the axles which will increase the cruising speed to about 65-70, but at the expense of making acceleration even more glacier-like.

Don't be scared though- the 2.5 NAD is a bomb-proof engine that like all the old Land Rover diesels takes a lot to kill. There's almost nothing to go wrong and in my experience day-to-day reliability is fine.

You can expect about 28 miles/gallon from the engine, but real figures range between 25 and 30 depending on how you drive and what work you're doing.

When looking at an NAD engine, check the breather outlets on top of the rocker cover for oily gunk that gets chucked out the engine- 2.5s are very heavy breathers and are prone to this. It shows that the engine hasn't had it's oil changed as often as it likes (which is every 4000 miles), or the injectors aren't adjusted properly. Same applies to the air filter- check the element for soot and crud breathed the wrong way.

If possible try the engine from a cold start. Heat the glow plugs for 10 seconds, and turn the key with the accelerator fully open- the engine should start briskly without any churning on the starter to get it into life. If it doesn't start like that, the glow plugs need replacing or the starter motor may be tired. On start-up there will be a puff/cloud of black smoke followed by the odd puff of blue as the engine warms up- this should go away. Cold-start performance would be important with a -4 to -20 temp. range ! :)

Under load the engine will produce a 'haze' of black smoke, which is normal (say when going up hills or pulling away with lots of throttle), as is a little puff of black smoke if you 'blip' the throttle, but any other smoke at any other time is not good.

Jack
 

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I don't think you are talking about the same truck.

I use one of these from Suffield as my daily driver in B.C. commuting 60Kms each day on mountain highways.

First let me say I love my truck; but, and it's a big but, it is not an SUV. Top speed is 95-100Km/h and at that speed it is hard to carry on a conversation. The military 110's have a lower ratio, 1.667:1, in the transfer case then civi 110's so they go slower. The engines are good but with highway use they wear out faster and get less fuel economy, 23/mpg is normal for me with all the hills around here. The ex-mod units have no insulation or soundproofing so the ride is rough and they do not have anti-role bars so the handling is not as good as an SUV. The 2.5NA does not like starting in the cold and usually takes some persuasion. However a block heater or coolant heater solves this very well.

The Diffs in a 110 are 3.54:1, I believe that is the same as the Rangie.

Now for the good parts. Nothing beats this truck off road. I have to deal with snow/ice covered roads regularly and nothing slows this beast down and I trust it to get me home no matter what. We had some flooding recently and it didn't even phase the truck driving through 2 feet of water. When things do need to be fixed, it's easey and with the internet parts are easey to find and not too expensive. I've had mine for a year and have been slowly improving it and making it more comfortable, everything and anything has been done for these and the kits, parts or information are always available.

You should get in touch with a local Land Rover club, you'll get a better idea of what it's like to own one of these trucks.
 
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