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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a 7 year old 98/S 1.8 K series Freelander station wagon done 27k only. Has a noticeable vibration between 30/35 MPH! Seems to emanate from the rear.

Had wheels re balanced after flat spots on tyres suspected by garage where I purchased it (changed tyres but did not resolve vibration), official Land Rover dealer say new rear diff is needed!

Can anybody help?

Andy
 

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Hi Andy
Is the vibration only between those speeds?
Is there excess or is the rear diff louder than normal on road?(can you now hear a noise from the rear of the car that was not there before)
Also have you checked the rear propshaf? For uni joint falure.
Is there a clunking when changing gears?
Let us know how you go.
Adam
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Adam

The vibration is noticeable at 32mph and has a pulsing feel to it. Accelerating or decelerating in either neutral, 3rd or 4th gear through 30/35mph tends to bring the vibration on, above or below these speeds it tends to fades away!

It does not seem to come up through the steering column but more from underneath the vehicle to the rear.

Come to think about it there is on occasion a slight lurch and clunk from the gear box from 1st to 2nd (But not often).

The car had been re checked and they have changed 2 wheel bearings but still know joy!

Any answers!

Andy
 

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Andy
I am not a dif expert in any way shape or form but from knowing how they work and what is in there i find it hard to understand how a problem in this area would only causes a vibration at a certain speed. I would be interested to know what the dealer thinks is wrong with diff that would cause this type of vibration just for a learning curve for me as I have never heard of this before. But I have said that I am not an expert.
In my experience a vibration that comes in at certain speeds and under acceleration is most common to be wheel alignment, shock asorbers, wheel balance but as it apears to come from the rear of the vehicle I would grab the rear dirveshaft/propshaft near the joints give it a good hard shake around up down side to side and see if there is any movement. It should be almost as solid as a rock. If there is movement this might explain your problem as propshafts can also cause vibration problems as you get to or pass through certain speeds as this joint fails. The only other thing that I could think of is the bearings but as this has been done and there was no joy. The other bearing that could have damage is the input bearing to the diff itself or the out put bearing from the rear of the gear box. but the wiggle shake test should also show movement there as well. If all this fails I hope someone else has some ideas.
Adam
 

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I tend to agree with 130cc - I have just replaced the rear diff in my Freelander and all the mountings were shot which caused knocking on changing down but never a vibration.

Check - wheel balance

Tyres - can be out of round

The Freelander's tail shaft spins at a relatively high speed and has a heavy viscous coupling on it that requires a huge heavy damper on it to cancel out the vibrations - the workshop manual warns about ensuring the tailshaft remains in balance when being worked on by putting alignment marks on it - so the balance of the shaft is clearly very critical - however I just but in new UJs and a different VC in mine and I had no problems. So if the tyres are OK and all the wheels are in balance - I would be looking at the balance of the tailshaft - are the UJs OK - is the tail shaft CV ok - are the VC bearings OK.

Failing that - wheels bearings but there should be other symptoms or CVs but that is most unlikely.

Other alternatives - engine mountings allowing engine vibration - most unlikely - was a problem in my new disco 10 years ago - vibration at 2500 rpm - fixed with new engine mounts.

Obvios thing first - wheels in balance, tyres out of round (flatspotted), tailshaft balance, wheels bearings/CVs but there would be other symptoms.

Hope this helps

Garry

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok boy's my freelander has been in and they replaced the front and rear prop shaft but still the vibration persisted, so they then replaced the centre viscous coupling and it has done the trick. Thank you for you're help and advise.

Andy
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AndyJelley said:
Ok boy's my freelander has been in and they replaced the front and rear prop shaft but still the vibration persisted, so they then replaced the centre viscous coupling and it has done the trick. Thank you for you're help and advise.

Andy
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Thats great Andy but must have been expensive - did they explain why the VC was causing the vibration.

Garry
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Although the car is 7 years old, Car dealer's in the UK are obliged to give you at least 3 months warranty with a used vehicle, So as I have only had the Freelander for about a month it has cost me nothing (So far).

No there was no mention as to what was actually wrong with the VC.

Thanks Again

Andy
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I have a 2005 Freelander with 53,000 miles. It developed a vibration in the front that came through the steering. The vibration was worse as the speed increased all the way to 65 mph. The vibration only occurred when accelerating, back off on the gas and it was gone.

I thought it was a wheel out of balance. No. Then thought is was the bent rim on the back. No.

Took it to the Rover dealer as I have an extended warranty. They replaced the two front half-shafts with the CV joints. Problem solved and runs smooth as silk. My only cost was $100 deductible. The job would have cost $1700.00.
 
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