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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm attempting to replace the fuel gauge sender unit on my '95 V8 CSW, but after numerous attempts, the float remains fouled on something inside the tank, and the gauge needle remains static on 1/4. Any tips?
 

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I've never done one on a 90, but I'm pretty sure it's the same as on a 110. Once you undo the locking ring, you can withdraw the sender part way, but, then you have to rotate it because of the bends in the sender float rod. There isn't anything for it to hang up on, so you're probabaly not rotating it while withdrawing it.
I guess it goes without saying but you want to do this when you have less than a half tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's out, now I can't get the new one in!!

Thanks TerryS - (Mine's a 1995 110 V8 CSW). OK, I got the sender unit out -the potentiometer contacts were completely worn-out. I connected the new one and checked that the gauge indicates correctly when moving the float lever by hand, which it does.

Now I'm battling to get the new one in! Well, it went in first time, but the gauge didn't move when I filled up. So I pumped most of the fuel back into the front and side reserve fuel tanks, removed the sender unit, verified that it wasn't damaged, and replaced it. And again... And again...! But I can't get it right. I see (with a flashlight) that there are a number of places where the float can get snagged, especially with an empty tank. And when I'm having to do this blind with a few twists before it seats correctly, it appears that chances are slim that I'll ever get it right. And, of course, the float lever may have been inadvertantly bent during the now excessive handling.

I guess I'm heading back to square one!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sender woes continued!

Well, as luck would have it (or not), while tinkering around the fuel tank I smelled fuel and noticed a damp strip along the edge of the scrape plate. So now I have removed the entire tank, and the report from the tank repair guy is that it is corroded through under the scrape plate (more about that in a new thread) and I'll need a new one.

On the bright side, I now have the opportunity to see what gives with the sender unit when I install it before fitting the new tank!

That's the end of my thread (and tether).
 

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I appriciate that this is a very old thread, but I'm having the exact same problem with my Defender 110.

Did you (or anyone else) find out what the problem is? I've tried two different types of sender with different lengths of tube/float arm but the needle still only reads 1/4 of a tank, but it reads a full sweep outside of the tank.
 

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Different boats may have different fuel tanks. The rate at which the level of fuel drops in the tank is directly dependent on the tanks design and the engine(s) fuel consumption. A non-rectangular or irregular shaped tank may cause the surface level of the fuel to drop faster as the fuel level approaches lower levels. These facts need to be taken into consideration before and after the sender installation and use of vessel. It is best to install a fuel tank sender as so to leave a "reserve" or extra amount of fuel in the the fuel tank after the fuel gauge level reads "Zero" or "Empty".

Your vessels running position and ride can cause your fuel gauge to vary in its reading. For example, if your boats bow rides high this can raise the surface level of the fuel in the aft area of your fuel tank. Also, boats that bounce around a lot may experience erratic fuel gauge readings. It is up to the operator or captain of the vessel to understand these variations in the fuel sender and gauge readings as to insure safe vessel operation.
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