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I've been reading through the threads here, and the 1989 model seems to pose some questions. I have just acquired an 89 Classic and am trying to learn the ropes.

1) Mine has exposed front door hinges. If I am correct, this makes it an early production 89.

2) Apparently the 89 could have the B-W or the LT230. Whats the difference and when was the break in the model year?

I'm good with Triumph and Lotus cars, but new to Rovers. Its been a 25 year dream to buy one and project truck it, and I'm there. :)
 

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2) Apparently the 89 could have the B-W or the LT230. Whats the difference and when was the break in the model year?
If your high/low range selector can move sideways to lock the centre diff as well as forward and back to select high/low range, then it is a LT230. If it only has high/low range selection it is most likely a BW box.

But as you have driven it with a broken front axle, it must currently either have the centre diff in the locked position or it is a BW box.
 

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I've been reading through the threads here, and the 1989 model seems to pose some questions. I have just acquired an 89 Classic and am trying to learn the ropes.

1) Mine has exposed front door hinges. If I am correct, this makes it an early production 89.

2) Apparently the 89 could have the B-W or the LT230. Whats the difference and when was the break in the model year?

I'm good with Triumph and Lotus cars, but new to Rovers. Its been a 25 year dream to buy one and project truck it, and I'm there. :)
Your '89 has a Borg Warner. All NAS (North American Spec) Range Rovers were equipped that way.

The Borg Warner is a chain driven transfer case with a viscous coupled center differential whereas the LT230 was gear driven with a manual locking center differential. The switch to the BW was done mainly for two reasons. First, with the introduction of the Discovery at this time it was an attempt to distance the more luxurious Range a Rover from it's less expensive stablemate. The other reason was that the chain driven BW was a quieter, more refined transfer case more befitting a $40K luxury vehicle.

You're also going to find a few other anomalies beyond the exposed hinges. For example, your '89 was unique in that it was the first year for the new fuel injection management system called 14CU. It was an improvement over the earlier 13CU system found in NAS '87's and '88's but did lack the OBDI code reader found in '90-'95 14CUX Range Rovers.

You'll also find that, unless the previous owner did some serious upgrading, your diffs, axles, CV's ect. are all 10 spline. Mid 1993 there was a change over to 24 spline. You're '89 was the last non ABS Range Rover imported into the US with the exception of a very limited number of "Hunter" editions offered in the early '90's. There are even more unique issues with under dash a/c parts relating to your model year but I doubt they are things you'll have to worry about.

My point is that while the all may look alike they are not and you have to be careful in differentiated NAS models from ROW (Rest of the World) models or you'll drive yourself crazy.
 

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Be careful what Paul tells you, particularly around when changes occurred and what vehicles have and have not. He thinks in black and white rather than Land Rover colours.

The BW was introduced with the 89, and hidden hinges were also introduced on the 89.

As you have stated that your vehicle has exposed hinges, it appears that it is not officially a 89 model. Pre-89 models have the LT230 transfer box.

So it appears that the physical description of your vehicle and its model year do not line up. So you will have to physically check what you have rather than rely on guidance from people trying to tell you what was fitted to your vehicle or not.
 

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In the NAS hinges were hidden after VIN KA374641 so, Ian, not all '89 model year NAS Range Rovers had concealed hinges.

However, ALL '89 model year VIN KA) had the Borg Warner. The NAS market was Land Rover's largest. Major changes came with model year changes in the NAS market unlike backwater markets like Australia. Ian how many Range Rovers were sold in Australia during the 1989 model year? Was it more than a few hundred? Maybe that's why the Australian market got such a mixed bag of upgrades.
 

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Yes, do us all a favor and confirm what I've told you. Ian is located in Austalia and falsely believes he is an expert on NAS models. He also thrives on being a troll adding tons of absolute BS to threads.
I do have the NAS RAVE CD and can actually read. I suggest you stop the usual name calling when you are proving wrong and read the manual for a change. Or are you going to try and tell me that NAS Rangies had exposed hinges.

NAS are not completely different models to the rest of the world, there was some very minor differences due to legal requirements in the US for vehicles. There was no law relating to Transfer cases or exposed hinges and in this area the NAS vehicles are exactly the same as other Rangies in the rest of the world.
 

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"Or are you going to try and tell me that NAS Rangies had exposed hinges."

Yes, I am saying that NAS Range Rovers had exposed hinges through VIN KA374641. That means that 1987, 1988 and 1989 models through VIN KA374641 had exposed hinges. Ian, you are not an expert on NAS models so drop it already.
 

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"Or are you going to try and tell me that NAS Rangies had exposed hinges."

Yes, I am saying that NAS Range Rovers had exposed hinges through VIN KA374641. That means that 1987, 1988 and 1989 models through VIN KA374641 had exposed hinges. Ian, you are not an expert on NAS models so drop it already.
He knows what he needs to check, so arguing with you is not going to progress this thread. I already know that pointing out your errors only results in name calling, so I will let you have the last post like usual.
 

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Ian's right. Check your Range Rover. If it has a VIN that has KA in it, it is most definitely a 1989 model year vehicle. DOT has laws here in the US about things like VIN's, something Ian can't quite grasp. Now, if it has a VIN with a KA prefix we know it's an '89 model year. You've already stated is has exposed hinges and you're correct in that the early '89 imports, typically built in the summer and fall of 1988 had exposed hinges.

Finally, please confirm for all of us the shape of the shift pattern in your transfer case. If it only goes from hi to N to lo it is a Borg Warner. I have no doubt that if the VIN is a KA, it will be a Borg Warner. The ONLY way it would be otherwise is if the previous owner decided to swap out a failing BW for an LT230. If, in fact, someone did swap cases, as has been common in recent years with ever increasing numbers of BW couplers seizing, then the shift pattern would be an H with hi and lo open diff to the right and hi and lo lock to the left. Frequently, when such a swap was performed, in order to give the shifter enough room for the H pattern, the console was modified as well with a larger hole cut around the shifter.

I'm sorry that this thread is devolving into a pissing match but this is what ALWAYS happens with Ian. If you're on this board for awhile, you'll see this is the case. Yes, Ian, you are an interminable windbag. That's not name calling, that's a fact.
 

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If it only goes from hi to N to lo it is a Borg Warner. I have no doubt that if the VIN is a KA, it will be a Borg Warner. The ONLY way it would be otherwise is if the previous owner decided to swap out a failing BW for an LT230.
Having a bet each way are you. So if it doesn't have a BW someone must have changed it. And it is only the "K" that is the year of the vehicle, the 'A" is where it was made.
 

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No, Ian, not a bet either way. NAS Range Rovers in model year '89 signified by the K in the VIN had BW's. I don't care what your mystical readings in the RAVE say. Not unlike your ridiculous claims about NAS DI's in the last thread you made a fool of yourself on, you make these claims of reading things in the RAVE but never post links.

I mentioned the fact that the swap to the BW was not uncommon here in the NAS market as I've probable sold conversion kits to 50 or more Range Rover owners' many who owned '89's with bad BW's.

Interminable, incessant and wrong, Ian. On this you are wrong.
 

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Ian how many Range Rovers were sold in Australia during the 1989 model year? Was it more than a few hundred? Maybe that's why the Australian market got such a mixed bag of upgrades.
You just love stating things without researching them first. Australia was the largest market for Land Rover outside the UK. It took the US 16 years to even realise that Range Rover existed and you have been stuffing it up for the rest of us ever since. For example, it was only the US requirements that made Land Rover weld up the frame of the Rangie in 1986, Since then it has been a lot harder to change parts of the car, particularly where rust is a problem like the US. The US market is so large for Land Rover that it was not worth them changing the defender to met US requirements, but the rest of us have continue to buy and enjoy them. Yep, we are a backward market and only get the world's scraps.
 

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Not unlike your ridiculous claims about NAS DI's in the last thread you made a fool of yourself on
Did you really think that you won that argument :lol::dunno:

I am sorry now that your stupidity suckers me into your posts. You are on this forum to sell parts from Rovers that you wreck, so please stick to that and not on how to put them together or fix them.

Won't waste anymore time on this thread.
 

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Did you really think that you won that argument :lol::dunno:
Well, I've yet to see anyone EVER speak of an NAS DI with a 14CUX AND a 10AS alarm box with a corresponding spider.

In a nutshell, your comment about winning is at the root of your problem. You have to win whenever you post up. You also NEED to have the final word. This is about trying to help someone here in the NAS market identify their ROVER. All you're doing here and on other threads, is muddy the waters.

Let it drop Ian. Enough already. He now has a VIN range for confirming the model year of his vehicle. He has clear instructions about identifying his transfer case and a list of other unique features about his Range Rover.
 

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"For example, it was only the US requirements that made Land Rover weld up the frame of the Rangie in 1986"

Oh, yeah, what a terrible thing it is to require that chassis parts be welded. Shame on us (US).

"The US market is so large for Land Rover that it was not worth them changing the defender to met US requirements, but the rest of us have continue to buy and enjoy them."

I don't even know what you're trying to say about Defenders but I do know that when they were first introduced (I was one of the first people in the US to put money down on a D90 in December of 1992) the demand DID NOT keep up with supply. As a regular at dealerships from 1993-1998 I saw D90's languish on the showroom floors of several northeast dealerships. The vehicle was not important enough for the NAS market. Rover did the mods they needed to but beyond serving as a statement for Rover, the Defender was imported in such small numbers that it wasn't worthwhile to do the massive conversion necessary for it to meet DOT requirements past 1997.
 
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