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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With all the snow so far this year I'm starting a search for a winter SUV... My daily driver ( Porsche 968) is a REAL sled ....I bought my son a " 98 LR Discivery LSE last summer and he loves it. He has had no problem so far and no trouble getting around in Kansas City snow ... I've looked at a couple of "02 and "03 Discs. Other than the lights, are there other significant differances??? I know that the latest model should be better, but the early Series II all seem to have about the same price/condition/miles. I'd like to know the changes for the differant years. I've looked at several sites but none have any specific information... Thanks for any info....

PFZ
 

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http://www.disco2.com/

He has good information on evolution of Disco in Tech section.

If you do not plan on doing any real serious off-roading then it probably doesn't matter much whether you get a D1, D2, or what year D2. You might consider a Range Rover, too if you can find a deal on one. Major issues there with me would be mileage and condition of vehicle, price. If you can get one with an extended warranty that would be a major plus as they can be expensive when they break.

The most major change between D2 year models (other than headlights) is:

99, 00, 01 year models have nipple on transfer case to activate CDL, but the linkage will not activate it. You either have to crawl under to activate it with a wrench, or install linkage or solenoid to activate from inside.

Some late 01's, 02 and 03 year models do not have the nipple on the transfer case. This means no way you can lock the center differential - period.

04's have the nipple on the transfer case and the linkage is installed so you can activate from inside like on a D1. Were I to buy another D2, I'd go for an 04 personally due to the CDL and I like the front end a lot better.

What this means to me is:

1. You may decrease your audience when you sell one without the nipple for the CDL. Anyone who off-roads will most likely want a D2 they can activate the CDL on. This means get a 99, 00, 01 (with nipple), or 04.

2. Regardless if you off-road or not, having one with a CDL you can activate is nice if you have to remove a driveshaft. On one with no CDL if you take either driveshaft off, you aren't going to move one inch. If you have one with a lockable CDL, you can remove a driveshaft, lock the CDL and still drive the vehicle.

3. If you plan on serious off-roading, most likely sooner or later you'll probaby want to be able to lock the CDL.

Other major change is going from 4.0 to 4.6 litre engine, which is a noticable difference in power.


Regards,
JH
 

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I dont know any detailed changes off the top of my head but I can tell you right off, a DII is different enough from a DI....with the many small differences. Stuff like the DII wider wheelbase, buick engine, BMW tranny (I think LT250 is BMW 750i tranny?), only one rotoflex on rear driveshaft (means can do 3" lift w/o new driveshaft), larger/different wheel wells (less cutting to fit 265/75-16's), there are less aftermarket parts for DII's, stiffer seats (DI has very comfortable seats.....), internal radio antenna, a bumper thats harder to cut for clearance, no stock ablility to lock the center differential (except for 04'), door handles are now handles instead of latches....small stuff for the most part....but it adds up.

These are year by year changes on the Disco II:

"2000 Land Rover Discovery II: Addition of an integrated compass to the rearview mirror was the only notable change for 2000. A new fuel-filler-door indicator went on the instrument panel. Ford bought Land Rover from BMW this year.

2001 Land Rover Discovery II: For 2001, the Discovery reverted to three trim levels--SD, LE and top-line SE. Adding the optional 3rd-row seating changed badging to SD7, LE7, or SE7. An optional SE/SE7 performance package included 18-inch wheels and Active Cornering Enhancement. A rear self-leveling suspension was standard in "7" models, and available for the LE and SE. Leather interior trim was standard for the SE/SE7. A new 10-speaker, 220-watt premium audio system became available this year.

2002 Land Rover Discovery II: A new top-line HSE edition with DVD-based entertainment and navigation systems debuted this year, joining the base SD and midline SE. The LE model was gone. An optional Suspension Package for the SE/HSE added Active Cornering Enhancement. A rear self-leveling suspension was standard on seven-passenger models. Leather upholstery was standard on the SE and HSE, along with 18-inch wheels (versus 16-inch for the SD). A limited-production Kalahari off-road edition went on sale later in the year.

2003 Land Rover Discovery II: A 217-hp 4.6-liter V8 replaced the 4.0 V8. The grille, headlamps, and front bumper were restyled for '03, and instrument graphics were also revised. A rear-obstacle-detection system was new and exclusive to the HSE.

2004 Land Rover Discovery II: In 2004, Land Rover produced 200 limited-edition G4 Editions, named for the Land Rover sponsored off-road challenge. The G4 is orange and includes self-leveling suspension, front brush bar, rear access ladder, and lamp guards. Also new in '04 is a driver-activated locking center differential.", http://auto.consumerguide.com/Auto/Used/reviews/full/index.cfm/id/2458/act/usedcarreviewshowall


Hope this helps.

I suggest either an 99-01 or 04, during 02-03 they took out the center locking differential nut on the transfer case.....so you cant use the center diff if you ever wanted to.
 

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Actually- the length in the DII is increased behind the rear wheels- longer booty. The engine is not a Buick as stated before- The engine tooling was originally from Buick decades ago, but it's not a "Buick engine" anymore as they aren't purchased from or made by Buick. The LT230 is a transfer case, not a BMW transmission. The transmission in the Discovery is a ZF- very nice stuff. The driveshafts have a single rotoflex instead of u-joints which limits suspension lifting to 2" or so before having to convert. No such thing as a multi-rotoflex drive shaft. :dunno:
The most important thing in foul weather is the traction control. The DII traction control will make it a better driver on snowy roads than a DI without traction control. The 03/04 both have a 4.6 engine which is superior to the previous years.
Range Rover depreciate like bricks, I'd seriously look into used Range Rovers too. The Discovery is a nice way to go for an off-road toy, but for a foul weather on-road machine I'd go for a Rangie instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all for the info... I've looked at the RR also, but between my wife and I we really need a comfortable "hauler".. No off-road, just normal all-round driving and some light hauling of junk and my wife's garden supplies. I might have to use it to pull a car-trailer. I know I can't pull a 42ft enclosed trailer, but maybe a light open race trailer if I have to...It definitely would not be the primary puller !!! I just need an " all-round", all weather truck. I've got access to several pick'em-ups if I need one. My "second" job is as a "team enginner" for a VanDamien FC. We will be competing for a national SCCA title this year so I might need something I can take on the road for 8-10 races. There is no such thing as not enough redundency !!!! We had to replace one caliper on the FORD F-200 in the pits last race at Gateway. ( pads completely GONE and leaking like an open faucet !!). If called upon, the Disco CAN server to pull the trailer !!

I enjoyed driving my son's truck "98 for a couple of months last winter. I was really impressed with it . From what I've learned, the "03/"04 is just what I'm looking for. It will be used as a third ( forth,fifth,ect) car in the family. Has the reliability increased with the newer models?? Any change with build quality with Ford or BMW enginering ????? Who designed the 4.6 lt engine?? Is it a enlarged 4.0lt, or a "new" engine ??? Anyone know of new internals,ect ??? I have no interest in off-roading, plus not much chance here in Midwest !! All I need is a large, comfortable, solid truck.. The Discovery seems to fit the bill..

As an aside, my cousin was a GM lead enginneer and worked on the BOP 6cyl INDY engine developement when it was used for racing. Isn't that the same ( but 6cyl) design that GM sold to Rover??? I remember WAY BACK when the deal was done. I think the 6cyl was used in the Rover 2000 which ended up as a rather successful sedan racer..Can't remember that engine after that. Believe it was used in a couple of English sports car and the MGC. Is there any shops in UK that develope mods for it ?? Any in the US ??

Enough rambling on... Thanks for the info so far..

PFZ
 

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Muddy Oval said:
Actually- the length in the DII is increased behind the rear wheels- longer booty. The engine is not a Buick as stated before- The engine tooling was originally from Buick decades ago, but it's not a "Buick engine" anymore as they aren't purchased from or made by Buick. The LT230 is a transfer case, not a BMW transmission. The transmission in the Discovery is a ZF- very nice stuff. The driveshafts have a single rotoflex instead of u-joints which limits suspension lifting to 2" or so before having to convert. No such thing as a multi-rotoflex drive shaft. :dunno:
The most important thing in foul weather is the traction control. The DII traction control will make it a better driver on snowy roads than a DI without traction control. The 03/04 both have a 4.6 engine which is superior to the previous years.
Range Rover depreciate like bricks, I'd seriously look into used Range Rovers too. The Discovery is a nice way to go for an off-road toy, but for a foul weather on-road machine I'd go for a Rangie instead.

I have to clear up some stuff so I dont sound completly stupid. Sry.....thats right transfer case....not tranny. I was thinking transfer case when I was typing, but dang......oh and LT230....not 250 *check* Meant rotoflex on only one of the two driveshafts... Didnt know if it was or wasnt a buick engine....ive heard something about it was so perhaps that was it.

I guess Ill leave that last post and just eat my pride. :bawling:
 

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s'ok- sometimes my fingers get ahead of my brain too.

If you're gonna tow- get an 03/04 with the 4.6. The 4.6 is a continuation of the same series of Rover V8's that started decades ago. The 4.6 short block is commonly put in older Rovers too- The HP and torque come in VERY handy when towing. I tow an enclosed race trailer with both of my 04 Discos and they do an acceptable job at it. I towed the trailer with a 72 Range Rover in it on a 14 hour drive and it did surprisingly well... my race car weighs less than half what my Rangie does, so towing that thing is cake. One of my Discos has SLS and it makes towing SO much mo better.

The Disco was mostly untouched by BMW and doesn't carry any of the BMW traits that were introduced into some of the other models. They new it was going to discontinue, so they just did some updates but didn't put a lot of engineering into the last of the Disco IIs. The CDL for the 04 was a great way to go out with a bang though...
 
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