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I have stuck with 5x30, have considered 10x30 but did not change. For what purpose are you considering changing viscosity?

I'm using Royal Purple 5x30.
 

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That doesn't really answer the question of what you are trying to accomplish and why. By the way, there is an Oil Cooler/Warmer on the vehicle, so regardless of external conditions it will behave the same.

The manual suggests; So I wouldn't presume to know more than the Jaguar engineers that designed the engine.

Service Manual States;
* Recommended Lubricant
The use of 5W/30 oil to Specification WSS - M2C913-B is preferred. Where oil to this specification
is not available, then 5W/30 oil meeting specifications ACEA A1/A3 or API SJ or SL may be used.

Owners Manual States;
Use only oils ’Certified for Gasoline Engines’ by the American Petroleum Institute (API). To
protect your engine’s warranty, use an SAE 5W/30 oil meeting specification
WSS-M2C205-A (GF3).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Since our other vehicles can use a 5w-40 oil I thought it would work in our LR3 as well. The temperatures here can range from -25 to 100+ and I like the idea of having a slightly heavier oil for the warmer temperatures while having the 5w rating for when it's cold out. I was planning on using Shell Rotella T6 5w-40 synthetic.
 

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If you carefully inspect your oil filter assembly. You will see that the engine coolant is filtered through the housing around it. I imagine in cold temps, it helps the warm up, and in warm temperatures it helps keep it cool.

I prefer RP though. Shell or Mobile is also well respected.
 

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That's a nice graph, however it is in Celsius. Easy enough to run a conversion. Do you have a reliable source for it?

Motor Oil Viscosity

I'll quote, and stand corrected... However, go view the article.

Multi-viscosity grade oils have a wide viscosity range which is indicated by a two-number rating. Popular multi-viscosity grades today include 0W-20, 0W-40, 5W-20, 5W-30, 10W-30, 10W-40 and 20W-50. The first number with the "W" refers to the oil's cold temperature viscosity rating, while the second number refers to the oil's high temperature viscosity rating.

Note: Motor oils that have a wider range viscosity rating such a 5W-30, 5W-40 and 0W-40 are blended with more base stocks and additives. Because of this, it may be harder for a wider range oil to remain in grade as the miles accumulate (which is why GM does NOT recommend using 10W-40 motor oil. They say it breaks down too quickly and does not say in grade as long as 10W-30 or 5W-30. Also, an oil with a lower winter rating like 0W-20 or 5W-20 will contain a higher percentage of thinner base stock oil (which is typically a synthetic oil). This requires more viscosity improver additive to achieve a the same high temperature rating as a 10W-30, 10W-40 or straight 30 or 40 weight oil.

Most vehicle manufacturers today specify 5W-20 or 5W-30 for newer vehicles for year-round driving. Some European car makes also specify 0W-20, 0W-30, 0W-40 or 5W-40 for their vehicles. Always refer to the vehicle owners manual for specific oil viscosity recommendations, or markings on the oil filler cap or dipstick.

Always use the motor oil viscosity recommended by your vehicle manufacturer. Using a different viscosity (thinner or thicker) may cause oil pressure and oil supply problems, especially in late model engines with cylinder deactivation and/or variable valve timing (VVT).

As a rule, overhead cam (OHC) engines typically require thinner oils such as 5W-30 or 5W-20 to speed lubrication of the overhead cam(s) and valve-train when the engine is first started. Pushrod engines, by comparison, typically specify 5W-30, 10W-30 or 10W-40.
 

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English vehicle English chart ;)

Take the Celsius temperature (example 20c)
Double it (40)
Add 32
Fahrenheit 72 (not exact but very close for weather temperatures)
Works for above zero temperature and below zero is just cold or really dam cold ;)

I am another vote for sticking with the correct grade and don't switch for convenience only
 
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I think I'm going to stick with the 5-30 just to be safe. It was mentioned above about the VVT and oil pressure. Since the manual doesn't give any other options like our DII did I'm going to continue to use the 5-30.
I am not sure why you would be worried about using a better oil in your motor. Cheap oils usually have the closer numbers between the hot and cold ratings. a 5W is going to act the same at cold temperatures no matter what the hot rating is. It just means that the higher hot rating will protect the motor better at the higher temps.

The 5W/40 rating can usually only be obtained in a full synthetic oil, which is a lot more expensive. So that is why the manufacturer specifies a 5W/30 as that is the most common you will get in a cheaper mineral oil.

It is strange to me that you would pick the cheaper oil with less protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I am not sure why you would be worried about using a better oil in your motor. Cheap oils usually have the closer numbers between the hot and cold ratings. a 5W is going to act the same at cold temperatures no matter what the hot rating is. It just means that the higher hot rating will protect the motor better at the higher temps.

The 5W/40 rating can usually only be obtained in a full synthetic oil, which is a lot more expensive. So that is why the manufacturer specifies a 5W/30 as that is the most common you will get in a cheaper mineral oil.

It is strange to me that you would pick the cheaper oil with less protection.
I would still use a full synthetic 5w-30 so the price would be about the same as the 5w-40 oil.
"Always use the motor oil viscosity recommended by your vehicle manufacturer. Using a different viscosity (thinner or thicker) may cause oil pressure and oil supply problems, especially in late model engines with cylinder deactivation and/or variable valve timing (VVT).

As a rule, overhead cam (OHC) engines typically require thinner oils such as 5W-30 or 5W-20 to speed lubrication of the overhead cam(s) and valve-train when the engine is first started. Pushrod engines, by comparison, typically specify 5W-30, 10W-30 or 10W-40."
The above quote is why I was going to use the 5-30. Don't know if the heavier 5-40 would cause problems with the VVT?
 

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Using a different viscosity (thinner or thicker) may cause oil pressure and oil supply problems, especially in late model engines with cylinder deactivation and/or variable valve timing (VVT).

As a rule, overhead cam (OHC) engines typically require thinner oils such as 5W-30 or 5W-20 to speed lubrication of the overhead cam(s) and valve-train when the engine is first started. Pushrod engines, by comparison, typically specify 5W-30, 10W-30 or 10W-40."
The above quote is why I was going to use the 5-30. Don't know if the heavier 5-40 would cause problems with the VVT?
How is a 5W/40 any thicker or heavier when cold compared to a 5W/30?

They both have the same cold viscosity rating, therefore they have the same "thickness" when you start up your car.

If you actually look up the specs on any 5W/40 oil, it will state that it is suitable to use where a 5W/30 oil is specified.

As cnfowler posted above, 30 weight oil is only good in ambient temps up to the low 30's C. It is not suitable for use where I live where the summer temps regularly get into the mid to high 30's and sometimes in the low 40's.

So if you live in an area where the temps get above 90F, then you really should not be using a 30 weight oil.

I am not sure if you understand what the hot rating is. Any oil gets thinner as it is heated up. The hot viscosity number is obtained at relatively hot temperatures. Hotter than what your car is ever likely to run at.

So the oil, as it warms up, will have a viscosity well below the 5W when cold. The higher viscosity number listed for the oil simply indicates that it thins less than what you would expect a 5W oil to thin. What the higher number simply means is that at the high temps the oil is the same viscosity as a 30 or 40 weight oil heated to that temperature would have. Not that it has a 30 or 40 viscosity at those temps.

It no way implies that the oil somehow gets thicker as it is heated. By the time it reaches that temperature, it will be significantly thinner than the 5W oil when cold. But you do not want it to thin too much as it will not protect your engine as well. So a 5W/40 will protect your motor better at higher operating temps than a 5W/30 oil. At colder temps there is going to be little or no difference in viscosity between the two oils.

As I have stated before, the only reason they specify a 5W/30 is that it is cheaper and easier to come by than a 5W/40. But you get what you pay for. I always use the oil with the highest hot rating while sticking with the proper cold rating. But I am just fussy about protecting my engines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I realize that the oil doesn't get thicker as it heats up but a 5W/40 oil will be thicker once heated than a 5W/30 will be correct? If so than the engine is pumping a heavier oil throughout it and I didn't know if this would cause cause problems with the VVT system of the 4.4L engine.
 

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I realize that the oil doesn't get thicker as it heats up but a 5W/40 oil will be thicker once heated than a 5W/30 will be correct? If so than the engine is pumping a heavier oil throughout it and I didn't know if this would cause cause problems with the VVT system of the 4.4L engine.
If the thick cold oil does not cause an issue, then I cannot see how the thinner hotter oil can cause any issues
 

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I am not sure why you would be worried about using a better oil in your motor. Cheap oils usually have the closer numbers between the hot and cold ratings. a 5W is going to act the same at cold temperatures no matter what the hot rating is. It just means that the higher hot rating will protect the motor better at the higher temps.

The 5W/40 rating can usually only be obtained in a full synthetic oil, which is a lot more expensive. So that is why the manufacturer specifies a 5W/30 as that is the most common you will get in a cheaper mineral oil.

It is strange to me that you would pick the cheaper oil with less protection.
Just had oil change 4.4 tdv8
Ask for best oil .
Was given castol 5w40
On way home . Got PDF fault
Plug in tool
To regeneration
15min drive all fault cleared
Also shown me it had cleaned bye 25%
On short drive
May do 2nd regeneration?
Not blaming oil .
Most of my driving is short trips .
And happy to reading this .
I want be worring:) br
 

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Just had oil change 4.4 tdv8
Ask for best oil .
Was given castol 5w40
On way home . Got PDF fault
Plug in tool
To regeneration
15min drive all fault cleared
Also shown me it had cleaned bye 25%
On short drive
May do 2nd regeneration?
Not blaming oil .
Most of my driving is short trips .
And happy to reading this .
I want be worring:) br
No, you should use the factory recommended 5w30 Oil.
 
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