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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all! :)
My name is Tim and I live in central Oklahoma.
Looking for advice from the Land Rover community.
About to buy my first Land Rover, a 1999 Discovery 2. It is in "fair" condition cosmetically, but everything works and it drives like new. It has 121,000 miles on it. I can get it for $2,500 (you can barely get a rusty 1980s pickup truck for that around here ;) ).
I used to have a '95 Jeep Wrangler and I miss having a true off road vehicle as I occasionally need one (I'm a photographer and I go ghost- town hunting on the weekends, so I'm often out in the bush).
I like the comfort and cargo utility of the LR, but I admit I'm a little concerned about potential high repairs and maintenance costs over the Jeeps.
Any and all advice and shared experience from other Land Rover owners, especially daily drivers, would be much appreciated!
Thank you! :)
 

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From one new guy to another welcome! (Just bought mine 3 weeks ago)

The maintenance costs can be high if you are going to a dealer. If you are mechanically inclined you can save money there or make sure you have a trusted mechanic. You will hear lots about front driveshaft failure, leaking issues, coolant leaks, and electrical issues. Most of these are due to previous or current owner neglect.

read through disco mike's maintenance thread at the top of the disco 2 forum. Check out you local places for cost of repair. A lot of shops tend to not want to service these trucks.. you don't need those particular shops anyway.

The way I figure it... A land rover is like that super needy puppy you just picked up.. it will probably do things to let you down.. but in the end it is a rewarding experience (not that I have much, but I enjoy repairing and maintaining own vehicles)

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Hello all! :)
My name is Tim and I live in central Oklahoma.
Looking for advice from the Land Rover community.
About to buy my first Land Rover, a 1999 Discovery 2. It is in "fair" condition cosmetically, but everything works and it drives like new. It has 121,000 miles on it. I can get it for $2,500 (you can barely get a rusty 1980s pickup truck for that around here ;) ).
I used to have a '95 Jeep Wrangler and I miss having a true off road vehicle as I occasionally need one (I'm a photographer and I go ghost- town hunting on the weekends, so I'm often out in the bush).
I like the comfort and cargo utility of the LR, but I admit I'm a little concerned about potential high repairs and maintenance costs over the Jeeps.
Any and all advice and shared experience from other Land Rover owners, especially daily drivers, would be much appreciated!
Thank you! :)
My experience is that if someone neglects the "outside", the insides been neglected as well. These trucks are designed to be serviced BEFORE something breaks, not after. You could possibly be looking at a lot of time and money just to get it mechanically sound. I personally would look at spending a little more money up front and get something in better shape. At the very least, take it to a reputable LR INDY shop and have them look it over from top to bottom. It will be money well spent.
 

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If you have any problems you can ask the forums, you don't need to mechanically inclined, as long as you can follow instructions you'll be fine, the RAVE pretty much will tell you what to do step by step.
 

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If you have any problems you can ask the forums, you don't need to mechanically inclined, as long as you can follow instructions you'll be fine, the RAVE pretty much will tell you what to do step by step.
Don't need to be mechanically inclined? Really?:lol: How about I perform a vasectomy on you from a doctors written instructions?
 

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I'd say a surgeon and a mechanic are two different things, and the rave has pictures too, and in Antarctica they do major emergency surgeries by instructions. But it doesn't mean I'd let you perform on me, your a dick. lol
 

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Anybody that works on vehicles needs a basic knowledge of mechanics. My daughter can read and follow instructions, but can't change a tire, wouldn't know what a torque wrench is or how to look at carbon buildup on a spark plug and tell if the vehicle is running rich or lean. IT DOES take a good basic mechanical skills to work on any vehicle, especially a Land Rover!
 

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I had a 1999 D2 and it was reliable, I drove it well beyond 200K miles. Certain things need to be checked. Coolant leaks are #1.
Oil, Diffs and transfer case oil changes can be done anywhere.
Dave
 

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Anybody that works on vehicles needs a basic knowledge of mechanics. My daughter can read and follow instructions, but can't change a tire, wouldn't know what a torque wrench is or how to look at carbon buildup on a spark plug and tell if the vehicle is running rich or lean. IT DOES take a good basic mechanical skills to work on any vehicle, especially a Land Rover!
I'm sure your daughter could change a tire if told how, but wouldn't want too. I'm also sure than if anyone looks at a spark plug and sees build up on it common sense would kick and would ask a question on the forums (which is why I mentioned the forums, to ask questions and to learn), and if your running rich or lean, the D2 o2 sensors will tell you. Yes, basic mechanics are important, but they are also common sense for the most part. The Discovery 2 is pretty straight forward, nothing is really overly complicated, an old v8, and straight forward repairs. I have never worked on a car before owning my Land Rover, I have done almost everything but engine and trans rebuild/swaps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you again for the info and advice everyone!
I should say: I drove a '63 VW all over the country for several years once. There were no smart phones back then, so I learned to carry a tool box and a few spare parts to effect quickie emergency repairs when I was out in the middle of nowhere. No choice, I had to learn as I went or sleep in the car and eat grass and berries. ;) Did the same with my Wrangler. However, these were ridiculously simple vehicles.
The LR is a different animal... Nonetheless, I'm going to try to learn to perform as much work as I have the time and brain power for. Otherwise, I'll leave the work to the experts.
I see these D2s for sale frequently, in clean running condition, with 200,000 to 300,000 miles on them, so I have some confidence in them from that.
I'll update on purchase soon. I'll be meeting with the sellers and the Land Rover garage late tomorrow. :)
 

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Helivacpilot has kind of a harsh way of saying things sometimes, but I agree with him one this one.

Because so much information is available to us these days, one invaluable thing that is always overlooked, and even forgotten, is mentoring. Taking someone under your wing, or being taken under someone's wing, to learn a trade. Having Autocad on your computer and using it to draw lines doesn't make you a draftsman, in the same way that having a garage and wrenches doesn't make you a mechanic.

This forum and others like it are priceless to me, because I am certainly not a mechanic by any definition. But having a good mechanic as a friend is an absolute necessity to me. Not to perform the job in my place, but to come and see and offer advice. With a friend like that, I am able to make sense of the information I can get on the forums, and separate the gospel from the bullshit. When you spend a couple of years on a forum like this, you realize that even the revered gurus are wrong from time to time. That's human and that's normal.

I replaced the engine in my 1979 Ford Fiesta when I was in high school, and the tranny in my 83 Civic and so many other things since, but I was able to do so successfully and without hurting myself only because I had people to tell me how to do it.

In my opinion pictures and written words are not enough, it wasn't for me anyway. So I'd say if you choose to buy a Disco, get as much info and friends as you can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I understand what you're saying, but I plan on leaving most repairs to the shop, and I've located a good specialty LR shop here that also has a LR salvage yard attached to it. I'm sure I can figure out what I can tackle and what I should leave to them. ;)
I have a Porsche Boxster that I won't even change the spark plugs on, but I have a great local Porsche shop for it. The mechanic-owner is a wizard, does excellent quality work, and he's a fraction of the cost of the dealer. People thought I was crazy to buy that car, warning what a nightmare they are, but that hasn't been the case. It has been extremely reliable, and no more expensive to maintain-repair than any modern Toyota or Ford (well, for the most part). It's just a matter of having the right people and realistic expectations.
I'm hoping owning a Land Rover is a similar deal. ;)

Link to the shop: http://www.rovercannibal.com/rover/default.asp
It's a cool place, and I also discovered a local Land Rover club, so I think I'll have the support I need. http://www.okoffroad.com/okrovers/main.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Update:
I did pick it up, and it checked out fine for the most part. It does have a small valve cover oil leak, a couple of the door hinges are stiff and need lubrication, and the ABS module isn't working.
Otherwise, all other power accessories work, no rust, tight underpinnings, has all books and papers, including maintenance records.
Originally purchased at Tulsa Land Rover by the owner of a horse ranch, spent some time in Los Angeles, and came back to rural Oklahoma where it was purchased by the people I bought it from. Recently had a full service including a motor flush, and a new heater core and thermostat installed.
Started right up this morning in 19-degree weather and drives beautifully. It's really tight, smooth and quiet. Tracks straight and true.
What more could I get for $2,500? Seriously, even older Geo Trackers for sale around here are priced at more than 3 grand.
Took these pics on the trails around the lake this morning:





I will be doing some cosmetic work on it as I go.
 
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