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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally have my wife talked into looking at, and possibly buying a new suv. She still drives her very cherry 1990 Toyota four runner with 47,000 miles on it that we bought new in '90.
A few questions to help me buy a Range Rover for her.
1. How come Consumer Reports gives Range Rover such low marks in the mechanical dependability area?
What kind of problems have other forum members had, particularly with new vehicles?
Mechanical, electrical, electronics, or recalls?
We live about 200 miles from the nearest dealer and really don't want to drive there for repairs.
2. If we were to have a traumatic breakdown, will LR/RR transport to vehicle to the dealer, send a mechanic to roadside repair, or whose responsibility to do what to facilitate repairs?
3. I doubt if we would ever sell or trade it (like her Yoda), but how well do Range Rovers hold their resale values?

Thanks in advance for any or all input. I really want to buy her a new Range Rover so I can borrow it on occasion.
 

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I haven't owned one for very long, but I can help a little. Someone more knowledgeable will jump in with details or set me straight, I'm sure. 1. CR is right- these things have been fairly plagued with problems, mostly mechanical but some electrical/electronic as well. LRs are kinda legendary for needing something constantly, often something minor and easy to do yourself (thanks to this forum), but sometimes very complicated and expensive. They aren't Toyotas by any stretch, but they are getting better. 2. If you're buying a brand-new RR and you live a long way from the dealer...well, I wouldn't. Warranty repairs require the dealer to do the work in most cases. Used, you'll be fine. Some insurance companies throw in roadside assistance. Get some and consider an extended warranty if offered. 3. Range Rovers historically have not held their value at all, due to their reliability and dependability issues. Jeeps hang on to value much better. Don't buy it as an investment. I know nothing about the new RRs, so YMMV. Forget about trading it in in 5 years. You'll be disappointed. Plan to hang on to it forever.

ALL THAT BEING SAID: there's just something about owning a LR. It's far, far classier than any Jeep and will often amaze you and others (Jeepers) at its ability to get you there comfortably. It attracts attention and is very civilized for such a beast. And it's quite comforting to know you'll get where you're going, no matter what's in your way. It laughs at snow, scoffs at rough roads and positively grins at mud. Most of all, they're big fun. They're not for everyone, but for some, they're just right. There's good chance you'll never want to get rid of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the input so far. Just like everything in the world, you get the service you could offer by attitude back by the service coming from gratitude. keep coming with comments please!
 

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If you are looking for dependability, better buy something else. If you are looking for fun, you are in the right arena. If you buy a LR or RR, it will be a love/hate relationship for as long as you own it.
 

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if you plan to get a RR by a RR sport from 2006- on (4.4 V8)
or the RR full size 2007- on (4.4 V8)
These are the reliable ones.
Dave
 

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I will agree with safaridave
Although I love my d2... Newer ones are much more reliable.
Also as a recall, reading safaridaves' previous posts, normally aspirated engines are pretty much trouble free (as trouble free as anything else out there)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Anybody see any real difference between the historic 4.4 v-8 and the 5.0 supercharged v-8? (other than the 10 grand on the window sticker). My wife and I are both gearheads and wonder if the 3.0 will keep us excited!
 

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You're looking at a very pricey vehicle that has the majority of parts available not stocked on this continent and virtually no shops want or are willing to work on them. 200 miles to the dealer should seal the deal on buying something else. The new one's are much better than the earlier models, but they're not Toyotas.

Four year residual is average at 50%. Much better than a decade ago. But you're not going to see that in a town without a dealer.

You should be asking the dealer these questions- we have no idea how they're willing to service you.
 

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I'm a Diesel mechanic and I work on a lot of cars and trucks, in my professional opinion, the best cars are the ones easiest to work on and the cheapest. You buy any car and guess what, it's going to have problems one way or another.

This is what I like about Rovers:

-I hate transmission problems more than engine problems. And these Rovers do great transmission wise. Rarely problematic.

- At least on my 03 Disco, the V8 engine it has, is as simple as it gets. 30min and I can have the head off. Components like alternators, starters, power steering, a/c compressor are easily accessible if need be replaced.

- New parts aren't readily available all the time but they can be cheap online and there's a lot of used parts in my area. I can get an engine or tranny in a day.

-Fix the common problems and you got yourself a great Car.

I liked how @discomania04 put it, it's classy, it's not a ******* Jeep. I live in Colorado and every 3rd car is a Jeep, You go to a high school parking lot and half the guys there drive Cherokees, I mean it's cool but really nothing special in my eyes. Land Rovers really stand out and can do just as much as any Jeep. No offense to any Jeep people on here. Those are my thoughts.


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