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I know the shackle will be used well....How does the radio work w/ other cb's?
 

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fine; the same as a regular CB....can even connect to an external antennae......I didnt have a CB radio when I went with RoverX and the gang last Sat. They suggested a handheld CB because its got the same range as a regular, except you can take it out of your vehicle for stuff like scouting, spoting, etc.

Comes with a cig. lighter plug so it runs on batt. while unpluged and powered in the car.
 

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The receiver is a great deal. With a range of only 4 miles, I'd think twice about the CB, unless you are only planning on using it for talking to the people you are wheeling with.
 

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Go for it Keptin....when you wheel radios really help!!
 

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keptin said:
yep..ive been using the hitch rings up till now.....im sure thats an off-roading "no-no"
Yeah, i've used them before on other peoples trucks who didn't have anything.. I've seen some really scary recovery points/techniques in the past.. some open hooks on jeeps.. a few weeks ago a guy had absolutely nothing, so he put a tree strap around his sway bars.. seen straps just wrapped around bumpers.. people yanking with chains.. they'll learn to change their ways once the strap or chain cuts their car, or even worst, their head in half.

The safest and best way to do a recovery... d-shackles which are attached to a frame mounted point (such as a rear shackle), and a heavy-duty recovery strap (not a tow rope).
 

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I would hold off on the radio and save up for a better one. Not all radios are created equal, and a handheld CB won't have squat for transmit power. It says it'll go four miles, but put it in a metal vehicle (which radio can't penetrate, especially if you have tinted windows) in the wilderness, and you'll be lucky to talk to the guy at the head of the line, much less someone outside the group if needed. Cobra makes some excellent radios, but a handheld CB is about as useful as signalling flags.
 

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Well, 4 watts from the transceiver is the legal limit. This radio is 4 watts total ERP (effective radiated power). Which means it probably outputs at 2 watts on high power or 1/2 watt on low. And it says 4 mile range, which is measured in perfect line-of-sight conditions with no outside interferance. Put it in mountainous forest, in a metal box stuffed with interferance sources, and your range with suffer greatly.

If you give it a high quality external antenna, it'd probably be better, but you'd still get far better performance for your money from a mobile-mount CB. For $20 less (MSRP) you can get the Cobra 18WXSTII, which I have in my other car, and it works exceptionally well for the money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
perhaps I will consider that instead. I am planning on getting a firestik setup for the antenna....I will mount the antenna on the wheel carrier as shown on the instructions at discoweb.
 

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Not at the moment, I'll be taking a fresh batch of pics of my truck this week. Gotta clean up some rust, and straighten up cables from where I sold the HAM radio I had in the truck (gotta pay the bills...). But, for my CB antenna, I got a coil-base antenna and used an angle mount to put it above the left fender. It's a good spot that I wouldn't be using for anything else, and it's a good distance away from the transmitting antennas I was using with the HAM radio. The CB itself is mounted on the overhead plastic thingy above the passenger seat, in place of the passenger sunvisor (which didn't work anyway).
 

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Nope, not even close. FRS and GMRS work at about 460MHz, CB is 28-30MHz. A dual-band HAM radio (2-meter/440) can be modified to work with FRS/GMRS, but HAM radio is a licensed service, and requires an exam and fees to use ($15 for a ten-year license).
 
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