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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I washed the engine like many times before, truck ran fine for the first time I drove it, and then, bamn, no spark on two cylinders when I tried starting it the next day.

Had codes pulled and got the following:
P0134
P0305
P0306
P0300
P1300

Changed plugs and wires, used both the spark plug tester (very, very minor glow) and had O'Reily Auto recheck the codes, and I've got the same codes appearing.

The strange thing about this, the misfires are on opposite sides of the engine, cylinders 5 and 6, they're right next to each on the coil packs but are on separate coils, and the two cylinders run in tandem with the firing order (1,8,4,3,6,5,7,2).

I enjoy working on the truck, it's run perfectly until now, but I'm at wits ends with what the problem could be.

Is it possible for 2 coil packs to go out at the same time?? I've 107K on the odometer, never changed the coils previously but had them on this coming fall to-do list.

Any response would be appreciated.
 

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I can see something suspect here and worth a check, cylinders 5 and 6 are managed by the ECU through connector C0636 pins 2(to cyl 5) and pin 15(to cyl 6) see the attachment, i pointed the cavities with red, they are near each other so inspect there and if nothing visible give some contact spray...if no joy i'm affraid it can be a wiring issue or even worst the problem can be within the ECU too but you need tester or oscilloscope to check that albeit it's unlikely but not impossible that both coil packs failed at the same time
 

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Consider that you may have a minor mixup connecting the wires at the coils. (Wires reversed or improperly seated in the coils)
Many have been messed up due to the limited access and the diagram in most manuals is reverse / mirror of what is correct.
Did you pull the upper intake or try to sneak in around it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I can see something suspect here and worth a check, cylinders 5 and 6 are managed by the ECU through connector C0636 pins 2(to cyl 5) and pin 15(to cyl 6) see the attachment, i pointed the cavities with red, they are near each other so inspect there and if nothing visible give some contact spray...if no joy i'm affraid it can be a wiring issue or even worst the problem can be within the ECU too but you need tester or oscilloscope to check that albeit it's unlikely but not impossible that both coil packs failed at the same time
Thanks Fery, that's exactly what was running through my mind last night, whether there was a specific connection on the ECU controlling cyl 5 and 6 firing, considering the firing order, and you, sir, just provided me with that information. Thank you! :)

I do have a question, though, and it's this: By chance, do know where is the opposite end of C0636 goes to?? I'm thinking, well, it might not have an issue on one end, however, it doesn't mean there isn't an issue going in the opposite direction. Maybe??

Regardless, I will definitely add that connection to my checklist for either later today or tomorrow, I need a slight break since I can't count the # of hours I've spent on it with switching wires and all.

Another thing I'm going to check, maybe it could be the culprit or not since I've never pulled it before, is the pcv valve (oil separator), knowing it's right above cyl 5, and, who knows, maybe it got clogged up and causing the wrong kind of pressure?? I didn't take the oil filler cap off and see if it's blowing or sucking air, so I'm just going to pull the pcv valve and check it out since it can probably use a cleaning anyways.

Moreover, regarding the pcv value, I did come across about a dozen or so posts on other sites, not rover specific except 1 or 2, but they were all v8s with a cylinder 5 and 6 misfiring codes being triggered, and it ended up not being coils, wires, plugs, or anything else, but a clogged pcv valve.

So, who knows, with checking the ecu or pcv valve, I'm crossing my fingers here. Worst case scenario, if after checking these things out, since I plan on keeping the truck a bit longer, I'll probably just order new coils and start my maintenance a bit sooner than expected, hoping that, if the other checklist items don't pan out, a few new parts just may fix the problem.

Still, my first instinct is an issue with a connection, it just makes sense with the motor cleaning and all. I'll soon find out.

Regardless, I'll keep the thread updated, hopefully when I get it resolved and if anyone else encounters a similar issue, it will help them as well.

Btw, if any other thoughts come to mind, feel free to speak your mind. I'm a person always willing to listen and learn. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Consider that you may have a minor mixup connecting the wires at the coils. (Wires reversed or improperly seated in the coils)
Many have been messed up due to the limited access and the diagram in most manuals is reverse / mirror of what is correct.
Did you pull the upper intake or try to sneak in around it?
Believe or not, besides 1 plug (coil end) giving me a hard time on removal, I was able to replace the wires without removing the intake. Not easy, that's for sure, but I pulled it off like I did in the past.

Here's the order of the wires on the coils I used:

(left to right, facing back of engine)
top: 1-6-5-8
bottom: 7-4-3-2

And because cylinders 6 and 5 are on the top, next to each other, different coils, obviously, I tested a few times by switching them with one another, even though I knew each ones crossed over to the opposite bank side, to no avail. I even pulled them off, re-checked by making sure they snapped in securely, and still made no difference.

I can see if I f'ed up on one connection, it happens, though this scenario seems extremely odd to me.

I think Fery may be onto something here. I'll post an update once I complete my checklist.
 

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Rover Kid said:
By chance, do know where is the opposite end of C0636 goes to??
yes, it's hardwired to the injectors, no other connection involved so you'll se the same colour wire both sides and can even check continuity if you want, see the red arrows...prepare yourself with RAVE ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yes, it's hardwired to the injectors, no other connection involved so you'll se the same colour wire both sides and can even check continuity if you want, see the red arrows...prepare yourself with RAVE ;)
Besides the injectors, does the C0636 contribute to spark at all? If I'm reading the schematic correctly, it looks like C0368 is in charge of spark, not C0636, and C0636 is for fuel only.

And even if C0368 ran spark, it looks like there are 2 leads from the ECM leading to each coil, and if I'm thinking correctly here, wouldn't it also mean I'd have issues on more than 1 cylinder per coil, if I had a wiring issue from the ECM to the coil packs??

Or could there be a fuel problem where the computer is saying no spark for you (cylinder) unless you have fuel?? I would think I'd throw an error code for fuel, besides misfiring, if there was a fuel issue.

Anyways, here's what I've done this latest round which is still kinda pushing me to coils as the culprit...at least right now.

1) Checked C0636 connection and nothing looks out of the ordinary (no corrosion, burnt type marks, wires look intake from what I can see and follow under the dash, etc)

2) Checked pcv valve, the oil separator was a little dry-rotted, not very dirty at all except there was a small piece broken off one fin and lodged into the opening on the next fin which almost clogged it completely up. That's not a good thing! ;( Engine seems to run a bit smoother, had a little more oomph on the peddle compared to yesterday, however flashing CEL light came on within 30 seconds or so and when put into gear it obviously didn't solve the problem.

3) I swapped cylinder plug wires 5 and 6 on the coils with 8 and 1, respectively, to see if I could get spark, and, yup, spark plug tester was glowing very bright and consistent, so I am able to get power to plugs on those misfiring cylinders (5 and 6), at least by using an adjacent coil hole.

So, again, unless C0638 can cause a single fault per coil, there's another connection, besides C0368, running spark to those two cylinders only, 5 and 6, and causing havoc here, or if the ECM is not generating spark because no fuel, I at least know I can get spark to those 2 cylinders and, possibly, getting one step closer to confirming the coils may be DOA.

Thoughts?
 

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Unfortunately i'm not the best when it comes to V8 addaptive strategy, i helped friends with V8's few times with electrical troubleshooting but that's it, though depends if all the fault codes are coming back or just P0305 +0306, if P1300 is still present it's possible that your theory with spark inhibition for lack of fuel to be valid cos P1300's detailed description in the fault code list is: Engine mechanical fault, wiring, ignition/fuel system, injector, ECT/MAF sensor, ECM though i'm just clutching at straws on this cos if it's not pure electrical i'm useless, sorry.

the diagram in this case is not very accurate cos if we corroborate with the description that's what i found:
It is possible to test both primary and secondary coils of the ignition coils for resistance using a multimeter as follows:
l Expected primary coil resistance: 0.5 ± 0.05 Ω at 20 °C (68 °F).
l Expected secondary coil resistance: 13.3 ± 1.3 kΩ at 20 °C (68 °F).
The ECM provides the earth control for each coil on separate pins as follows:
LH Bank (cylinders 1, 3, 5, 7)
l Cylinder 1 - pin 6 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 3 - pin 2 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 5 - pin 8 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 7 - pin 7 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
RH Bank (cylinders 2, 4, 6, 8)
l Cylinder 2 - pin 2 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 4 - pin 7 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 6 - pin 6 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 8 - pin 8 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.


so check C0368 too cos pins 6 - 8 are somehow adjacent but as both cylinders are sharing the input with others it's not very likely to be that eventually if that signal is some PWM different for each cylinder on that pin the problem lies in the ECU(provided it's not some mistake in RAVE cos i found that not once:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Unfortunately i'm not the best when it comes to V8 addaptive strategy, i helped friends with V8's few times with electrical troubleshooting but that's it, though depends if all the fault codes are coming back or just P0305 +0306, if P1300 is still present it's possible that your theory with spark inhibition for lack of fuel to be valid cos P1300's detailed description in the fault code list is: Engine mechanical fault, wiring, ignition/fuel system, injector, ECT/MAF sensor, ECM though i'm just clutching at straws on this cos if it's not pure electrical i'm useless, sorry.

the diagram in this case is not very accurate cos if we corroborate with the description that's what i found:
It is possible to test both primary and secondary coils of the ignition coils for resistance using a multimeter as follows:
l Expected primary coil resistance: 0.5 ± 0.05 Ω at 20 °C (68 °F).
l Expected secondary coil resistance: 13.3 ± 1.3 kΩ at 20 °C (68 °F).
The ECM provides the earth control for each coil on separate pins as follows:
LH Bank (cylinders 1, 3, 5, 7)
l Cylinder 1 - pin 6 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 3 - pin 2 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 5 - pin 8 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 7 - pin 7 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
RH Bank (cylinders 2, 4, 6, 8)
l Cylinder 2 - pin 2 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 4 - pin 7 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 6 - pin 6 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.
l Cylinder 8 - pin 8 of connector C0638 of the ECM multiplug.


so check C0368 too cos pins 6 - 8 are somehow adjacent but as both cylinders are sharing the input with others it's not very likely to be that eventually if that signal is some PWM different for each cylinder on that pin the problem lies in the ECU(provided it's not some mistake in RAVE cos i found that not once:
Now I'm not positive on whether I was getting P1300 or P0300 along with the 2 other misfire codes on this last reading. Because this last time I went to O'Reilly, prior to leaving and coming right back to get the codes read again (3rd time), the guy agreed to clear the codes since the 1st person told me 'It was store store policy not to clear codes...'

So, I drove away, flashing CEL came back on, and went back for the 3rd reading.

Thinking out loud here, I'm almost positive the 3rd code was P0300 because, as far as I know that should have been triggered because of multiple misfires, I was more focused on the 2 misfires returning.

Now, if I am correct with P0300 being the 3rd code, whether P1300 eventually popped up since the 3rd reading was read within 5 minutes of the engine running, I'm not sure.

But then the real problem is, if I'm wrong here, it also means I may be leaving your part of the equation out, the ECU being the culprit, which may be true.

Well, for now, since I still have the panel off the passenger side, later today I'm going to review the other connection and see what I find.

I'm also going to see if I can locate a different OBD App, knowing the Torque App didn't work in pulling codes, and see if I can finally get the ELM327 to do what I purchased it to do, and that's to pull codes from the computer. Torque, supposedly one of the better OBD Apps out there, works great for live stats, however, I have yet been able to pull codes using it.

Here's a question: Would you agree, at least knowing I had the 2 misfires, if I only had 3 codes last reading, P0300 would show up, no matter what? I would think so.
 

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At this point all i can do is to wish you good luck cos i have no more ideas :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
At this point all i can do is to wish you good luck cos i have no more ideas :(
Although I have a few more ideas, I just need to find a few answers before i can implement them.

The latest I've done...
1) Checked C0638 and found nothing on the ECU portion
2) Added a full can of Seafoam to the intake, let it sit for about 1 hour, and drove to the parts store for another code reading. No difference at all. Same codes as previously.
3) Added a can of HEET when I got home, will run it again tomorrow night, to see if moisture got in somewhere
4) Attempted to trace the wiring from the ECU to 5 and 6 injectors, no luck, too difficult with the intake on

So before I go further I just need to find out the following which will help me figure out where to go from here.
1) Does the ECU require fuel in order to fire? If not, then it leans towards coils being bad. If it does need fuel, well, then it could be a fuel problem
2) Where does the ground for Injector 5 6 lead to? I tried looking up the electrical manual, couldn't find anything, because, if it is a fuel issue, I could have a short somewhere since I doubt 2 injectors would go bad at the same time.

I'm also going to, most likely, order 2 coil packs, valve and plenum gaskets, and just pull the top so I can get a better look at what's going on.

No matter what, this is starting to drive me nuts!
 

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2) Where does the ground for Injector 5 6 lead to? I tried looking up the electrical manual, couldn't find anything, because, if it is a fuel issue, I could have a short somewhere since I doubt 2 injectors would go bad at the same time.
if you watch the diagram part at post 6 those brown wires are all injector feeds coming from fuse F1 through a splice joint which is somewhere in the harness, it's not shown where, the injectors are managed on the earth path by the ECU so you can measure with a multimeter if you have 12V on the brown wires to injectors 5 -6
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
if you watch the diagram part at post 6 those brown wires are all injector feeds coming from fuse F1 through a splice joint which is somewhere in the harness, it's not shown where, the injectors are managed on the earth path by the ECU so you can measure with a multimeter if you have 12V on the brown wires to injectors 5 -6
Well then, if that is true and this is fuel related and/or tied to wiring, I can possibly assume one of the following:
a) A ground short from the earth path end that splits to 5 and 6 injectors under the intake because, otherwise, if there was a ground short elsewhere, knowing all injectors share the same lead to fuse 1, well, I would think it would cause havoc on more than those 2 injectors alone.
b) A short on the leads from the ECU to those 2 injectors, possibly somewhere near the top of the engine, an area I cannot see at all.
c) 2 bad injectors. Doubtful...though still plausible.
c) ECU is fried. I really don't think so. I could be wrong as well. ;(

But what's strange to me, not sure if this is my problem or not, I came across a posting on another LR site where the owner also had misfires on cylinders 5 and 6, though his included cylinder 1, and his problem ended up being a dead 02 sensor on bank 1 sensor 1 position that was causing it. Someone who was helping him out had commented that the ECU was getting confused, possibly using previously read data and/or last known data and because the sensor wasn't working consistently, the ECU said, 'Piss off cylinders 5, 6 and 1, no spark for you since you have no fuel (my interpretation here).' ;)

So, regarding that post, if the person was correct in stating no fuel = no spark, this kinda confirms my previous theory. Someone else, not sure if it was the same person, also commented that the owner should get the sensor changed asap because it can cause lots of problems.

And, strangely enough, on my first reading from O'Reilly Auto, my bank 1 sensor 1 was dead and wasn't being read by the ECU. Coincidence? Not sure.

Now I just need to decide, do I want a sore back (top engine work) or tons of debris falling in my face (under car work)? That is the question of the day, lol.
 

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You lack the proper tools to do a proper diagnostic. You can buy the tools, pay someone with the tools to diagnose for you, or throw unneded parts at it until you find the issue. A good scantool will allow you to look at what that O2 sensor is actually doing. you can watch its output in real time. It's called live data.

If you throw parts at it, replace O2 sensors in pairs and only use OEM or Bosch direct fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You lack the proper tools to do a proper diagnostic. You can buy the tools, pay someone with the tools to diagnose for you, or throw unneded parts at it until you find the issue. A good scantool will allow you to look at what that O2 sensor is actually doing. you can watch its output in real time. It's called live data.

If you throw parts at it, replace O2 sensors in pairs and only use OEM or Bosch direct fit.
Well, sir, I can't disagree with you.

Any suggestion on what brand/model scantool to consider?

And regarding the sensors, I agree, I knew I can only replace in pairs and would only use OEM for parts like that, I've read too many horror stories on where people have regretted using cheap knock offs.

In the meantime, I just got off the phone with the land rover service department where I originally bought the truck, told her I don't want to throw money at it since I live in the boonies and would have to tow it to them for I have a lack of import mechanics in the area, she understood, and because I bought a few trucks from them over the years, she gave me her email and I sent a summary of what I've done so far, codes that were read, even explaining I know I need sensors, coil packs are past due, etc, and she's going to discuss with a few techs and try to get a consensus on where to go from here.
 

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I have no experience yet with this tool but it has been recommended by people who know on this site- https://nanocom-diagnostics.com/shop/product/ncom04. A fully functional professional tool is very expensive. This may do alot of what that tool will do- the issue being it will only do one vehicle whereas the pro tool will do everything. Nanocom has an online demo you can check out.

I would not take it to a Rover dealer. The chances of the tech looking at it having much D2 experience is probably slim. D2's don't show up at dealers much anymore. A good independent is a better bet.

Looking at it logically- it worked, you washed it, now it doesn't. The odds of it not being related to water intrusion are pretty slim. It hasn't been discussed in this thread, but if you power washed the hell out of it, including outside, and you have a windshield leak, there may be water intrusion down where the ECU is mounted in the right side kick panel. I would look there, then I would strip the entire harness back off the engine and find where the fault might be. The split loom they used on these trucks doesn't last. It's not uncommon for it to turn into crusty crumbles after a decade. That leads to chafing at contact points.

Don't assume you need coil packs or sensors. You may very well not. All a code tells you is there's an issue with information coming from somewhere. You can replace a TPS because you have that code, but if the wire to the sensor is chafed, all you've accomplished is eliminating the possibility of it being a bad TPS- you still have the problem. You need to look at the output from the TPS as it goes through its operating range and see if it has an issue.

If it worked before you got it wet, you're going to have to find out why. Either that or move to a desert.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have no experience yet with this tool but it has been recommended by people who know on this site- https://nanocom-diagnostics.com/shop/product/ncom04. A fully functional professional tool is very expensive. This may do alot of what that tool will do- the issue being it will only do one vehicle whereas the pro tool will do everything. Nanocom has an online demo you can check out.

I would not take it to a Rover dealer. The chances of the tech looking at it having much D2 experience is probably slim. D2's don't show up at dealers much anymore. A good independent is a better bet.

Looking at it logically- it worked, you washed it, now it doesn't. The odds of it not being related to water intrusion are pretty slim. It hasn't been discussed in this thread, but if you power washed the hell out of it, including outside, and you have a windshield leak, there may be water intrusion down where the ECU is mounted in the right side kick panel. I would look there, then I would strip the entire harness back off the engine and find where the fault might be. The split loom they used on these trucks doesn't last. It's not uncommon for it to turn into crusty crumbles after a decade. That leads to chafing at contact points.

Don't assume you need coil packs or sensors. You may very well not. All a code tells you is there's an issue with information coming from somewhere. You can replace a TPS because you have that code, but if the wire to the sensor is chafed, all you've accomplished is eliminating the possibility of it being a bad TPS- you still have the problem. You need to look at the output from the TPS as it goes through its operating range and see if it has an issue.

If it worked before you got it wet, you're going to have to find out why. Either that or move to a desert.
Although that tool is a bit pricey, from the little reading I've done, it does seem like a good tool to have on hand. So thanks for providing the link.

Regarding repair shops, I agree, despite being so far from the L R dealer, if I have to take the truck somewhere for repairs, even though I've done most repairs myself since I enjoy doing it, I would prefer an independent repair shop. The problem is, I've rarely had any issues (knock on wood) with any car I've had over the years, both newer and older, since I try my best to maintain them myself, and I really can't think of any 'good' independent repair shops, lol. I will soon, however, if I can't figure this out.

And, no, I didn't power wash the hell out of the engine. I've probably done over 100 engine washes in my lifetime, for many cars, and always covered important areas and if using a power washer a wide nozzle under low pressure, and rarely encounter a problem. And if I had an issue, it always ended up being on an older car, possible wet distributor, which always had me shaking my head because I would think it would be in the reverse, where the newer car would give me trouble. Obviously, that theory is now under review! ;(

Still, no doubt, your assumption on my problem being water related is probably correct.

Fragile wiring on this truck, for its age, is purely an understatement here. I'm almost afraid to touch some of the wires in the engine area! Seriously. For example, one of the splits coming out from ECU area on the passenger side, specifically, the one with ground wires leading to the body, which when I get under the truck again I'm going trace for this exact reason, the wire protector was just crumbling in my hands and now I have wires exposed. I was like, What the....! It was so fragile.

Honestly, compared to other vehicles, even though I really don't consider this truck 'old', to me, it seems like modern day plastics are only getting cheaper and cheaper over the years, at least compared to a few decades prior to this build, where older cars I've worked on still had their plastics and rubber in much better condition. Go figure.

At this point, I'm not ruling anything out. But I kinda agree with you that it could be as simple as a single wire that's causing it. Or, like I was discussing with Fery, which I hope is not the case, the problem leads to the ECU.

Well, since I haven't been able to send my email to the L R dealer because they're having website issues, I'm not going to start replacing anything yet. I'd like to hear what the dealer suggests first and take it from there. So besides the regular maintenance I plan on doing, like new radiator, water pump, valve gaskets, sensors, etc, parts I have or will have shortly because they all are the original and need replacement, I'm just going to hold off, do it all in one shot, and be done with it.

However, as for my parting thoughts here, not sure why, my gut instinct is telling me, knowing I no longer smell rotten eggs when the truck is turned on, now have an instant flashing CEL as opposed to solid light (yes, I know, it's not good), and still seeing how filthy the O2 sensor connection was, still is, since I only slightly fanned it with cleaner and/or water because I didn't want to cause any problems (well, that theory is now also debunked! ;( ), not to mention it was that same O2 sensor putting out a SOS signal with throwing a code, that it could be that O2 sensor, possibly a wire, so, initially, I'm going to focus on that area and see what I come up with.

Btw, I apologize for the delayed response but appreciate you taking the time to share your thoughts. Thanks.
 

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....

Fragile wiring on this truck, for its age, is purely an understatement here. I'm almost afraid to touch some of the wires in the engine area! Seriously. For example, one of the splits coming out from ECU area on the passenger side, specifically, the one with ground wires leading to the body, which when I get under the truck again I'm going trace for this exact reason, the wire protector was just crumbling in my hands and now I have wires exposed. I was like, What the....! It was so fragile.

Honestly, compared to other vehicles, even though I really don't consider this truck 'old', to me, it seems like modern day plastics are only getting cheaper and cheaper over the years, at least compared to a few decades prior to this build, where older cars I've worked on still had their plastics and rubber in much better condition. Go figure.

....
Hi, first of all i discourage you to rely on what a main dealer will tell... IMO they simply dont care about such old cars cos they want to sell new ones...or like here in EU they dont have a clue cos skilled mechanics or engineers are too busy to get involved in ''remote'' customer support or after they gained enough experience they leave th dealer and start theyr own business

about the quoted part, it's a very good point about the wiring, happened to me too, mine(Td5) was running OK(so i thought) without any fault present but when i changed the glow plugs i felt the loom quite ''cooked", didnt like that so i bit the bullet to buy a new engine main harness and replaced the whole thing.... what a surprise... the engine ran much better after that, smoother and with more power, then i inspected well the old harness and found pins loosen in all connectors and many wires ''tenderised'' by heat

unfortunately for V8's the harness is more expensive than for diesels(which are also not cheap) so if you dont have a thick wallet it might not be an option for you unless you love your car as much as i do but replaceing the engine harness on a such old car is one of the best moves provided you are determined to keep it forever as i do... good luck with your troubleshooting, i hope you'll get to the end of it soon
 

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An issue I have seen on a few D2's is that at some point in their lives someone did a repair underneath and left the heat shielding off. This is tough on the wiring, especially the part of the loom that descends along the bellhousing split and down to items such as the O2 sensors.

It's not that elaborate or complex of a harness. If you start working your way from the knock sensors and oil pressure sensor up and back, it comes off fairly easily. You'll have to pull the plenum, but that's an easy task. The toughest part is getting to the section at the bellhousing. It is retained by the bellhousing bolts and it's a tight squeeze. I would replace the starter solenoid while I was there- you've already done most of the work by that point. At some point in the project you'll likely spot your issue. And you will have extended the lifespan of your truck in the process..
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hi, first of all i discourage you to rely on what a main dealer will tell... IMO they simply dont care about such old cars cos they want to sell new ones...or like here in EU they dont have a clue cos skilled mechanics or engineers are too busy to get involved in ''remote'' customer support or after they gained enough experience they leave th dealer and start theyr own business

about the quoted part, it's a very good point about the wiring, happened to me too, mine(Td5) was running OK(so i thought) without any fault present but when i changed the glow plugs i felt the loom quite ''cooked", didnt like that so i bit the bullet to buy a new engine main harness and replaced the whole thing.... what a surprise... the engine ran much better after that, smoother and with more power, then i inspected well the old harness and found pins loosen in all connectors and many wires ''tenderised'' by heat

unfortunately for V8's the harness is more expensive than for diesels(which are also not cheap) so if you dont have a thick wallet it might not be an option for you unless you love your car as much as i do but replaceing the engine harness on a such old car is one of the best moves provided you are determined to keep it forever as i do... good luck with your troubleshooting, i hope you'll get to the end of it soon
Fery, you are correct about bringing any car to the dealer, I know I can easily save 25% or more by going to, like CT090 suggested, an independent repair shop. It's also why the woman I talked to at the L R dealer is going to get ideas from tech(s) without having paying a single dime to the dealer. :) When I first called I had joked around with her, teller that if I don't answers to my questions, I'd set up a website and list reasons why people shouldn't shop at (this dealer), and I had her laughing at the idea. I guess it worked. I was finally able to send the summary to her this morning because, after calling again a few hours ago, I discovered the reason previous emails didn't go through, which she obviously wasn't aware what they were doing since it just occurred, is that the dealer changed the email extension, so she now has it in her inbox when she gets back to work on Tuesday.

Regarding the wiring harness, kinda funny you bring this up, although I didn't look for pricing but considering the fragile nature of the some of the wires, I actually had that thought last week. So, once I hear back from the dealer to see what ideas they may have, I'm going to do some homework and see what I come up with harness pricing.

Thanks, again, for the input, it's apprecaited.

I'll keep the thread updated...
 
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