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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reading any technical data will tell you that the ideal ignition timing should change with compression ratios, octane of fuel, displacement of motor, etc. So I have found it frustrating that Land Rover seems to specify the same timing no matter what engine size, what compression ratio, or what fuel you are using. So the standard ignition timing cannot be correct for all the different motors.

I watch too many car TV shows. One is a show called Horsepower. They put their motors on the engine dyno and the main thing they ever play with is the ignition timing. They can noticeably increase the power by just changing the timing by a couple of degrees. So I have wondered for a while as to whether a timing change would make a difference to my Rangie. My current frustration is that I do not believe it is pulling as well as it can from 50mph in top gear. On my test hill, it was dropping back from 50mph, to just over 44mph (it is a steep short hill).
So I went and bought an adjustable timing light. I found it too difficult to try and mark all the degree points on the engine pulley to use a fixed timing light.
On Horsepower they keep on advancing the timing to get more power up to around 34 degrees total mechanical advance. So I advanced mine 2 degrees and noticed no difference on the hill. Advanced it another 2 degrees and felt it being slightly worse. So I dropped it back to 2 degrees more retarded than what I originally had it set at and I cut the drop on the hill to less than half what it was. I thought I am on the right track and dropped it by another 2 degrees and the performance got a bit worse. So it seems that 2 degrees less than what I had it was a sweet spot and instead of a 5 to 6mph drop in speed, it was down to between 1 and 2 mph. I think is is a good improvement from such a small change in timing.
I keep on chasing those small improvements.
 

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Playing around the timing could cause some problems like fuel consumption and power loss. If your engine is still in stock form, it would be best to keep the original timing spec and make sure to use a timing gun in checking the range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Playing around the timing could cause some problems like fuel consumption and power loss. If your engine is still in stock form, it would be best to keep the original timing spec and make sure to use a timing gun in checking the range.
Stock is just a general setting. It is adequate, but by no means ideal.
 
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