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Hello all. I’m wondering if anyone has cracked the code on getting music to play from an iPhone through an 06 sound system?
Seems the technology is there. You have Bluetooth. You have phone calls connecting through the sound system. So why can’t it play my pandora!?
Has anyone figured out a hack for this?
I want to keep my 06 but this is a real disappointment.
 

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2003 Discovery 2 SE7
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Hello all. I’m wondering if anyone has cracked the code on getting music to play from an iPhone through an 06 sound system?
Seems the technology is there. You have Bluetooth. You have phone calls connecting through the sound system. So why can’t it play my pandora!?
Has anyone figured out a hack for this?
I want to keep my 06 but this is a real disappointment.
A lot of old Bluetooth systems only do phone calls, which runs on a different protocol than music (which is why "BT Audio" was often touted as a feature on cars some years ago, separate from "regular" hands-free Bluetooth). I looked into this a while back to see if I could get music through the phone-only BT system on my Volvo, and it doesn't seem like there is a way to modify the Bluetooth you already have to do music as well.
Even if you could find a way to run music through phone-only Bluetooth, it would be horrible audio quality because the tech is old and isn't designed for high-quality audio streaming - its original purpose was to allow you to make fuzzy phone calls and that's it. That's why I am leery of apps such as this one that trick your car into thinking your music is a phone call. I haven't tried it, so I can't speak to how well it works (if it even does), so it might be worth a shot, but I have a feeling that it won't work very well. Depending on how the phone call integration is in your Range Rover, you might not be able to access anything else in the system (such as navigation) while on a call, as was the case in a mid-2000's Toyota I used to own. It might also come through only the front speakers, which is the case in my Volvo and why I haven't tried that app.
If you have a cassette deck like my Discovery, you can buy a cassette-to-AUX adapter, which is cheap and works great. If you don't have a cassette deck like my Volvo, your only choice (other than an expensive complete rework with a new head unit, assuming they even make one for your specific car) would be to buy an FM transmitter. They work alright - sound quality isn't bad - just don't expect super high-quality audio. You can get some high-end ones that apparently work pretty well. They are inexpensive, so that's the route I went. Just make sure to buy a decent quality one - I have found that the super cheap ones are not worth the hassle.
 

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There’s a less than elegant solution involving a small BT receiver in the rear console with a short 3.5mm audio cable to the aux port. The weak point is that you will only control the music from your phone. Doesn’t bother me so much because I wear an Apple Watch and can skip tracks easily from it. 2005-2009 is the bastard year. There is an aftermarket BT solution for up to 2004 and then again for 2010+ but not in between.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
A lot of old Bluetooth systems only do phone calls, which runs on a different protocol than music (which is why "BT Audio" was often touted as a feature on cars some years ago, separate from "regular" hands-free Bluetooth). I looked into this a while back to see if I could get music through the phone-only BT system on my Volvo, and it doesn't seem like there is a way to modify the Bluetooth you already have to do music as well.
Even if you could find a way to run music through phone-only Bluetooth, it would be horrible audio quality because the tech is old and isn't designed for high-quality audio streaming - its original purpose was to allow you to make fuzzy phone calls and that's it. That's why I am leery of apps such as this one that trick your car into thinking your music is a phone call. I haven't tried it, so I can't speak to how well it works (if it even does), so it might be worth a shot, but I have a feeling that it won't work very well. Depending on how the phone call integration is in your Range Rover, you might not be able to access anything else in the system (such as navigation) while on a call, as was the case in a mid-2000's Toyota I used to own. It might also come through only the front speakers, which is the case in my Volvo and why I haven't tried that app.
If you have a cassette deck like my Discovery, you can buy a cassette-to-AUX adapter, which is cheap and works great. If you don't have a cassette deck like my Volvo, your only choice (other than an expensive complete rework with a new head unit, assuming they even make one for your specific car) would be to buy an FM transmitter. They work alright - sound quality isn't bad - just don't expect super high-quality audio. You can get some high-end ones that apparently work pretty well. They are inexpensive, so that's the route I went. Just make sure to buy a decent quality one - I have found that the super cheap ones are not worth the hassle.
Hey. Thanks for all the information. Sounds like its time to upgrade my RR for a new one. Do you happen to know at what model year this technology became available on the RR?
 

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I believe Bluetooth Audio became available starting in 2012 on the L405 (most recent generation) Range Rover that debuted that year.
 
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