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My co-worker is test driving a 96 4.6 hse over the weekend and the air ride will not work at all. He isn't dying tokeep it either. Is there some type of coil spring conversion he can do if he decides to buy it? What are some problem areas he needs to look at before buying? I noticed under the front/bottom of the engine there was a mass amount of oil caked up around what looked to be the oil pan where the oil filter is. Checked the oil and it was fine, maybe the problem is fixed? Thanks for any help!

David
 

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Yes you can convert to coil suspension rather easily. You really should go to www.rangerovers.net as they have a great section on common problem areas with these vehicles. Take a look there, it is a great resource.



Serg
 

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Well if you have tons of money to pour into air suspension repairs, then by all means keep it. The Rover I bought had a brand new air suspension put in less than 3 years ago and that completely failed last year. The PO replaced it with coils.

Serg
 

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DSkeet said:
My co-worker is test driving a 96 4.6 hse over the weekend and the air ride will not work at all. He isn't dying tokeep it either. Is there some type of coil spring conversion he can do if he decides to buy it? What are some problem areas he needs to look at before buying? I noticed under the front/bottom of the engine there was a mass amount of oil caked up around what looked to be the oil pan where the oil filter is. Checked the oil and it was fine, maybe the problem is fixed? Thanks for any help!

David
If this were a classic Range Rover I would agree and say don't bother with the air. But it's not. The 4.0/4.6 Air suspension is better than the older style. And lasts longer. You should get around 70,000 miles out of an air spring. They are rubber and designed to be replaced, just like your belts and hoses. The ride will be crappy with coils compared to the air on road. Obviously off road is different, in the sense that off road you don't ever worry that your bags are going to bust. However, I've been off road in Moab with several RR 4.6 owners who only modified tires and spring mountings and kept the air and did just fine - in extended mode. Also, check out eBay, there are tons of 98-2000 models out there going for about wholesale cost. They have better stereos, air suspension control, engine management, etc. even though they are all still the 4.0/4.6 body style.


Dave
'98 Range Rover 4.0
'94 Discovery
'69 Series IIa 88"
 

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I read your post about the Rangie your co-worker is looking at. Coil Springs are very expensive to install and take away from the resale value in my opinion. It kind of gives the impression the car has something wrong with it. If the EAS is not functioning in this particular vehicle, you may be able to pick it up at a substantial discount. You can figure about $2500 to completely replace the EAS components at a Land Rover dealership which will give a 12 month / 12,000 mi warranty on all the parts and labor.

From my personal experience with a tempormental EAS system on a 1996 Rangie, I developed a simple solution to a faulty EAS system. The system allows the air springs to be manually inflated using a tire pump. The system will hold air as long the air springs and air lines are good. It restores drivability to the car and gives the owner an opportunity to save the funds for repair or go another route. I sell these kits online at www.carrollrovers.com. Check it out, it may be exactly what your co-worker needs.

Regards,

Justin Tiemeyer
www.carrollrovers.com
1996 Range Rover 4.0
 
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