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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, as you may have seen from my earlier post, I'm on the hunt for a D90. I happen to have found one not far from my house just yesterday and was hoping to find out a little more about the drivetrain on these beasts. So... what year did they start putting the R380 transmissions in? 1995? That's what year this one is that I'm considering. Also, the thing has 120,000 miles on it (ouch!). Is there any rhyme or reason as to how long the V8 lasts? Also, how much is a clutch kit for these things? I'm thinking it would'nt be much different than the one I just put in my '63 IIa; maybe a little more. Any comments onyone? :wave:
 

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I'm not sure when the R380 came out. All the NAS110s came through with LT-77s, and they were all made in '92, for Model Year '93. Pretty much all of them have had their LT-77 changed out to R380s.
That box is not as robust as the 4 speed in your S2A, but it's about as good as that in a series 3. What really makes them better is changing out the fluid (ATF in an R380)to synthetic, with a quart of Lucas. They shift smooth as silk them. Longevity is strictly related to operator care on the boxes, not age or milage. Same is pretty much true with engines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply! Another question, is the V8 rebuildable? Obviously any engine is, but is this V8 capable of being rebuilt without costing thousands? I suppose I'm just trying to see what I'd be up against in the future if I were to purchase such a high milage vehicle.
 

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I'm interested to hear about how robust the R380 is compared to others. I have a 1984 V8 110, which for some strange reason was factory fitted with a four speed box with the reverse next to fourth. I am told this box is called an LT-95(85?). My problem here is that the box is very noisy, (bearings) clunks badly in take up (output shaft?) and is going to cost me about SAR10000 (US$1100) to remove, strip, rebuild and replace. The box is robust, that's for sure, but I could really, really do with 5 speed in the V8 for long road trips.
What are the options for a robust, 5 speed box for my V8? If the R380 is smooth and quiet but not robust, I don't want it. Longevity and reliabilty are crucial out here in Africa! Was the LT 77 5 speed? What should I expect to pay for a recon. one?
Any advice gladly heeded! PHIL
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm not sure (since I was the one asking questions about transmissions to begin with) but I believe the LT 77 was a five speed. From what I was told, the difference I guess between the R380 and the LT 77 was the gear pattern (where reverse was located). All the stuff inside the box... couldn't tell you. I better leave that one to the pros. Hey, does anyone know what the largest tire size is that will fit on a D90? :drive:
 

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The LT77 has reverse where the R380 has first gear. This is probably why they replaced it. The LT77 actually replaced the LT95 in 1984 and it was/is, a noisy box. The LT77 was replaced in 1991 with the LT77S which remained in service until 1994 when the R380 came out. The R380 is a stronger gearbox than the LT77/LT77S, but the R380 with L instead of J at the end of the serial number is a stronger box.
 

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Drewfuss said:
Thanks for the reply! Another question, is the V8 rebuildable? Obviously any engine is, but is this V8 capable of being rebuilt without costing thousands? I suppose I'm just trying to see what I'd be up against in the future if I were to purchase such a high milage vehicle.
Yes, the engine is very rebuildable. I just did a 4.2 from scratch, so costs are pretty well known. Figure on about $800 with machine shop work. Boiling out the block, plane the heads and install the cam bearings are jobs best left to them. Cam bearings are extremely soft, and require tools for each size (there are 4 different sizes)
Parts to buy: Cam, Lifters, Timing chain and both sprockets, Rings, Main & Rod Bearings, Top end set (includes gaskets, stem seals, injector "O" rings, new headbolts). Front & Rear seals.

Other parts that MAY require replacing:
Oil pump gears, Valve Guides, Starter ring gear, water pump (cheap insurance)
Have a good, clean work environment, an engine stand, CLEAN tools, and about 16 hours.
Shop around for your parts, you would go broke buying them from the LR dealer. Genuine LR cams for a 3.9 were known for soft heat treatment, and shorter than averagae life . I don't reccomend going to performance parts unless you want to spend more $$. Crane makes several different grinds patterns, but they all require changing valve springs and milling the spring pockets in the heads. Oh yeah, did I mention removing all the valves, cleaning and lapping them, keeping the valves and springs in order.
There is one brand of piston rings which I strongly reccomend, but I can't remember their name at the moment. They are 4 piece in staed of 3, like factory and have better scrapers. When replacing the rings, clean the ring grooves thoroughly, they will be carboned up.
All of the above is pretty much the basic minimums. Other considerations will be when you check the crank for wear, and the cylinder bores. If the crank requires grinding (in increments of .010") oversized bearings are used. If the bores are severely scored, they may need boring, also in increments of .010" and oversized pistons (& rings) will be needed. This is where you really need to weigh the choices of a new shortblock or proceeding with a rebuild. The supply of new 4.0 shortblocks is eventually going to dry up, but at those quoted prices of $1400-2000, they're pretty inviting.
Oh yeah, forgot to mention, replace all freeze plugs and oil gallery plugs, that's pretty much a given since the machine shop will have removed them when they boiled and blew out the block.
 

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Excellent. Thanks for this, Disco. I can now go R380J hunting!
Another thought I had was trying to use a Toyota box in my landy. I'm sure if I use the 'Cruiser box they fitted to the 4.2D, it would be able to take the torque. My reasoning is that I do a lot of on road driving, where I don't need 4x4, followed by bursts of 4x4. I have a guy who can fit me freewheeling hubs on the 110, but this isn't really worthwhile unless I can find a box with switchable 4x4. Have you ever heard of anyone doing this? Is it a minefield of problems? Phil
 

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Terry,

Can you recommend a shop to do an engien rebuild in the New England area? I have a 4.6 and a 3.9 waiting to be rebuilt.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Just found out a bit more on the intro of the R380. 1994 was the last year the LT77 was put into the NAS D90s. Apparently, halfway through 1994 the R380 began to be implemented (so I suppose there are a few 1994 D90s out there with the R380 from the factory). All the 1995 NAS D90s had the R380.

Happy Dingus Day!! :beer:
 

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As far as I know, LRNA recalled all the '93 (built in '92) 110s and replaced their LT77s with R380s NC, I assume they did that with D90s also. There are doubtless a few out there that didn't elect to have the swap. LT77s are noisy, but apart from that they're not unreliable. If you ask me, R380s are pretty noisy too (at least in the less than well insulated 110).
 

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How much is he wanting for that d90? I am just wanting to know, as someone in my area has one for $17,000. It has about 140,000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
$22,000..... It has about 115,000mi. on it, but it's in really nice shape.
 
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