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I know there is a lot of opinion out there that RRC axles, particularly the 10-spline versions, are weak.

Two observations tell me maybe this isn't the case:

1. The full-float front and rear design, as well as the thickness of the axle tubes, is impressive. Additionally, the axle shafts themselves, despite the low spline count, are relatively thick.

2. I have been running 33" mudders on my '92 for years now and never have broken an axle. That's years of hard 4-wheeling. Granted, east-coast wheeling with less rocks than the southwest, but still hard 4-wheeling.

Even my Ford Super Duty doesn't have a full-float front end! How big is the ring gear in the differentials?
 

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I found that as long as you wheel with careful use of the skinny pedal with the 10 splines you generally won't have a problem.

I also ran 33's up in NH with no issues for a few years on a RRC
 

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Around 93 they changed over in the RRC the disco's all came with 24 spline
 

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Tests have shown that the standard 10 spline and standard 24 spline axles are nearly identical in strength
I am curious about the tests you reference. Were they just comparing 10 vs 24 spline rover shafts or were they standardized tests that then could be compared with other manufacturers shafts? know where I can find a write up or results?
 

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I am curious about the tests you reference. Were they just comparing 10 vs 24 spline rover shafts or were they standardized tests that then could be compared with other manufacturers shafts? know where I can find a write up or results?
It was done by Ashcrofts. Here are the results.
 

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A lot depends on the driver of course but terrain is the other big factor.

High traction areas such a rocks are always hard on axles. Throw in a few ledges, a V8, some tight turns and steep climbs that get the truck in a power hop situation and they will give up the fight pretty quickly.

Stress in the shaft itself is also acumulative. The more the shaft is twisted beyond it's limit the weaker it becomes. It may hold out for an entire week of hard trails only to snap on a easy hill. It happens, and that is probably where Land Rovers got the bad reputation for "weak" axles.

Toyota have avoided this problem by using engines with shitty torque and transfer case's with higher gearing........they now have a reputation for "strong" axles.
 

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So that chart says the 24 spline has no elasticity and the breaking point is the lowest? How is that better?

I like your toyota comparison. Toyota's piss me off
 

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So that chart says the 24 spline has no elasticity and the breaking point is the lowest? How is that better?

I like your toyota comparison. Toyota's piss me off
I don't understand this either, I was interpreting the same way; the 24 spline has lower breaking point. That can't be right. I welcome others' opinions on the 10 vs 24 spline as I want to put a rear locker in my 89 but all of my Rover friends are telling me to put 24 spline axles in first.
 

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Spline count is not that important when it comes to Rover axles. IMO there is very little to choose between the two strength wise. They are both perfectly adequate for the stock vehicle driven with a modicum of common sense. It is more likely the stock two pin diff will fail before the shafts. Both 10 and 24 spline axles use the two pin diff design.

The main benefit of the 24 spline axle is that most Range Rover's and all Disco I's imported to NA will have 24 spline axles making spares and upgrades easier to obtain. But if I had a 10 spline axle (and I do have a 87 RRC) I wouldn't swap it for a 24 just for that reason.

If you are thinking of going to the trouble of an axle swap for purely strength purposes and you are thinking about getting serious with tyre size and power etc. it is best to ditch the Rover axle entirely and go for a inherently stronger unit. If you have the cash you can build up a Rover axle with aftermarket parts to handle 35" tyres on rough trails but it will never be as strong as a Dana 60 or built, custom fabricated axle.
 

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That is helpful, thank you. I didn't realize there would likely be diff issues before a failing axle. A buddy of mine has 24's and has offered to put them in for me before doing a locker so if they are free and it's a project I could do with a friend over a few beers it would be a good learning experience for me. Other than that, doesn't sound as important as I thought it did.
I will be using this as a trail rig w/ 2" suspension lift, some 32/33" tires with some trimming, and hopefully a rear locker.
 

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I recently snapped a 10 spline axle in my 90 RRC while trying to climd a 38* granite face. The pass. rear wheel spun and when it grabbed the axle snapped. Though Roverandom's comment about sensible driving practices may come into play here. I'm not sure what he means by 2 pin diff. Mine has only one pin and suffered no damage when the axle snapped.

Sent from my T-Mobile myTouch Q
 

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I recently snapped a 10 spline axle in my 90 RRC while trying to climd a 38* granite face. The pass. rear wheel spun and when it grabbed the axle snapped. Though Roverandom's comment about sensible driving practices may come into play here. I'm not sure what he means by 2 pin diff. Mine has only one pin and suffered no damage when the axle snapped.

Sent from my T-Mobile myTouch Q
2 pin refers to how many contact points with the casing. Yes it has only one pin, but it makes contact at either end and is therefore referred to as a 2 pin diff. A broken axle is easier to fix off-road that a broken diff. Diifs usually break when you upgrade the axles so they don't break or through excessive wheel spin that causes the spider gears to weld themselves to the cross shaft (pin)
 

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I recently snapped a 10 spline axle in my 90 RRC while trying to climd a 38* granite face. The pass. rear wheel spun and when it grabbed the axle snapped. Though Roverandom's comment about sensible driving practices may come into play here. I'm not sure what he means by 2 pin diff. Mine has only one pin and suffered no damage when the axle snapped.

Sent from my T-Mobile myTouch Q
A V8 in a 4,500lb SUV. High traction granite rock. Steep 38* angle. Wheel spin followed by sudden 100% hook up...........yeah, that would break most stock 1/4 ton axles.

;)
 
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