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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am just starting to rebuild a 1965 109 Station Wagon.

I have started to strip it down to a 'rolling chassis' and will have lots more questions but for now I would like to know:

1 - How heavy is the roof and does anyone have any suggestions on the easiest way to lift it off. I am working by myself in a rather small garage.

2 - How can I check for rusting inside the frame channels?

Any help on these matters would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

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65landy,
Ah, the pleasures of a take-down...make sure you take lots of pictures and label everything you remove...you won't remember in 6 months what it is...

Now, I took the roof of my SWB myself, so it couldn't weigh more than 60 pounds or so...I'd say you would need one other person for a 109 roof. Just undo the bolts, lift enough to clear the sides and windshield and push...

Maybe a small mirror would do the trick for checking for rust inside the frame...but, honestly, if you're going through the trouble of redoing a 40 year old vehicle, get a new frame...this assures you won't have to take everything apart in a few years...

Bogatyr
 

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As Bogey says, it's not very heavy, but cumbersome. Two people can easily handle it. Unbolt the side window panels at the top of the box, top of the B pillars, and along the top of the windscreen. Two of you then get indside, lift, and walk it back. The reason I suggest leaving the roof and side window panels joined, is it is easier to store that way. You can always unbolt the window panels from the roof when you're at that stage, or replacing the top seals.

I also agree, the amount of work in an rebuild makes the investment of a new frame inconsequential if you consider what it will add to the vehicles value, not to mention logenvity. There are simply too many areas for a 109 frame to rot, so if you thought you checked them all, surer than ****, a bad spot would show up 6 months after complettion. Don't waste your time welding on replacement outriggers to an old frame.
A good thing to have when undertaking a serious rebuild, is a parts truck, or another one close by to refer to. This is an unsolicited plug for 109 Bogey is selling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info

Thanks for the information.

It looks like I will be adding a new frame to the growing list of parts. Since I have already decided to change the springs and rebuild the axles - a new frame would probably make the job go smoother.

As for taking lots of pictures - I found that out the hard way. :eek:

Even though I have the Land-Rover Workshop Manual I will be taking LOTS of pictures.

This is the second time I have done a rebuild on the 'old girl'.

I got her in 1973. Our 'shake down' trip was from Vancouver BC to Dawson City in Yukon. Somewhere between Whitehorse and Dawson City I burnt two exhaust valves. Zero pressure on one cylinder - 25 pounds in another. The other two were good and I brought it home on two cylinders. The first rebuild was limited the motor and tranny.

She has been in 'rough storage' for the last 15 years. But, she is in rather good shape considering what she has been through.

Thanks again for the info.
 
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