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Hi All -

I have a 1964 Series 2A SWB. I've had the car for about 6 years, and just starting to have my first major issue - transmission item. Ever since I purchased the car, it would slip out of 3rd gear while only going uphill. It wasnt a big deal, and it was easy to just hold the stick in place while I went up hills. The car shifts smooth, but recently the car started making making a grinding noise whendriving in in 3rd gear. Esssh.

I am not THAT car savvy, but at the same time no altogether green, and will have the car looked at to confirm. Assuming it is a transmission issue, I have a few questions:

1. Would you take it to a LR specialist to do the repair, or any old timer that knows old cars is fine? (I feel that the specialty shops charge you for the privilege of working on your car).

2. If it is a catastrophic failure, and I need to do a rebuild, any experience with the rebuilt transmissions from the UK? I have heard mixed reviews as they are not always perfect on arrival and still need some tweaking.

3. If I go the rebuilt route, someone suggested I upgrade to a Series 3 transmission with full synchro. I am used to the double clutch thing, so that is not an issue. What other advantages of a Series 3 transmission are there - and is it worth the extra money. I was quoted approx $3k for a Series 2 transmission + core exchange, and about $4500 for a Series 3 with the required upgrade parts.

4. As long as the transmission is open, is there anything else that should be done while it is apart? (Clutch, oil/fluids, etc...)

5. Side question - I have the original style brake system on the car. Is a power booster a suggested upgrade? And will I notice a significant difference in stopping distance, or just less effort required to push on the brakes? I briefly looked at the disk route but that seemed rather pricey for my purposes.

Thanks... i am really not looking forward to this repair bill, but the car is so much fun to drive for weekend play, I dont want to just let it sit.

Blasky.
 

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You have to remember that it is a very old transmission.

I would say that you will need at least new bearings.

If shafts, etc are worn, it will be hard and expensive to get replacement parts.

Any manual transmission workshop should be able to do the work for you.

It is often best to rebuild your current transmission as you will know what parts are replaced. You should also get a warranty. Whereas you can't just drop back the transmission under warranty if it is purchased overseas.

The drum brakes on those things were never really good. If they get wet they are virtually non-existent. But you can never go fast enough to really worry about having to stop.
 

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I spoke to my Landrover Mechanic today about series gearboxes. He has had a vehicle in his workshop for over 12 months now attempting to get decent parts to rebuild just the gearbox. There are parts available for them, but they are usually **** quality. He showed me a few of them and they were absolute rubbish and would not last long. These parts were obtained through reputable parts suppliers. You just have to just keep on searching the internet for new old stock that someone might have stashed away somewhere.

He has had reconditioned boxes from the UK and they have only lasted a few thousand miles.

So be very careful with what you buy and good luck.
 

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Brakes - as mentioned already, the brakes are poor by modern car standards, but a IIa was never designed to be driven like a car. Brake shoes function very badly when wet as water is trapped between the lining and the drum face with no natural method of dispersal. No amount of additional braking power will overcome this problem. But in dry weather, fitting a brake servo from a SIII will improve the situation. If you change to disks, however, you must use a servo from a Defender, Discovery or RangeRover as the SIII servo will not have sufficient power.

Gearbox - slipping out of 3rd is a common IIa problem, but the grinding noise is something different. Is does sound like you need a rebuild. Without seeing the inside, I would be looking at 3rd gear synchro and maybe even 3rd gear bearings as it sits on the mainshaft. On the plus side, the IIa box is very simple and a straightforward DIY rebuild if you can get the parts. The gearbox is just about as simple and basic as a gearbox can be and no special tools are needed. Fitting a SIII box would give you the advantage of synchomesh, but the SIII box is nowhere near as strong as a IIa box.

If you find difficulty in sourcing good gearbox parts, then I would suggest contacting a specialist in the UK. Sadly, the UK's leading transmission specialist (Ashcroft) does not touch Series boxes, but parts of good quality are readily available from a huge number of specialist garages. They may be prepared to ship them out to you provided it's not too much hassle.
 
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