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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,

This may have been asked a 1,001 times. I did search, but nothing I could find helped me.

I've had a nail puncture my rear tire, I've fixed it for now. However, I went to a local tire shop (which is reputable,) and they really wasn't keen on the idea of changing a single tire, they have kinda worried me... They insisted I changed all 4. The car (Discovery 2 2001) is relatively new to me, so I have no history on the tires fitted, all I know is that they look in pretty good shape. I've decided I'm going to bite the bullet and change both the rear tires (obviously the same size as the fronts.)

Do any of you guys have any experience of this causing any major issues? or will I be safe?

Dave.
 

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Hi dave
It is allways recommended to change tires as a set on all wheel drive vehicles.
Difference in rolling diameter (even same size but new vs. 1/2 worn) puts added stress on the drivetrain, mainly the transfer case. It can also (sometimes but somewhat rarely) cause a.b.s. Malfunctions due to a difference in rotating speed.

Back to the repair.
A proper tire puncture repair (patch plug combination) should last the life of the tire.
What is your concern with the puncture?
 

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I replace two on our BMW's all the time. The rears wear like crazy and are a different size than the front.

As Red said, it can maybe make a difference if it's dramatic. If one tire is about worn out, the circumference is going to be a bit bigger than it's mate. That means that in the rear your differential will be working non-stop. In the front you can get some steering drift. Front to rear doesn't much matter.
 

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I replace two on our BMW's all the time. The rears wear like crazy and are a different size than the front.

As Red said, it can maybe make a difference if it's dramatic. If one tire is about worn out, the circumference is going to be a bit bigger than it's mate. That means that in the rear your differential will be working non-stop. In the front you can get some steering drift. Front to rear doesn't much matter.
Ct . Are you referring to an all wheel drive BMW?
BMW commonly stagger their tires and I am guessing the rear tire wear is likely due to an "overactive fun pedal;)"

I have seen issues with transfer case whine and even damage from unequal tire size on a number of vehicles. Suburu were famous? Infamous for drivetrain issues and damage that was contributed to unequal tires /tire wear.

Size difference side to side will overwork spider gears in the differential.

Size difference front to rear will overwork the transfer case!

So maybe a drift, a.b.s.issue, differential or transfer case problem.... No wonder the tire shop is strongly advising a "set" of tires
 

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Well, my wife claims that I keep buying defective rear tires, and she's never wrong... But it is a problem on these cars. It may be their rear alignment geometry. I just never much cared to investigate. The choices are either buy tires or buy different cars. In my wife's case, she drives "briskly". My son drove my daughter's 5 series for a summer and cooked a set of new Michelins off the back in 4500 miles. I've been driving a little 3 series convertible I took in on a trade in the spring and I definitely notice the rears going away more quickly. Is it the car or the driver? I've learned that when I can buy my way out of an argument, I should just do so.

Back to the subject at hand---If you do the basic math, a 30" tire with 3/16" less tread depth than it's mate travels 56 feet "farther" in the course of a mile. That's about 1%. Will that make a difference? Maybe ask UPS. They never turn left.

If you think about in these terms, a set of spider gears is rarely not working, unless you are on I-80 crossing Iowa. The same for any of the limited slip or locking-type differentials. I don't know that statistic, but I'm guessing every vehicle on the road today has had a greater than 1% variance in left vs. right operation over its lifespan.

Having said that, I learned early on that tires aren't something to mess with. I've had exactly one flat in 34 years and it was on a 4-hour old tire. Unfortunately it was at 80MPH in the left lane passing a tractor trailer at night on I-95 in rural SC. And it was instant deflation. But I always replace tires at about 35% remaining tread. It's cheap insurance.

From a logical perspective, if you have one new tire and three at 40%, when are you expecting to step off of this merry-go-round? Are you going to buy 3 new tires in the fall? If you are choosing between the kids tuition payment or a new set of tires, that's one thing. Otherwise...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
From a logical perspective, if you have one new tire and three at 40%, when are you expecting to step off of this merry-go-round? Are you going to buy 3 new tires in the fall?
I intended to just buy the rear two tires for now, then replace the front two in two months. I can't stop thinking how wasteful it is... One blown out tire is going to set you back $600+ for a whole replacement set, when theres absolutely nothing wrong with the front two. I guess, I'll have to suck it up, and buy a full set :(


Hi dave

Back to the repair.
A proper tire puncture repair (patch plug combination) should last the life of the tire.
What is your concern with the puncture?
Because the tire shop wouldn't repair my tire (something to do with regulations! and punctures towards the outer edge,) I decided to repaired the tire myself, with a "Slime" plug kit... From Walmart! - haha. I also filled it with Slime, just to be double sure the repair will hold:grin But, it's one of those little things which is going to constantly play in the back of my mind... Annoying the **** out of me!

Thanks for your advice guys.
 
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