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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm getting well stuck in on my project now. It's not a restoration; I'll be retaining the previos mods and incorporating a few others too.

The strip-down was completed a few months ago, shortly after the delivery of the new chassis (Marsland galvanised HD 1-ton with 2.5 engine mounts, extended spring hangers and mounts for 3 fuel tanks). I also got my hands on a new galv bulkhead. The twin 12 imp gal underseat and standard 18 imp gal rear tank will give a range of over 1000 miles. Twin 2-Jerrycan lockers extend this with a further 10 imp gal. All the accesories are to be refitted, the doors reskinned, the body painted in 2-pack, windows tinted and the interior redone from scratch.

The rear Salisbury axle was new 2 years ago, unused and crated military spare, the front rebuilt at the same time. The gearboxes and overdrive were rebuilt last summer. I have a mint 12J (installed prio to strip) that I rebuilt 5 years ago, and an unknown 19J (TD) whch needs rebuilding. I haven't decided on which to fit yet. I'm on the steering box at the moment, waiting for parts.

Here are some pics of the work to date. You can see the specs and details of the vehicle prior to strip down on my website.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks.

I got home today and my wfe gave me my birthday present (a bit early, but it's to big to hide it) - and EvansUK bulkhead removal bar, like those fitted to new 90s. That'll make the interior much better. Still got a few more smaller bits waiting for my birthday too! :)
 

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Brill, i saw a bulkhead removal bar in a 90 hardtop and it worked a treat, allowed the seats to actually move back!

Have seen them from £88 at mudstuff (i think).

I'm cheap, so I found one of those bulkhead bars as found in station wagons with the slight bends in it and intend to fit that.

As soon as i fix my gearbox and get it through its MOT :bawling:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Mine's from Evans UK, for about £230. Very high quality. I don't want to screw around as it's structural. The SW bar may work; it'll certainly keep the spacing between the door shuts, but as it's only horizontal, it may allow the body sides to flex, albeit in parallel to each other. The proper bars are diagonal, forming a stable triangle between floor, body side and the bar itself, and is thus rigid.
 

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Yeah, new it was a strucural thing, but, figure if it off one model, might work on another. May fix some extra box section lower down though if i ever even get round to doing it.

when will your build be finished?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
The trouble you have is that the rear bulkhead is in a different position to and is a different shape from a 109/90/110 bulkhead, and to don't have the space infront of the bottom of the bulkhead, behind the seatbox. You may be able to design something specifically for the 88 based on the Def bar, but re-engineeered to fit, and even be able to sell copies commercially. Let me know how you get on.

I managed to get the outstanding parts for my steering box, so at least that's back together now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
No - the steering is fine on Series Land Rovers, so long as everything is in good condition and correctly set up. This is particularly true of the steering box, rod ends and top swivel pins. I prefer to keep the vehicle as mechanically stock as possible. That way it's more robust, there's less to go wrong and it's easier to fix when you do have a problem, especially when away from home. It also avoids loading your insurance premium.

Apart from fitting an Overdrive, parabolics and a Land Rover diesel conversion, the vehicle is mechanically the same spec as when it left Lode Lane. Parabolics are a huge benefit, and I prefer the economy and reliability of diesels over petrols, but I think that Land Rover had most things about right when they designed the SIII. The trim is a little sparse and the heating and seating need improving if you drive any distance, but the vehicle was ideal for its task. I think LR have lost their way recently; it's all well and good having high-tech luxury flagship models, but the utilities should not be fitted with electronics (except alarms and radios), and should be bush-mechanic friendly.
 

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Hear Hear!

I agree. You can fix a Series landy with any tools at any place. No need for plugin computers or any fancy equipment.
I once replaced the diaphrame on my Petrol pump this a piece cut out from a Truck inner tube. Only lasted the 200km's but got me home!
THAT is bush friendly!!!

No electronoc fuel-injection & timings and such for me thanx. Sure the chance of someting goining wrong is littl.(click)..littl.(click)..littl.(bang)..(smoking!!)....
But if it does you are deeply embeddded into that gooey stuff that stinks!
 

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What Diesel enjin are you using?
 

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Well your not wrong about the plentiful amounts of moisture; dirt; heat; vibration but I still would keep my 2.25 petrol as she will keep on turning aslong as she has something vaugly combustible in the tank. I think the point about keeping it series as much as possible (i.e. keeping it simple) is so much the better less to go wrong and better to fix.

Tango
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
As you can tell from my avatar, I'm not terribly cocerned about originality. My 109 was built in 1982 as a standard 2.25p hard-top. Nothing historic or unique about it. It does break my heart, though, to see Series Is being used for trialling, as these are now historic.

I do, however believe in keeping things simple, so when the very worn out 2.25p (5mb) came out, and a diesel went in (for better economy), I wanted to keep it Land Rover. It may have less efficiency than a Ford 2.5d, and less performance than the Nissan 2.8, but the LR 12J 2.5 nad is tough, reliable and simple. I can still get all my parts come from one supplier, rather than going to several manufacturers, and everything fits properly without any dodgy fabrications.

I have just ordered a new rocker set from Turner Engineering, as they were the only moving parts not replaced when I rebuilt the 12J a few years ago and the old pads have had it. Otherwise, the engine is in fine fettle, and pulls the 109 along at 65mph on level ground, dispite all the extra drag created by the roof rack and spots.

I have a 19J engine (2.5td) on the garage floor which, except for the exhaust, will be a direct swap. Approx 33% more power and torque, but not too strong for a SIII transmission (unlike the better Tdi). However, it has done 100,000 miles and uses a fair bit of oil, according to the owner of the broken 110 it came from. It'll need a full rebuild, which I'll entrust to Turner's at a later date and when funds permit. My only concern is the 19J's reputation for reduced robustness than the 12J (particularly in cracking pistons, which I suspect of my unit).
 

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no mods on enjin mounts & bell-housing then?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
If you use the LR 2.5, you need to modify the rhs chassis mount. For the Sherpa (British Leyland van) 2.5 nad (same engine, different timing system), the brackets from the original 2.25 engine are used, with no chassis modification.

As I had a new chassis made to order by Marsland, one of the specs I included was 2.5 engine mounts. These will allow me to fit the 2.25 petrol and diesel (using the 2.5 rhs engine bracket), 2.5 petrol, NAD and TD, and the 200Tdi.

The bell housing requires no modification. The SIII clutch must be used. When the conversion was done for me, they retained the SIII petrol flywheel in order to make the SIII clutch easier to fit. This is not heavy enough for a diesel though, and results in a little extra vibration when idling. It also make timing more difficult as it has no timing marks. I am planning to use the flywheel from the 19J during re-installation, possibly with a 2.5 pressure plate. You also need to move the battery and air cleaner, and fit a throttle cable.
 

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the Prima Perkins diesel engine?. Supposed to be a nice engine for landy conversions, as fitted in Montegos as well I believe. Can supposdly do nearly 60mpg!

Twas a variation of the old 'o' series petrol engine, and bolts straight onto the LT77 gearbox, as fitted in landis and other British Leyland cars, the SD1?

...after reading that I think I need to stop reading about car specs and actually do something useful. :drive:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Prima is only any good if it's the turbo diesel variant. There are conversion kits around.

The thing I don't like about it is that, as a car engine, the timing belt is not waterproofed, so wading will wreck it. As for 60 mpg, I think someone's pulling your chain! 60 KM per gallon in a carefully diven Maestro perhaps, just.

Got a good haul for my birthday today: mirror heaters from Scorpion Racing, seat heaters from Exmoor Trim, a few bits from Land Rover Gear, and some nice LR drawings from my 4 yr old boy, in addition to that bulkhead bar.
 
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