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Both sun roofs on my 94 300Tdi ES will only respond slightly to a push of the button - that is they will tilt very slightly but will not tilt fully or fully open? Has anyone else had the same problem and if so how did they manage to fix it?
 

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bucksflyfisher said:
Both sun roofs on my 94 300Tdi ES will only respond slightly to a push of the button - that is they will tilt very slightly but will not tilt fully or fully open? Has anyone else had the same problem and if so how did they manage to fix it?
Same issue, just only with the rear sunroof, slightly pushing them up works for me hehe.
 

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Re: Fixing the sunroofs

bucksflyfisher said:
Both sun roofs on my 94 300Tdi ES will only respond slightly to a push of the button - that is they will tilt very slightly but will not tilt fully or fully open? Has anyone else had the same problem and if so how did they manage to fix it?
You are looking at some work. Try to do the work in the shade or out of the sun. It is difficult working on the sunroof in the summer day hours.

I just did mine on my 96 D1 and the sunroof was a drop-in kit from Germany. It used to close with a satifying sound of a clunk, then it broke by opening unevenly and then jamming. The clunk was the left regulator anchor point actually coming off and then going back in until it finally popped out on a beautiful perfect evening for driving.

The window regulators that are the sliding mechanisms on the left and the right side, which are bound to fail. They are sliding exposed parts that get dirt, moisture, and whatever that flys in.

Try to remove the facia or trim around the sunroof first by using a point and prying out the plastic covers that cover the screws and then removing the dozen screws. When you do that, you then can view the flexible spring and mechanism that the motor screw engages to slide the windows. If you have it, pry the inspection hatch for the motor and don't be surprised to have the fuse , wiring and excess stuff hit you on the forehead. The motor is held up by an anchor screw and usually hold up the fascia. It will do the George of the Jungle routine and try to fall on you or clock you.

Beware. It can become a two person job quickly. Don't use a nag or disinterested individual. They will just become a candidate for the Emergency Services. Either the motor or the nagging will make you do it. Back to the job.

Lubricate the regulator with silicone spray not WD-40. WD-40 will seize with cold temperatures and will collect grime and make things worse. Silicone will work in all automotive temperature extremes and is the workshop manual recommended way. Prior to the lub, make a Q-tab or cleaning tool to clean the track prior to lubrication. Look and Ditto on the archimedes screw thingy but the spring thing will grab lint. It is a mechanical thing, so remove all lint as it comes up, otherwise its jam time later.

BTW, try not to breathe the silicone spray nor get in too much contact on your living surfaces. It ain't friendly. Read the warnings so you know.

When you are done and ready, replace the motor and work the window.

If it works better, fine. Take a breather and then take your time putting it back together.

If you think you're in over your head, say it and find someone who has the same regulators and can do it for you betterer. I got mine done for $140.
Some doof wanted to fix it by replacing the whole original install and replace it for $900.

Right.

Hope I helped.:wave:

Adam in NYC :drive:
 
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