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I've been running all four at 40 lbs for some time now based on recommendations from Disco Mike years ago. Of course this is not what the manufacturer recommends. I'm currious to have some opinions from the guys on this forum. When I got to thinking, my biggest worry is that I'm going to have a higher risk of major tire failure/blowout on the road and cause an accident using presssures different from the manufacturer recommendation. I did a search and really didn't see much. Your thoughts and experiences on the subject are appreciated.
 

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Collin x2
but FYI I run my tyres at 38 front and 42 rear - the big trick is to try and get no wax bloom (the whitish layer) on the outside of the tyre wall. If you have a lot of bloom the sidewalls are flexing too much for the weight - at the same time if you have nothing then you aren't flexing enough. Obviously all of this goes with normal tread wear, if you are wearing on both sides of the tread surface your pressure is too low (cupping) and if the center is wearing your pressure is too high
The manufacturers of the vehicle will nearly always run at the lowest pressure they can for comfort, the tyre manufacturer will run them as high as possible for safety reasons.
With my last set of michellins I ran then front and back at 36, with my current bridgestone duelers its 38 and 42. My W210 mercedes on conti's runs 34 front and 36 back (right on spec) - the bridgestone turanzas I had on it last did best at 40 front and back.
Just play with them to get it right but if you do worry then run as per spec in the book :)
cheers
Barri
 

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For everyday driving you should run your tires at pressures that give you the correct contact patch on the road.
No one on the internet can tell you what that is unless they have the exact same weight vehicle and exact same tires.

The one exception to the above is contacting the tire mfg, giving them your axle weights and which tire of theirs you have. They'll tell you the optimum tire pressure for that tire given the weight it's carrying.
 
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