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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to the forum and just bought a 2001 LR Disco II SE with 87,000 miles on it last week. In very nice condition and drives well despite two things that are worrying me as of late.

Over the weekend I noticed a few drops of coolant on the driveway (only noticed it once in the last few days of owning the SUV). Couldn't pinpoint the leak, but I am not making a big deal out of just as of yet because after reading reviews and forums Land Rover Discos do have issues with a leak here and there. Disco has never overheated.

My bigger concern is the water sound I am hearing behind the dash...I have read many fixes on the matter, but I haven't seen anyone post about the problem as of recently (meaning 2014) so for anyone new like me I wanted to get a thread going again on water sound behind dashboard.

I am letting the Disco cool down right now and I am going to try a method that I read in one of the other threads....this being that there might be air in the heater core so I was going to release the air with these steps:

Make sure your coolant level is topped up. With the engine cold, fill the reservoir to the top. Start the engine with the reservoir cap off and let the engine warm up. At the same time, turn your heater to the highest heat level and max fan. And lastly idle around 1500-2000 rpm for a few mins.

I know there are other methods that include raising the coolant reservoir and opening the bleed screw...also read about ac drain plugs...

What are your thoughts? recommendations?

Trying all the cheaper options first and hoping that its nothing serious.

Thanks
Marek
 

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You are more than likely hearing the water running through the heater core. You may need to just top it off. Might be a good idea sense you just purchased the rig to go ahead and flush the coolant system. Flushing the system sure won't hurt anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There was service records that the previous owner gave me...looks like there was a flush done in August. You are right a flush won't hurt anything.

I will top it off because I do see that its below the line.

Thoughts on trying to get the air out with the method I described in my first post? I could also bleed it through the bleed screw? Just thinking of the cheapest options first that I can do without taking it anywhere...

Thanks for the reply!
 

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Let it bleed

Now comes the hard part–filling the system. If the system holds 12 quarts, you want to install 6 quarts of undiluted antifreeze, or exactly half of the cooling system's capacity.

The cooling system has lots of nooks and crannies that trap air, making it difficult to fill the system with coolant. The fill cap and neck are supposed to be at the high point of the system to help air bleed out, but often they aren't. And even if they are, you need all the natural help you can get. So jack up the front of the car, which gets the coolant fill neck as high as possible.

Check for air bleeds on the engine. Sometimes you'll see an obvious air bleed, such as a boltlike item threaded into a hose. If there's an air bleed, open it. If there are several, open them all. If you have access to a factory service manual or PM CD-ROM for your car, check it for a coolant fill procedure.

Pour in the required amount of antifreeze slowly until you see coolant oozing out of the open air bleeds. Then close the bleeds and top off the system with the remaining antifreeze and then plain water.

If the system has a heater coolant valve, close it by moving the temperature control lever or knob to cold. With the engine running at fast idle and warmed up, have a helper move the lever or knob to hot while you listen at the coolant valve. If after the first rush of coolant you hear a continuous gurgling noise, there's still air in the coolant, and you should be prepared to watch the coolant level in the reservoir over the next few weeks.
 

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I personally haven't had to bleed the cooling system on any of the Rovers I've owned.
 

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The reason you have air in your cooling system is because you have a head gasket leak that forces coolant out when hot and when it cools, it sucks air into the cooling system.

I have headsets with bolts, upper plenum gasket and heater feed O-ring for $205 shipped.
 
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