Land Rover and Range Rover Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

I have a weber carb on my V8 which prevents me from getting up any
kind of really steep hill (off-road or a simple steep driveway!).
I've read through the previous posts in this particular forum and once
again there seems to be people for and against weber carbs. I've spoken
to people who have said that the weber carb has turned a good landy
into a bad performer into a sold landy! I will be trying to source out the
original carbs for my V8 because I'm sick of cucking myself when the motor
stalls on a very steep incline, I've had enough practice on my emergency
hill stalling thankyou very much!

Any comments
cheers
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,225 Posts
All the comments I recall in the past, and I was one of the ones bitching, was concerning the webbers fitted to the 2.24 litre engine. I hate the one on the 2A we bought, and will be going back to the original when the truck takes shape. While it may have improved performance when new, it will not stay in adjustment now and runs way too rich.
Are you using something like a 36 DCD or 40DCD? The float levels may be set too low if you're stalling out on inclines ( Unless, of coarse, it's an incredibly long incline)
There no naturally aspirated intake setup on a V8, that is sexier or better performing than 4 Weber 40 DCDE, but setup is critical, synchronizing and mixture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Weber carbs

There is definitely a love hate relationship with Weber carbs. I must echo TerryS with regard to the float settings. I have done some pretty steep inclines without ever having a problem. If you adjust the float careful you don't go too far the other way which can also have its problems.

I am using a weber 36DCD on my 4.1 litre 6 cylinder Chev engine in my Series IIa. This is the carb where the second stage comes in when the accelerator reaches about half way down. The jettings are critical on the weber carbs. What often happens is that when consumption is high people lean out the main and secondary jets. This results in performance of a 1 litre engine (or seems like it anyway). I had a problem that when the second stage engaged the engine would actually seem like it lost power. It took trial and error of trying different jet and venturi sizes but now I've got a combination which gives performance and reasonable fuel economy. (I bought my Landy with its set up of engine and carb).

I must say I find that once my weber is set there is nothing more that I have to do. The adjustment of air and idling screws only affects the idle and because the other jets are set sizes they never need adjustment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What would the reason have been for the original owner who did the conversion to take off the original carbs and replace with the weber? :dunno:
If it is that the weber gives you more performance in the way of more
speed on the freeway then not having it will not bug me much as I prefer
to spend as much time driving my landy, so doing 80 instead of 110
is a pleasure! :drive:
 

·
Profesional Hunter
Joined
·
443 Posts
Butternut said:
What would the reason have been for the original owner who did the conversion to take off the original carbs and replace with the weber? :dunno:
If it is that the weber gives you more performance in the way of more
speed on the freeway then not having it will not bug me much as I prefer
to spend as much time driving my landy, so doing 80 instead of 110
is a pleasure! :drive:

1) the V8's had two Solex carbs on. It was a bitch to sincronise the two carbs.
2) At some stage Solex's and spares for them were not available in south Africa, but Webber always was.
3)My personal opinion is that the webber is a easyer carb to work on and get sorted than the old Solex carb.

Iv got a Webber 36 DCD on my 2.25 motor. I can oly say good things about it. I have more power and better economy than with the old carb (Also a solex if I can remember correctly.)

As all of you puionted out. It lies in the Jet settings and the float level. Fool around with diffrent combinations until you get the ideal.
I bought a recon kit (with about 3 sets of jets) for R150 about two years ago (At my local spares shop). I tried out all kinds of combinations and now have it sorted.

Another thing that you can look at, HOW IS YOU FUEL PUMP PREASURE??

The pump needs to pump the fuel a long way from the 109's tank (at the back) to the motor. Espesially the amount of fuel your V8 will require. If your pump only work at about 60% effectivity it would be sufficiant for flat roads but would definatly suffer on an incline!

Before you do any thing with your carb, first recon your fuel pump. (a Rover kit cost about R100)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks MOERAS

At long last a constructive answer to the question I have been trying to
get a response from for the last year!

WHAT A GOOD FIND THIS FORUM IS TURNING OUT TO BE FOR ME! :clap:

OK, now I do I go about checking how well my fuel pump is working?
Secondly is there some kind of booklet available as to how to change
the float and jets on a carb? (something that'll suit one who is very
green around the ears in this department) :dunno:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Weber

Do you know what type of Weber you have? If it's the Weber 36 dcd I have a lot of info that would help you that's in a manual. If you're in Jhb you can pick up a copy of it or I could try scanning it and e-mailing it to you. If it's the 38 DGAS I might also be able to get some info from a friend. There are also downloads of diffenrent models from Weber sites although I find they are sometimes difficult to fathom.

Changing the jets is very easy once you know their location on the carb. Takes about five minutes max for the main jets and about ten minutes for the emulsion tubes.

Try www.redlineweber.com for a diagram.
 

·
Profesional Hunter
Joined
·
443 Posts
Butternut said:
At long last a constructive answer to the question I have been trying to
get a response from for the last year!

WHAT A GOOD FIND THIS FORUM IS TURNING OUT TO BE FOR ME! :clap:

OK, now I do I go about checking how well my fuel pump is working?
Secondly is there some kind of booklet available as to how to change
the float and jets on a carb? (something that'll suit one who is very
green around the ears in this department) :dunno:
Thanx man!

I would not worry on testing the pump, get a kit and recon the pump in any case, it is not that expensive (R100 for my 2,25's pump) I dont know if you have a diffrent pump for the V8.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top