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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I stripped out the threaded inserts on the frame of my 2003 Discovery near the rear center of the vehicle. These threaded holes are used for trailer hitch mounts and for the center bracket for a steel bumper (my rear bumper is a Britpart).
I have ordered some steel inserts which are stepped (like a flange) and designed to be welded into a blind hole (no access from the back).
My plan is to:1) disconnect the battery; 2) use some sheet aluminum and wet towels to shield the fuel tank; 3) drill frame for the insert; 4) clean the area with a wire brush and/or an angle grinder; 5) tack, then weld the inserts using a flux wire welder.
I really think the fuel tank shielding is overkill as there is little spatter from the welder and its not all that close to the fuel tank.
Two questions:
1) Any other safety precaustions I should be taking? (Besides the obvious eye protection, gloves, fire extinguisher nearby and the items listed above).
2) My welding experience is limited to arc welding in a classroom setting a few years ago. I have never done any overhead welding. I do expect to practice using some angle stock before starting on the Disco.
Any advice for doing overhead welding with a flux wire welder?

LandRoverRock
2003 Land Rover Discovery; Terrafirma 2" springs/shocks; ARB winch bumper; generic (Chinese) 9K winch; Hella lighting; custom rear storage; Kenwood CD/DVD/Nav/Sirius/rear camera; Python anti-theft/remote start in process.
 

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'03 Disco SE
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573 Posts
Be really careful to avoid the EVAP purge lines leading to and from the gas tank. They're filled with fuel vapors and can ignite if you get spatter near them. That whole area is a bit dangerous in terms of welding, just because those vapors are so volatile.

What are the specs on the flux core welder you'll be using? The real difficulty with overhead welds is that gravity is working against your weld puddle so the penetration often isn't as good, particularly with the 115V low-amp welders. It might not be a bad idea to preheat the location (even a propane torch is better than nothing) to ensure you get some decent penetration.

After that just make sure you get some good paint on the exposed metal, D2 frames love to rust.
 

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Don't catch yourself on fire. I was doing some overhead on my 1st jeep a long time ago. I was on my back, under it...my old flannel kept the sparks off me, but got a bit warm once my shirt caught on fire. Live and learn :)
 
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