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1 year ago, I bought New Discovery 5. Now it is 15,800 miles and went to service for Oil change.
Service consultant asked me to change rear brake pad and rotor and it cost more than 1,000 dollars.
Does it make sense?
This means every 15,000 miles I have to pay more that 1000 dollars to change brake pad and rotor.
Does it make sense?
 

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Seems awfully early but driving styles and traffic varies. Have you looked at the pads and rotors to see if they are needing replacement?
 

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At 16K miles it seems way too early to need new rotors unless they were warped. You should learn to change the brake pads yourself; very easy. I would have asked for the specs on the rotors; if they were still in spec, I would not have changed them out. And no, you should not have this expense every 16K miles. Suggest you look around for another mechanic unless this would void your warranty.

By the way, your rear pads should last much longer than the front so I have no idea what happened. I have had my '99 DII for over fifteen years and have not changed the rears more than once or twice that I remember.
 

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No, I don't.
I leased Lexus GX460 before this car and I did not change pads and rotors till I return at 30,000 miles.
 

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I have over 20,000 mi on mine and my brakes are still practically new. And I drive regularly in the Rockies, though I'll say I have the 3.0L diesel and I downshift on long downhills.

If an amber warning light was not on, then your brakes were not worn. The D5 has wear sensors that will trip as the pads wear down through the sensors and break a connection.

My 2010 Touareg 3.0 TDI got 77,000 miles out of the OEM pads - and that was when the sensors tripped and indicated the pads needed to be changed.
 

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You will find the service department will tell you the brakes pads need changed with 4 mm of pad remaining. They will also change the rotors with every pad change. It is possible that if you have a piston sticking or a pad sticking you do need new pads. You only have sensors on the rear right and front left wheel. They are on the piston side pad and will not touch the rotor until about 1.5 mm of pad is left. If you are inclined and have the equipment to remove the wheel you can check the pads yourself. If not find a good independent and have them check the brakes. I got an extra 10 k miles after the dealer told me the rear brakes need changed on my 2015 LR4. I changed them myself for less than $150. Not a difficult job they have videos on how to do it at Atlantic British website for the LR3 and LR4. Should be about the same for your Disco 5. The also have them for the RR Sport if yours are that type.
 

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Brakes are a serious issue but you have to understand beforehand that 9/10 mechanics just want your money.

They told me I needed new rotors thinking I knew nothing and there was barely a lip on the rotor. I drove another 30,000 miles before changing and did not even need it.

They just want your money.
 

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I have a 2017 Discovery and a 2014 RRS. On both vehicles the rear brakes go much faster than the front. They activate before the fronts to help reduce nose dip while braking. The factory pads and rotors are designed to wear out at the same rate. 20,000 miles is fairly normal for me on both vehicles. RRS has close to 100k on it and the Discovery Td6 has just over 40. I do my own brakes so I tried after market pads and rotors on the both just to see how they worked. They seem to lasting longer. The cost of the after market set is about 250.00. I’m by no means an expert. I’m just relaying my experience. I hope it helps.
 

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"They activate before the fronts to help reduce nose dip while braking. The factory pads and rotors are designed to wear out at the same rate. " That is very interesting and something I have never heard before.

Where did you find this info? Not saying it is incorrect - would just like to see for myself.
 

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"They activate before the fronts to help reduce nose dip while braking. The factory pads and rotors are designed to wear out at the same rate. " That is very interesting and something I have never heard before.

Where did you find this info? Not saying it is incorrect - would just like to see for myself.
I asked my mechanic after the third time I had to do the rear brakes. I was trying to blame my wife’s “full gas to full brake” driving style.
It seems to be true since the front brakes lasted about 50k for me.
 

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Sorry, but that sounds like an urban myth.

Guys - anyone out there able to confirm?
I was just hoping offering my experience to the original question at the top of this thread. As I stated, I’m not an expert. Regardless, the rear brakes wear out faster than the fronts on both of my vehicles. That’s not a myth. I now do them on my own after my mechanic showed me how to disarm the electric park brake.
Enjoy the weekend. Hopefully some of us get to get out and enjoy our Rovers.
Stay safe everyone.
 

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You offered that as fact rather then experience which is not the same. So we need to be able to separate the two.

That said I would like to know if the LR engineers designed the brakes that way. Could be so and would enrich the wealth of knowledge on the forum.
 

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You offered that as fact rather then experience which is not the same. So we need to be able to separate the two.

That said I would like to know if the LR engineers designed the brakes that way. Could be so and would enrich the wealth of knowledge on the forum.
I’ll try to be more clear next time. I’m new here. I thought I wrote that I was not an expert and that it was my experience. Maybe I forgot. My apologies for misguiding you. I took it as fact from him as his dad and he both worked at a dealership and now he runs a well respected shop in the area. I’m on my 5th Land Rover. I own three now. One is 2000 P38. I continue to beat the heck out of them and deal with quirky and often frustrating issues that come along with owning a Land Rover. I would want it any other way. I’m sure most of us in this group feel the same.
 

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I’ll try to be more clear next time. I’m new here. I thought I wrote that I was not an expert and that it was my experience. Maybe I forgot. My apologies for misguiding you. I took it as fact from him as his dad and he both worked at a dealership and now he runs a well respected shop in the area. I’m on my 5th Land Rover. I own three now. One is 2000 P38. I continue to beat the heck out of them and deal with quirky and often frustrating issues that come along with owning a Land Rover. I would want it any other way. I’m sure most of us in this group feel the same.
There's more than one way to deactivate the electronic parking brake before changing the rear pads. Can you please provide a detailed instruction of how your mechanic instructed you in deactivating it? Thanks much.
 
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