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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have info/experience or knowledge of putting a small marine diesel in a RR or Disco?

:beer: or have I had too much to drink :beer:
 

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Many many people have put perkins engines into landrovers a very good idea me thinks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Any idea of where to get brackets, mounts...

Know of any writings on the swap? :bgreen:
 

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Dude do a google search, there is a lot of stuff out there im sure!

Conversion plates and mounts etc are widely available, over here atleast...

P.S. love the bouncy smily, my favourite!

I take it you will be swapping it in, in favour of a V8?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
SimonArmstrong said:
Dude do a google search, there is a lot of stuff out there im sure!

Conversion plates and mounts etc are widely available, over here atleast...

P.S. love the bouncy smily, my favourite!

I take it you will be swapping it in, in favour of a V8?
Yep, will pull out a V8 and put in the diesel...Was hoping to get some response here instead of having to weed through search engines and hopefully find someone with direct knowledge....and since you liked it so much: :bgreen: :bgreen: :bgreen: :bgreen: :bgreen: :bgreen: :bgreen:
 

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I aint done it...yet!

I think a company called millers(??) make the mounts, you could try them?
 

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Perkins Conversion

Its quite a good conversion,however there are a few thing you need to know.
There are 2 common types of perkins engine fitted to landys and rangies,the first one is a perkins 4203(4203 denotes 4 cylinder 203 cubic inches)which is an engine witha metric capacity of 3.3 litres a good strong engine yet a little unerfined will pull a house down but noisy and not for long journeys normally found in series vehicles occasionally in range rovers,the other type is a perkins 4236 of 3.8 liters in my opinion one of the best rangie conversions,the engines are bomb proof very solid and strong they also do a turbo version of this power unit.These engines are common marine engines in th U.S.
The conversion company is called milners but I dont think they are in buisness any longer but secondhand engines with kits can be sourced quite readily.

ONz out.
 

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Another good one

Have you fellows looked into the V8 GMC Diesels (6.2/6.5l the ones the Hummers are fitted with) we use them in rangies etc a company called samurai do the conversions over here probably more suited to you chaps as availability will be better and engines cheaper. :drive:

Cheers Onz :buttrock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
6.2 Diesels...

onslow said:
Have you fellows looked into the V8 GMC Diesels (6.2/6.5l the ones the Hummers are fitted with) we use them in rangies etc a company called samurai do the conversions over here probably more suited to you chaps as availability will be better and engines cheaper. :drive:

Cheers Onz :buttrock:
thanks for the tip.... But I do not want the weight of a large V8, plus I have owned a 6.2 and although the parts are available, I'd prob have to buy a bunch of them, my last 6.2 was unreliable, and reliability is why I want to go diesel. The 6.2 was not designed from the ground up as a diesel...I would like a commercial or marine duty engine, in which parts are easily obtained world-wide, in case I take the thing to AU or Alaska...etc.

So everyone pls keep an eye out for any kits or ready made components to assist in the conversion, I would prefer to use a Yanmar, Kubota, Perkins, etc. prob 4 cyl. w/turbo

many thanks for your info though :drink1:
 

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Perkins Diesels

Couldn't agree with Onslow more. Perkins engines will outlast UHT milk. My Dad had a big 4 in his sailboat, I had a 6-354 in my fishing boat. They are heavy, but tons of low end torque. You will need to evaluate you gearing carfully as they don't rev like your V8.
There's a guy in Fort Lauderdale who has lots of Perkins engines, Auto & Marine of Ft. L His name is Oliver Jones. He also has a bunch of Nissans and Isuzus but I just couldn't bring myself to use one, though I understand Isuzu conversions are pretty popular too, GM and Ford Diesels are too heavy for a Rangie, but properly resprung, I guess OK in a Def.
I looked into the Brazilian International 2.8, alot more torque and HP than a 300Tdi, but lack of spare parts suppliers scared me off. The nice thing about that engine is you can use your ZF gearbox AS-IS.
I ended up scratch building a 4.2 to replace my 3.9 in the Defender. HUGE improvemant, and rechipped, get 25% fuel improvement, though I wish I knew about the good deals on new 4.6 Bosch longblocks
 

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Don't know if this is still a problem but some of the older Perkins Range Rover conversions used to be a real pain to start in cold weather. Might be worth looking into this for that trip to Alaska! Hope they now have glow plugs!
 

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starting

Some of the very old p4 perkins where a pig to start but the 203 and 236 have thermo starts and are rarely used so starting isnt a problem anymore but certainly a valid point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
thanks for all the input...

I am working on a design for a diesel rover set up including a custom trailer/sleeper unit capable of self-sustained living/traveling for 6 or so months. I will soon post a link to the website I am creating for the project and hope everyone will give input/ideas.

For several reasons I have decided to go with a Yanmar Engine...

Look for a link soon
 

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Hi Curt,
I would be very interested in the yanmar conversion,would appreciate any info whilst you are carrying out the conversion.
Cheers Tony
 

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Curt, i too would be greatly interested in the yanmar conversion, keep us poseted

simon
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
here is my rough plan

Start off with 3 swb RRC, cut 2 in half to make trailer/camper unit which would haul extra gear, provide sleeping for 2 w/heat & a/c, inverter tankage, etc. here is a rough idead (I'm planning a classic not p38)

For the engine, the Yanmar Turbo Diesel, trans 6sp manual, power vac assisted brake system (off engine driven pump), engine driven air compressor, 4kw diesel genset/watermaker, etc. etc. etc.

will post website with parts lists and details later, then document the build.

:drive:
 

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onslow said:
Its quite a good conversion,however there are a few thing you need to know.
There are 2 common types of perkins engine fitted to landys and rangies,the first one is a perkins 4203(4203 denotes 4 cylinder 203 cubic inches)which is an engine witha metric capacity of 3.3 litres a good strong engine yet a little unerfined will pull a house down but noisy and not for long journeys normally found in series vehicles occasionally in range rovers,the other type is a perkins 4236 of 3.8 liters in my opinion one of the best rangie conversions,the engines are bomb proof very solid and strong they also do a turbo version of this power unit.These engines are common marine engines in th U.S.
The conversion company is called milners but I dont think they are in buisness any longer but secondhand engines with kits can be sourced quite readily.

ONz out.

In the 1980's Land Rover South Africa brought the SIII (Pickup & 10 seater) out with the Perkins 4236 as standerd factory spec. These were officially known as the R6. These landys are strong as a set of Oxen! although very slow (85km/h Max). They were also very noisy and quite heavy on Diesel.

A mate of mine have a Pick up in this fromat and with some noise reduction materiel in the enjine bay and the cab managed to get the noise down.
He also fitted Freeweel hubs and a Fairly Overdrive. Now he has a very good sucsessfull Landy.
 

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Moeras
Was that the series 3 stage 1 ? In Australia we had the 3.9 litre Isuzu diesel as a factory option from 1979 until the Defender was released here, it was a very popular option and considered by many owners here as the best Land Rover ever. The V8 was not nearly as popular, though there are a few around.
I converted mine to run on waste vegetable oil, and have not had any problems in the last 2 years since I converted it.
I recently bought a 1982 4door Range Rover and am presently in the process of replacing the V8 with a 3.6 litre Isuzu diesel I got the motor from a friend for $100 so it will be a very economical conversion, the 3.6 has 500 more RPM than the 3.9 diesel so hopefully it will suit the Range Rover even better than a 3.9, and because the Isuzu was a factory option over here, the conversion isn't as exotic as it may seem from other parts of the world.

kind regards....Ron
 

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Davey

Curt said:
Anyone have info/experience or knowledge of putting a small marine diesel in a RR or Disco?

:beer: or have I had too much to drink :beer:

I think the VM was originally a marine diesel and in my opinion VMs are absolutely excellent IF PROPERLY INSTALLED, INSTRUMENTED AND ALARMED. As fitted in Range Rovers they are not much good, but they are truly excellent in the Rover 825SD. Why is this? Well the 825 has a low water indicator, a temperature gauge that you can see even in the dark and an overheat light that blinks and is very attention grabbing. (my 825s overheating is due to missing, corroded away radiator fins and is being fixed). The 825 being transverse also doesn't have the problem of the water pump getting to be the highest thing when going up a steep hill.:mad: The Rangies viscous fan can also be a big problem and mine would be stiff when cold but freewheel when hot! Very bad news indeed. Fitting a solid fan from a 1973 Ford Granada was a great help as was a new radiator but alas the cooling system failed whilst hauling a heavy trailer up Chideock Hill on the A35. On the Rangie, once the water cooling fails the oil cooling also stops as the oil cooler is in the rad. (the 825 has a separate oil radiator similar to the Ford Scorpio VM and this seems a much better idea) Other Rangie snags are that the thermistor for the temperature gauge is in the water pipe to the radiator, and not in the cylinder head. Once the water and steam have gone, the temperature gauge begins to fall because this part is cooled by the fan. So you think things are getting better when they are actually getting worse:mad: . The end result is a knackered engine. 825s have the sensor in the head where it should be. The Scorpio has a north-south 2.5 VM and they are not noted for overheating but then they do have a big twin-fan high-tech alloy radiator. Possibly a Scorpio VM block (120BHP) could be adapted to suit a Range Rover. (the flywheel is different, as are a great many other details)
Another good engine which is relatively inexpensive is the Rover Maestro/Montego turbo 2 litre (Perkins Prima in marine form) These give about 80BHP and being direct injection are very economical. The power is about twice that of early Landys and is OK. Best of all there is none of that infernal drive-by-wire stuff but there is regretably a timing belt.
Good luck with your projects and best regards from Davey.
 

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beg to differ

I have a 110 with a perkins 236 and can drive 115-120 on flat and get 30 miles per gallon, Off road it is like an underdrive as it has loads of torque at less than 1000 rpm's. this is not the turbo version. Don't try to start at less than 0 deg without plugging in. I love this motor and am in the market for another. There are a few serious things that need to be done so make sure you shop for the right one. any help needed email [email protected]
cheers
Luke
 
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